Carmarthen Genealogical Records

Carmarthen Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St David, Carmarthen Baptism Registers (1837-1912)

Baptism registers record the baptism of those born in and around St David, Carmarthen and were subsequently baptised in an Anglican place of worship. They are the primary source of birth details before 1837, though are useful to the present. Records can include name of child, parent's names, residence, occupations and more.

St Peter, Carmarthen Baptism Registers (1699-1907)

Baptism records from people born in and around Carmarthen between 1699 and 1907. Lists the name of people's parent's, their occupations and abode.

FreeBMD Births (1837-1957)

An index to births registered at the central authority for England & Wales. The index provides the area where the birth was registered, mother's maiden name from September 1911 and a reference to order a birth certificate.

British Army Birth Index (1761-2005)

An index to births registered to British Army personal at home and abroad.

Carmarthen Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St David, Carmarthen Marriage Registers (1842-1927)

Name index linked to original images of the marriage registers of St David, Carmarthen. Records document marriages from 1842 to 1927. Details may include a party's age, residence, martial status, father's name and signature.

St Peter, Carmarthen Banns Registers (1754-1915)

Registers of those who intended to marry. An intended marriage was called for three weeks at church, so parishioners could voice objection to the marriage. Contains details on an individual's parish of residence.

St Peter, Carmarthen Marriage Registers (1672-1916)

The Marriage registers of St Peter, Carmarthen, document marriages 1672 to 1916. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status, residence and signature.

Vicar General’s Office Marriage Licences (1600-1679)

Abstracts of marriage licences granted by the Vicar-General in London. These licences could be used to marry in any church in the Province of Canterbury.

Carmarthen Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St David, Carmarthen Burial Registers (1841-1952)

Burial registers are the primary source for death documentation before 1837, though are relevant to the present. They record the date someone was buried, their age & residence.

St Peter, Carmarthen Burial Registers (1671-1885)

Burial records for people buried at St Peter, Carmarthen between 1671 and 1885. Lists the deceased's name, residence and age.

FreeBMD Deaths (1837-1964)

An index to deaths registered at the central authority for England and Wales. To 1866, only the locality the death was registered in was listed. Age was listed until 1969, when the deceased's date of birth was listed. Provides a reference to order a death certificate, which has further details.

British Army Death Index (1796-2005)

An index to deaths of British Army personal at home and abroad.

Carmarthen Church Records

Carmarthen Parish Registers (1671-1952)

The parish registers of Carmarthen provide details of births, marriages and deaths from 1671 to 1952. Parish registers can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Carmarthenshire Parish Registers (1560-1980)

The parish registers of Carmarthenshire are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths. Their records can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Wales Parish Registers (1914-2013)

The parish registers of Wales are a collection of books documenting baptisms, marriages and burials from 1914 to 2013.

Wales Parish Registers (1538-1934)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though useful to the present also.

The Welsh Church Year Book (1929)

Important information relating to the church, including jurisdictions and names of ministers, archdeacons etc.

Carmarthen Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1881 British Census (1881)

The 1881 census provides details on an individual's age, residence and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows for searches on multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

British Phone Books (1880-1984)

Directories containing over 275,000,000 entries. As well as name, address and phone number, occupations are often recorded. A useful census substitute.

Carmarthen Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1649-1660)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1581-1619)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1581-1595)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1559-1571)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Newspapers Covering Carmarthen

Publications of The South Wales Record Society (1987-1994)

A journal publishing historical sources relating to South Wales, with introductory texts, indexes and illustrations.

West Wales Historical Records (1911-1927)

Various volumes of The Historical Society of West Wales' journal, which include transcripts, indices and abstracts of numerous records such as hearth tax returns, parish registers, marriage licences and wills.

South Wales Daily Post (1893-1910)

2,700 fully searchable editions of a conservative newspaper. It contained local news, family announcements, sports etc.

Brython Cymreig (1892-1910)

Fully searchable editions, linked to page images, of a Welsh language newspaper that circulated in Cardiganshire, North Pembrokeshire and Carmarthanshire.

South Wales Star (1891-1894)

A liberal newspaper that published local news, family notices, adverts etc. It was liberal in politics. Each edition has been indexed and digitised.

Carmarthen Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Carmarthen Cemeteries

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Mausolea and Monuments (1500-Present)

Profiles of several hundred mausolea found in the British Isles.

Maritime Memorials (1588-1950)

Several thousand transcribed memorials remembering those connected with the nautical occupations.

Rail & Canal Photographs Catalog (1880-1970)

A searchable database of photographs relating to railways and canals in Britain.

Rail & Canal Monuments (1800-1950)

Details of monuments and plaques related to canals and railways. Contains some photographs.

Carmarthen Directories & Gazetteers

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1923)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1910)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1901)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory of Monmouthshire & S Wales (1895)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1895)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

England & Wales Criminal Registers (1791-1892)

This collection lists brief details on 1.55 million criminal cases in England and Wales between 1791 and 1892. Its primary use is to locate specific legal records, which may give further details on the crime and the accused. Details may include the accused's age, nature of crime, location of trial and sentence. Early records can contain a place of birth.

Old Bailey Online (1674-1913)

A database of almost 200,000 fully transcribed criminal cases. Access to original documents is also provided. Records may provide ages and place of birth.

Carmarthen Taxation Records

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Index to Death Duty Registers (1796-1903)

An index to wills and administrations that incurred a death duty tax. The index can be used to order documents that give a brief abstract of the will and details on the duty. It can be used as a make-shift probate index.

Index to the Royalist Composition Papers (A-F) (1646-1656)

Index to personal names listed in the Royalist Composition Papers that dealt with the estates of royalists.

Carmarthen Land & Property Records

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem (1236-1291)

Abstracts of records detailing the estates and families of deceased tenants from the reigns of Henry III and Edward I.

NLW Manuscript Transcripts (1200-2000)

A searchable database of thousands of transcribed and abstracted manuscripts, largely pertaining to land.

Landowners of England & Wales (1873)

A list of owners of above one acre of land in England & Wales. Lists a landowner's residence, acreage and estimated gross yearly rental.

Carmarthen Occupation & Business Records

Swansea Gazette & Daily Shipping Register (1909-1910)

A liberal newspaper that predominantly covered mercantile and shipping matters. It did not contain family announcements. Each edition has been indexed and digitised.

Smuggling on the West Coast (1690-1867)

An introduction to smuggling on the west coast of Britain & the Isle of Man, with details of the act in various regions.

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

UK Medical Registers (1859-1959)

Books listing doctors who were licensed to operate in Britain and abroad. Contains doctor's residencies, qualification and date of registration.

Railway Employment Records (1833-1963)

A rich collection of records documenting those who worked for railway companies that were later absorbed by the government. Records include: staff registers, station transfers, pensions, accident records, apprentice records, caution books, and memos. Records may include date of birth, date of death and name of father.

Carmarthen School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Carmarthen

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Carmarthen Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Burke's Landed Gentry of Britain & Ireland (1885)

Lineages of Britain and Ireland's untitled landed families; supplemented with biographical sketches.

Carmarthen Military Records

Carmarthenshire WWI Memorials (1914-1918)

A list of names found on World War One monuments in Carmarthenshire, with some service details.

Carmarthenshire WWII Memorials (1914-1918)

A list of names found on World War Two monuments in Carmarthenshire, with some service details.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls (1914-1920)

Index and original images of over 5 million medal index cards for British soldiers It can be searched by individual's name, Coprs, Unit and Regiment. Due to the loss of many WWI service records, this is the most complete source for British WWI soldiers

Carmarthen Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Aliens Entry Books (1794-1921)

An un-indexed collection of over 100,000 documents of correspondence and other documents of the Home Office and the Aliens Office. Contains a great deal of information on aliens and those who applied for naturalisation.

Carmarthen Histories & Books

Publications of The South Wales Record Society (1987-1994)

A journal publishing historical sources relating to South Wales, with introductory texts, indexes and illustrations.

West Wales Historical Records (1911-1927)

Various volumes of The Historical Society of West Wales' journal, which include transcripts, indices and abstracts of numerous records such as hearth tax returns, parish registers, marriage licences and wills.

Carmarthenshire Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in Carmarthenshire.

Geograph: Photos of the UK and Ireland (2005-Present)

A growing database including millions of photographs of the United Kingdom, Isle of Man and Ireland catalogued by latitude & longitude and OS grid reference.

Britain from Above (1919-1953)

Ariel photographs of the British Isles. Browsable by location.

Biographical Directories Covering Carmarthen

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Church of England Clergy Database (1500-1835)

A database of CoE clergy, giving details of their education of service. Contains references to source documents. Also contains profiles of various church institutions.

Carmarthen Maps

Maps of Carmarthenshire (1610-1880)

A collection of digitalised maps covering the county.

Ordnance Survey Maps of Wales (1868-1954)

An interactive map featuring four OS map editions published between 1868 and 1954. To load a map select the menu tab on the far right, select the edition you wish to view and zoom in to a locality.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Carmarthen Reference Works

Wales Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in Wales.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Carmarthen Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

Carmarthen, or Caervyrddin, from its being situated on the conflux of a brook, called Byrddin, and the Tywi, on the western bank of the Tywi; and being partly on a considerable elevation, it has a striking appearance, and a commanding prospect. All the principal streets contain a large proportion of good houses, and though the streets are not regular, it is not a whit more objectionable on this ground than many of the old towns. The principal thoroughfare in the middle of the town, besides being very steep, is exceedingly narrow. The actual length of the town is about three-fourths of a mile, and about half a mile wide; it was formerly surrounded by a high wall, with fortified gates, &c. The communication with the country, on the eastward, is formed by a substantial stone bridge, of several arches, over the Tywi. A beautiful public walk at the upper end of the town, is called the Parade, which commands an extensive view of the vale. The Guildhall is situated in the middle of the town; it has a grand staircase in the front, which is highly ornamental to the structure. . The county gaol occupies a part of the site of the castle, and was built on the well-intended, but injudicious plan of the philanthropic Howard. The excellent marketplace is, with great propriety, placed a small distance from the town. Since the year 1803, water has been conveyed in iron pipes into the town, from some excellent springs in the neighbourhood. There are here no manufactories of consequence, though in the vicinity are some iron and tin works on a tolerably extensive scale. Besides a fabrication of coarse hats, Carmarthen supplies the neighbouring country with shop goods of various descriptions, to a very large annual amount, and carries on an extensive export trade in corn, butter, &c. to Bristol and other ports: vessels of about 300 tons burden, are admitted to the town, and a very handsome and substantial quay has lately been built. The inns here are numerous, and some of them very good. The Ivy Bush, formerly a gentleman's residence here, may be ranked among the best inns in the principality. A very respectable newspaper has been published here for some years past. Carmarthen is a borough-town, and sends one member to parliament. Some of its privileges are very ancient, and of unknown origin, and no doubt derived from the Welsh princes, who had their chancery and exchequer here.

Carmarthen contains but one parish, and the church is dedicated to St. Peter. It is a large plain edifice, consisting of two aisles and a chancel, with a lofty square tower at the western end. The neatness of the interior is greatly improved by a handsome, line-toned organ. The most remarkable monument here, is that of Sir Rhys ab Thomas, and his lady, on the north side of the chancel, though they were buried in the adjacent priory, where this monument was originally erected. Nearly opposite to this is another monument, bearing a most grotesque figure of a female, in the act of kneeling, and underneath a singular inscription.

Sir Richard Steele was buried in the cemetery of the Scurlocks, with whom he had been connected by marriage. His want of a monument is said to have been owing to his dying request. Carmarthen contains several places of worship, belonging to different classes of Dissenters, and the Presbyterians have here a very respectable collegiate institution for the education of young men, for the ministry, supported by a public fund in the metropolis. Dr. Abraham Rees, the learned editor of the New Cyclopaedia, has for a long period been one of the visitors. The priory here, was situated northeast of the church, in a part which formerly constituted a township of itself, called Old Carmarthen. The house stood in a large quadrangular court, entered on the north by an arched gateway, part of which still remains in Priory-street; but though this Priory existed before 1148, neither date nor founder is known. At the other end of the town, stood a house of Grey Friars; and behind the Guildhall was a church or chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, not used since the dissolution of monasteries. The remains of the castle are very inconsiderable; being taken in the civil wars, by the parliament forces under General Langhorne, it was suffered to go to decay, though till about twenty-five years ago, a part of it was used for the common gaol.

Antiquaries have generally agreed in fixing the Roman city of Maridunum here, from the junction at this point of the two grand branches of the Julian way. Carmarthen is also the reputed birthplace of the supposed Magician, and prophet Merlin. The return of the population of this place in 1811, is estimated at 7275.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

Caermaden, where Merlin was born, begot by an Incubus, whom the common People took to be a most famous Prophet.

A Geographical Description of the World (1671) by George Meriton

CARMARTHEN, the county town of the shire of that name and a county of itself since 1604, is a municipal and parliamentary borough, and the head of a county court district and poor law union, with a station on the Great Western railway, 232 miles from London, 224 ½ by Great Western railway via the Severn tunnel, and 268 by L. and N.W. railway via Shrewsbury, 121 from Bristol via Neath and Swansea, 132 from Gloucester via Cardiff, 27 by road north-west from Swansea and 32 ½ by rail from the same, and about 9 miles from the sea, in the Western division of the county and in the rural deanery and archdeaconry of Carmarthen and diocese of St. David’s.

From Carmarthen junction station, about a mile distant, there is a branch of the Great Western Railway Company passing through the town, and known as the “Carmarthen and Cardigan Branch,” but at present only carried as far as Llandyssil.

The name “Carmarthen,” or “Caerfyrddin,” as it is called by the Welsh, is popularly supposed to be derived from the celebrated Welsh sage who flourished here about the middle of the 5th century, named Merlin Ambrosius, or Myrddin Emrys, but antiquaries are pretty well agreed that the name “Carmarthen” is formed from the Celtic words “caer” and “dun,” signifying a hill-fortress: as the Maridunum of Antoninus or Muridinum of Ptolemy, the name stems to mean the “sea fort.” In some of the old Welsh chronicles another derivation is assigned to the word, viz., “Caerfyrddyn,” “the citadel of ten thousand,” from “myrdd” a myriad, and “dyn” a man. Little is known of the early history of the place, but a Roman station is said to have been founded here as early as A.D. 70, the site of which is supposed to have been occupied by the castle and outworks.

The town was formerly surrounded by a high wall, with four fortified gates, the remains of which are now incorporated with the Joint Counties' prison. In the space now called “Nott square,” Robert Farrar, or Ferrar, Bishop of St. Davids, 1548—53, was burnt during the Marian persecution, 30 March, 1556.

The modern town of Carmarthen extends for about a mile and a half along the slope of Penlan hill, on the north side of the river Towy, and is irregularly built, the streets converging towards the castle; from the summit of the hill, which is about 400 feet high, picturesque views are obtained of the neighbouring country watered by the Towy, with Carmarthen spread out below; on the opposite side of the river is Llangunnor Hill, also affording a fine prospect; but from Cystanog Hill, Dryslwyn Castle, Grongar Hill, Dynevor Castle and Nelson’s Tower may also be seen, forming, with the extensive surrounding district, a grand and striking panorama. From the Parade, which is much resorted to by visitors on account of the salubrity of the air and its beautiful shaded walk, pleasant views are again presented.

Carmarthen Bay, on the north side and near the entrance of the Bristol Channel, is bounded by Caldy Island on the west and the Worm’s Head on the east, distant from each other about 13 miles. In the bay and about six miles from the mouth of the Towy, which here falls into the sea, lies a sand shoal, called “Burry Bar,” on either side of which is a district rich in coal and minerals, extending many miles westward, and as far eastward as the boundary of the counties of Carmarthen, and Glamorgan.

The Towy is a wide tidal stream, celebrated for its salmon and trout, and boats made of wicker-work and covered with pitched canvas, called “coracles,” are still used by the fishermen as by their predecessors centuries ago: the river is here crossed by an old but handsome stone bridge of seven arches: vessels of 300 tons burden can float up to the quay, which is roomy and conveniently situated.

Parliaments were held hers at an early period, and in the reign of Edward I. this place was also the seat of the Chancery and Exchequer.

The borough has returned one member to Parliament since 27 Henry VIII. (1535—6); and since the passing of the “Reform Act, 1832” (2 and 3 William IV. c. 45), Llanelly has been a contributory borough in the election of a parliamentary representative.

The town was created a borough by King Henry II. as the earliest existing charter is that of Henry VIII. confirmed in 1604 by James I. who also made the borough a county of itself; is has therefore a jurisdiction separate from the shire, and possesses a sheriff of its own, who superintends the execution of all writs within its limits. The assizes are held here three times a year, also the quarter sessions, borough petty sessions for the county, and quarter sessions for the county of the borough on Mondays, presided over by the Mayor, and county sessions on Saturdays. The borough received a new charter from George III. dated 27 July, 1764, and this remained in force until the passing of the “Municipal Corporations Act, 1835” (5 and 6 William IV. c. 76), by which the Corporation was remodelled, and now consists of a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors, who also act as the Urban Sanitary Authority.

The town is well paved and drained, the streets are lighted with gas from works erected in 1822, the supply is derived from the Towy, the water being pumped into the reservoirs of the corporation water works at Penlan; the houses of the old part of the town ere unattractive, but a number of good villas have been erected in the outskirts.

The parish church of St. Peter is an ancient building of stone in the Norman style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, north transept, south porch and a massive embattled western tower, containing a clock and 6 bells: there is an altar-tomb to Sir Rhys ap Thomas K.G.; it was formerly in Grey Friars church, to the south of Lammas street, but on the dissolution of the monastery was removed here, and was restored by Lord Dynevor in 1866: there are also memorials to Bishop Farrar, Sir Richard Steele, the essayist, who died at Llangunnor, 1st September, 1729, and was buried here; and General Sir William Nott G.C.B. the distinguished Indian commander, who died at Carmarthen, January 1st, 1845, and whose remains rest in a vault in the Churchyard; the old colours of the 23rd Foot, or Royal Welsh Fusiliers, have also been placed here: there are six stained windows and a very handsome brass lectern, representing the figure of an angel, in memory of Valentine Davis: at the principal entrance of the churchyard is a lych gate and a stone arch surmounted by a cross, erected in 1879 by public subscription as a memorial to Rev. Latimer Maurice Jones B.D. 14 years vicar of Carmarthen, in admiration of his character as pastor, friend and citizen: there are 900 sittings, of which 500 are free. The services here are entirely English. The register dates from the year 1671. The living is a vicarage, tithe rent-charge £7; gross yearly value £300, ret £250, with residence, in the gift of the Lord Bishop of St. Davids, and held since 1889 by the Right Rev. John Lloyd D.D. of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, canon residentiary of St. David’s and Bishop Suffragan of Swansea.

St. John’s, now a chapel of ease to St. Peter, was built for the Welsh congregation in 1889—90, at a cost of £2,750, and is an edifice in the late Perpendicular style, from designs by Messrs. Middleton, Prothero and Phillott, architects, of Cheltenham, consisting of chancel, neve and aisles: there is a stained window and a fine brass eagle lectern, given in memory of the late Mr. William Spurrell: there are sittings for 350 parsons. The services here are conducted in Welsh. The Rev. Thomas Griffiths B.A. of Jesus College, Oxford, has been curate-in-charge since 1893. Sunday and weekly services' are also held at the Towyside and Cambrian mission rooms.

St. Davids is an ecclesiastical parish formed in, 1843. The church, at the west end of the town, is a building in the Gothic style, consisting of chancel, clerestoried nave, aisles, south porch and an embattled south tower containing one bell: the church was originally erected in 1837 and afterwards enlarged by the addition of nave, aisles and a porch, from designs by Mr. Richard Kyrke Penson. In 1884—6 the original church was formed into a chancel, at a cost of £1,196, from designs by Messrs. Middleton, Prothero and Phillott, of Cheltenham, as a memorial to the Ven. Archdeacon Williams, late vicar: the services are conducted in Welsh: there are sittings for 650 persons. The register dates from the year 1841. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £280 with residence, in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of St. David’s alternately, and held since 1880 by the Rev. Thomas Rees Walters M.A. of Trinity College, Dublin, chaplain of H.M. prison, and surrogate.

Christ Church, which was erected in 1869 as a chapel of ease to St. David, at a cost of £4,000, is an edifice in the Gothic style, from designs by Mr. R. K. Penson, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, a chantry, north transept, north porch and tower containing one bell: the church was opened in September, 1869, and will seat about 700 persons: the services are entirely English.

St. Mary’s Catholic church, Union street, is a structure in the Gothic style, designed by Mr. Charles F. Hansom, architect, of Clifton, Bristol, and was erected in 1851—2, at the expense of Miss Katherine Frances Richardson, daughter of General J. L. Richardson H.E I.C.S. and sister of Lady Van Straubenzee, wife of the late Gen. Sir Charles Van Straubenzee G.C.B.: there are 300 sittings.

The English Baptist chapel is an edifice in the Greek Classic style, with a frontage of Bath stone, including a portico supported by four Corinthian columns, 27 feet high, reached by a broad flight of steps, built at a cost of about £3,000, and opened in June, 1670: there are 400 sittings. The Priory Welsh Congregational church, in Priory street, is an edifice of native stone and hammer-dressed rockwork, with freestone dressings, in the Byzantine Gothic style, and was built at a cost of about £1,700; it will seat about 600 persons: under the chapel is a schoolroom, well lighted from three sides. The Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, in Water street, seats 1,250 persons. The English Congregational chapel, Lammas street, erected at a cost of £1,200, is a building of local stone with Bath stone dressings, in the Early English style, with a tower and spire, 80 feet high: there is a good stained window in the principal from: the chapel was opened May 21st, 1862, and will seat about 500 persons.

A cemetery of 10 acres was formed in 1853, at a cost of £3,250, and has two mortuary chapels: it is under the control of a burial board of 9 members.

The Guildhall, erected about 1582, is a very plain but ancient building, with a spacious court room in which the assizes are held, and containing portraits of the late General Sir Thomas Picton, Major.-Gen. Sir William Nott, John Jones esq. M.P. and David Morris esq. M.P. the two latter being former representatives of this borough: in the grand jury room are busts of Bishop Thirlwall and the late Lord Dynevor: on the ground floor is a room where the sessions and other magisterial business is conducted, and council meetings held.

The meetings of the Carmarthen Chamber of Commerce (formed March, 1894) are also held at the Guildhall, usually bi-monthly, but offender if deemed necessary.

The Masonic Hall, in Spilman street, was opened 17 Dec. 1889, previous to which, the lodge was held at the Ivy Bush hotel. Mr. Walter S. Phillips is the Worshipful Master.

Her Majesty’s Prison for the counties of Carmarthen, Pembroke and Cardigan, in the parish of Newchurch, and erected in 1789—92, occupies the site of the old gaol, and is a building of Blackpool stone, from designs by Messrs. Martin and Chamberlain, architects, of Birmingham: the remains of the ancient castle are included within the prison boundary.

The County Police Station, built in 1882, adjoins H.M.’s prison.

The markets are commodious, well arranged, and amply supplied. Saturday is the market day, and is well attended. Cattle fairs are held on the following days-March 15th and 16th, April 15th and 16th, June 3rd and 4th, July 10th, August 12th and, 13th, September 9th, October 9th and November 14th and 15th; monthly markets for cattle are held the third Tuesday in every month. The cattle market and slaughterhouse, both contiguous, are conveniently disposed.

Woollen weaving, malting, tanning, rope making, iron foundries and the tinplate works form the staple trade.

Steeplechases take place here in February, and a hunters' show is held annually in August; packs of fox and otter hounds are kept in the neighbourhood.

The Carmarthenshire Agricultural Society holds an annual show here in September, and a fat cattle show at Christmas. A farmers' club also holds regulal meetings for the reading of essays and discussions on agricultural topics.

The Assembly Rooms in King street, opened 21st November, 1854, comprise a large hall, 64 by 34 feet, seating 600 persons, and fully licensed for stage plays, a commodious suite of rooms, and also billiard and subscription rooms, all of which are controlled by a body of directors; the other portion of the building is occupied by the Carmarthen Literary and Scientific Institution, founded in 1840, and now numbering about 200 members: it is provided with a library, containing about 5,500 volumes; a reading room, supplied with newspapers and periodicals, and another room for conversation, chess, and draughts. There is also a small collection of geological specimens and articles of vertu, forming the nucleus of a museum of local curiosities.

The Carmarthen County and Borough Infirmary, founded in 1848 through the instrumentality of Mr. Thomas Charles Morris during his mayoralty, stands on the site formerly occupied by Queen Elizabeth's Grammar school: it was designed by Mr. Jenkins, of London, the foundation stone was laid May 14th, 1857, by the Lord Bishop of St. David’s, and the infirmary opened for the reception of patients, July 1st, 1858: only 30 beds are made up, but there is space for 40 if the funds permitted; there were (1894) 142 in-patients and 556 out.

The Joint Counties’ Lunatic Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Cardiganshire and Pembrokeshire, erected about 1868, is a structure of Welsh sandstone, with Bath stone dressings, and being situated on an eminence is a prominent object for many miles' round. The site and grounds contain about 46 acres, part of which is laid out in shrubberies and lawns; the rest of the land is used for growing different crops and household vegetables. The asylum is built to hold about 600 officers, attendants, servants and patients, but has recently (1895) been enlarged by the addition of a new female hospital, a special hospital for infectious diseases holding 25 male and 25 females patients, a new chapel seating 500, pathological museum, head attendant’s house at Job’s Well, farm buildings and workshops; the new chapel, opened in 1889, is a building of sandstone, with Bath stone dressings, in the Early English style, and consists of chancel, nave, transepts, aisles, organ chamber and a turret containing one bell: the services at the chapel are open to the public: the old chapel is now being converted into day rooms and dormitories for 50 additional patients: the work was carried out from the designs of Mr. Ernest Collier M.S.A. of Carmarthen, the whole of the stone being quarried and the work done by the staff and patients of the asylum. “Job’s Well" and “Rhydygors” are out-stations: the former, which is about 300 yards from the main building, was begun by General Nott, who died Jan. 1st, 1845, and will hold about 50 people; “Rhydygors,” the old seat of the Edwards family, and let on lease to the asylum, is situated about a mile from the main building, and is available for 50 convalescents; the mansion stands on the site of a fortified out-post of the town, portions of the walls of which are still remaining, and is surrounded by beautiful grounds close to the river Towy. There axe 286 male patients, 271 female.

At the entrance of the town from the west stands a plain quadrangular obelisk of grey limestone, about 60 feet high, erected to the memory of General Sir Thomas Picton, who was descended from an old Pembrokeshire family, and fell at Waterloo, is June, 1815, when in command of the fifth division: it occupies the site of a more elaborate column, erected to the memory of the same hero, but struck by lightning.

The Welsh Fusiliers’ moument, dedicated to the memory of the officers and men of the 23rd Foot who fell in the Russian war, was erected at the expense of Colonel Lysons, of the 25th Queen’s Own Borderers, and late Colonel of the 23rd, and his brother officers, and consists of a pedestal, inscribed with the names of all the officers and men belonging to the regiment who fell on the field of battle, or were out off by disease during the campaign, and a tall shaft bearing the names of all the battles and sieges this distinguished regiment took part in, surmounting which is a plume of feathers in gilt metal, and the monument is surrounded with a cast iron railing in the form of crossed, muskets. In front, on a massive carriage, is placed one of the Russian guns captured by the regiment on the heights above the Alma Sept. 20, 1854.

In Nott square, elevated on a pedestal of granite, is a full length bronze statue of General Sir William Nott, attired in full uniform, with a military cloak. The statue was erected, in 1851 on the site of the old, Market-cross, removed in June, 1846, on the completion of the new Market-place.

Walter Davereux, first Earl of Essex of that family, was born here in or about December, 1538: he was for some time known as Lord Ferrers, brat in 1558 succeeded to the title of Viscount Hereford, and 1572 was created Earl of Essex for his services against the Northern rebels: he died, at Dublin, 22nd September, 1576.

The county of the borough of Carmarthen, which ineludes the whole parish, of St. Peter, is divided into two wards for municipal purposes, respectively named Eastern Ward and Western Ward, which contained in 1891 a population of 5,836 in the Eastern and 4,464 in the Western Ward, and for County Council purposes into four divisions. The population of the ecclesiastical parishes in 1891 was-St. David, 4,137; St. Peter, 4,678. In 1891 there were 101 officers and inmates in the workhouse, and 626 in the Joint Counties Asylum. The population of the parliamentary district of boroughs in 1891 was 34,607, of which 24,307 were in Llanelly. The area of the parish is 5,153 acres of land and 20 water and foreshore; rateable value, £38,410.

Petty Sessions are held at the Shire hall every Saturday at 12 noon. The following parishes are included in the petty sessional division:-Abergwili, Abernant, Conwilin-Elvet, Kidwelly, Llanarthney, Llanddarog, Llandefeilog, Llangain, Llangendairne, Llangunnock, Llangunnor, Llanllawddog, Llanpumpsaint, Llanstephan, Merthyr, Newchurch, St. Ishmael, Trelech-ar-Bettws.

Carmarthen Union

Board day, every alternate Saturday at the Workhouse, at 10.30 a.m.

The following is a list of places in the union:-Abergwilly, Abernant, Carmarthen (St. Peter), Conwil in Elvet, Ferry Side, Laugharne, Llanarthne, Llanddarog, Llandawke, Llandeifeilog, Landilo-Abercowin, Llandowror, Llanllawddog, Llanfihangel-Abercowin, Llangain, Llangendeirne, Llanginning, Llangunnock, Llangunnor, Llanpumsaint, Llansaduren, Llanstephan, Llanwinio, Laugharne parish, Merthyr, Mydrim, Newchurch, St. Clears, St. Ishmaels & Trelach-ar-Bettws. The rateable value of the union in 1894 was £186,665; area, 163,231 acres; the population in 1891, 34,137.

Workhouse, a building of stone, built in 1837, for 140 inmates.

Places of Worship, with times of Services

St. Peter’s Parish Church, St. Peter’s street, Right Rev. John Lloyd D.D. Bishop of Swansea, vicar; Rev. John Daniel B.A. Rev. David John Evans M.A. & David T. Griffiths B.A. curates; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. & Fri. 7.30 p.m.

St. John’s Welsh (Chapel of Ease), Priory street; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m.

St. David’s Church (Welsh), Lammas street, Rev. Thos. Rees Walters M.A. vicar; Rev. John O. Evans & Rev. Lewis Davies B.A. curates; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

Christ Church (English), Lammas street, Rev. Thomas Rees Walters M.A. vicar; 8.30 & 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m.

Llanllwch Church, Rev. Jonathan Marsden B.D. vicar; 10 a.m. & 3 p.m. alternately, & 6 p.m.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Union street, Very Rev. Polycarp Clifford & Rev. Peter Paul Smyth, priests; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; holy days, mass, 10 a.m.; daily mass, 8 a.m.

Baptist, Lammas street, Rev. Andrew Fuller Mills B.A. 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m. 400.

Baptist (Welsh) Priory street, Rev. Griffith Humphrey Roberts; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Mon. & Thur. 7 p.m. 800 Baptist (Welsh) Tabernacle, Waterloo terrace, Rev. Evan W. Thomas, minister; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Mon. 7 p.m. 800.

Calvinistic Methodist (Zion), Rev. William W. Lewis; 11 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. 350.

Calvinistic Methodist (Welsh), Water street; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. 1,250.

Calvinistic Methodist( Welsh), Pensarn; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. 200.

Congregational, Lammas street, Rev. Darid Jenkin Thomas, 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7.30 p.m. 500.

Congregational (Welsh), Lammas street, Rev. David Evans; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m. 1,200,

Congregational (Welsh), Priory street, Rev. Daniel Cadvan Jones; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Tues. & Thur. 7 p.m. 600.

Congregational (Welsh), Union street, Rev. David Stephen Davies; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m. 600.

Unitarian, Mansel street, Rev. Philemon Moore B.A. 11 a.m. 200.

Wesleyan, Chapel street, Rev. Thomas Bennett; 10 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m. 400.

Wesleyan (Welsh), John street; 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. 250.

Colleges & Schools

The South Wales & Monmouthshire Training College stands on the slope of a hill overlooking the valley of the Towy: the foundation stone was laid by Bishop Connop Thirlwall, July 16th, 1847, & the building opened October 24th, 1848; the funds for its erection were obtained partly from subscriptions of members of the Church of England, & partly by a grant from the National Society, in whose hands, until a recent date, the management of the college was placed: the buildings comprise a dining-hall, two lecture rooms, sixty-two dormitories, tutors’ rooms, a library & chapel; the latter contains five stained windows to the memory of former principals & tutors; Rev. Charles Gilbert Brown B.A. Lond. principal; Harry S. Holmes B.A., B.Sc. vice-principal.

The Presbyterian College, on the Parade, is the continuation of the Academy founded by the Rev. Samuel Jones M.A. sometime Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, one of the two thousand ejected ministers of 1662; & is supported & governed by the Presbyterian Board, London, founded in 1680. It is endowed in part by the will of Dr. Daniel Williams (1644—1 715), by the Jackson trustees & the Berman trustees. The college exists for the purpose of educating young men for the Christian ministry among Protestant Nonconformists, & is open to all without further theological or denominational test. The course of study extends over four years, & is intended to combine the liberal training of a University college with the more distinctive features of a Theological school. Pecuniary rewards of considerable value are placed by the Presbyterian Board within the reach of every deserving student; & those who have made substantial progress towards graduation, & who desire to continue their studies elsewhere, are provided with scholarships to enable them to do so. Numerous bursaries are also offered to students by a committee of the Independents & other bodies, being trustees of funds for educational purposes. Principal & Professor of Classics, Walter J. Evans M.A. Oxon.; Professor of Theology, Rev. D. E. Jones M.A. Glas.; Prof. of Hebrew & Hellenistic Greek, Rev. Philemon Moore M.A. Lond.; Medical attendant, James Rowlands F.R.C.S. Eng.

Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School, Church street.-This ancient institution was founded by letters patent of Queen Elizabeth, dated 1576. The original school-house was built in Priory street, on the site now occupied by the Infirmary, from which place it was removed to a more suitable site in 1850. In 1879 the old foundation was reorganized as a first-grade school, under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners. The New School, completed in 1883, stands in its own grounds overlooking the town. Attached are large cricket & football grounds. The main building, of local stone, with dressings throughout of Forest of Dean stone, consists of a schoolroom 55 feet long by 22 feet wide & is feet high; there are also three large class rooms & an entrance hall & lavatory, which latter has been also fitted up as a chemical laboratory. The present premises will hold 150 boys, but are so built as to be capable of extension westward. The headmaster has a large boarding house & there is a gymnasium, 50 feet long by 25 feet wide, supplied with apparatus, which is open at stated hours to every member of the school. There are three departments, viz.: the Classical Side, the Modern Side & the Preparatory Side. In 1894 the school was brought under the operation of the Intermediate Education Act. Head Master, Ed. S. Allen M.A. late open scholar of St. Catherine’s College, Cambridge, who is assisted by a strong staff of university men & others.

Carmarthen High School for Girls (The), Wellfield road, the Lord Bishop of St. David’s, president of the council; Rev. Thomas Rees Walters M.A. vicar of St. David's, sec.; Miss Jordan LL.A. principal.

The School of Art in Church lane, but previously in Parade road, was transferred in 1891 to new buildings of brick with freestone dressings, erected at a cost of £1,400, & consisting of an elementary room, antique & modelling rooms, master's private room & cloak rooms &c. The school is supported by a grant from the County Council of £100 a year, & there are at present 180 pupils attending the classes; Mr. William Jones, master, certificated in advanced drawing, painting & architecture.

A School Board of 7 members was formed 13 Jan. 1871; Thos. Walters, Quay street, clerk to the board; John James, Mansel street, school attendance officer. The board meet at the Town hall the last Tuesday in each month at 8 p.m.

Board School, Johnstown (mixed), built in 1847, for 117 children; average attendance, 93.

Board School, Quay street (mixed), built in 1883, for 100 children; average attendance, 110.

Board School, Pentrepoth, enlarged in 1894, for 310 boys, 220 girls & 160 infants; average attendance, 256 boys, 155 girls & 145 infants.

Carmarthen National & Practising School, Catherine st. built in 1848—9, for 600 boys, girls & infants; average attendance, 149 boys, 106 girls & 89 infants.

St. Peter’s National, Priory street, built in 1870, for 200 boys, 115 girls & 150 infants; average attendance, 100 boys, 120 girls & 135 infants.

St. Mary’s Catholic (mixed), Mill street, for 60 children; average attendance, 37.

Kelly's Directory of South Wales (1895)

Surnames Found in Carmarthen

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Jones1,42111.99
2Davies1,25010.55
3Thomas1,0598.94
4Evans8497.17
5Lewis6975.88
6Williams5204.39
7Rees3002.53
8Phillips2111.78
9Griffiths2071.75
10Richards2031.71
11James1711.44
12Morgan1641.38
13Morris1601.35
14Edwards1541.30
15Jenkins1481.25
16Lloyd1361.15
17Hughes1271.07
18Harries1080.91
19Harris860.73
20Bowen800.68
21Howells790.67
22Smith560.47
23Llewellyn540.46
24Owens470.40
25Morgans470.40
26Elias450.38
27Rogers450.38
28Daniel440.37
29Arthur440.37
30Jeremy430.36
31George410.35
32John400.34
33Francis370.31
34Powell350.30
35Walters320.27
36Vaughan320.27
37Nicholas320.27
38Samuel300.25
39Roberts290.24
40Howell280.24
41Price270.23
42Owen270.23
43White260.22
44Johns250.21
45Charles220.19
46Clarke190.16
47Gower190.16
48Scourfield190.16
49Stephens180.15
50Mathias180.15
51Beynon180.15
52Pugh170.14
53Lodwick160.14
54Wilkins160.14
55Jeffreys160.14
56Humphreys160.14
57Bevan150.13
58Cooper150.13
59Barnett150.13
60Isaac150.13
61Hancock150.13
62Hill150.13
63Adams150.13
64Rodgers140.12
65Spurrell140.12
66Miles140.12
67Hopkins140.12
68Parry140.12
69Marks130.11
70Tucker120.10
71Footman120.10
72Brigstocke120.10
73Palmer120.10
74Hearder120.10
75Hodges120.10
76Walker110.09
77Robinson110.09
78Andrews110.09
79Bona110.09
80Jordan110.09
81Stokes110.09
82Peters110.09
83Fisher100.08
84Treharne100.08
85Tyler100.08
86Cairns100.08
87Lynch100.08
88Murphy100.08
89King100.08
90Watkins90.08
91Bright90.08
92Dyke90.08
93Barry90.08
94Martin90.08
95Anthony90.08
96Bagnall90.08
97Joseph90.08
98Palleson90.08
99Puddicombe90.08
100Ladd90.08