Ystrad Fflur Genealogical Records

Ystrad Fflur Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Ystrad Fflur Baptism Registers (1750-1873)

Name index linked to original images of the baptism registers of Ystrad Fflur. Records document parent's names and date of baptism and/or birth.

FreeBMD Births (1837-1957)

An index to births registered at the central authority for England & Wales. The index provides the area where the birth was registered, mother's maiden name from September 1911 and a reference to order a birth certificate.

British Army Birth Index (1761-2005)

An index to births registered to British Army personal at home and abroad.

Birth Notices from The Times (1983-2003)

An index to over 100,000 birth and christening notices from The London Times.

Ystrad Fflur Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2005)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Ystrad Fflur Marriage Registers (1750-1926)

The Marriage registers of Ystrad Fflur, document marriages 1750 to 1926. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status, residence and signature.

UK Divorce Records (1858-1911)

Digital images of documents from civil divorce cases. The cases cover both the cause of the case and the outcome, such as division of property and visitation rights. These records also contain details of illegitimate children. Cases can be searched by a name index.

FreeBMD Marriages (1837-1961)

An index to marriages registered at the central authority for England & Wales. To March 1912 only the area of registration and name of one party is given. From then on, the spouse's surname is also given. Provides a reference, which can be used to order a marriage certificate with more details.

British Army Marriage Index (1796-2005)

An index to marriages registered for British Army personal at home and abroad.

Ystrad Fflur Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Ystrad Fflur Burial Registers (1875-1940)

Burial records for people buried at Ystrad Fflur between 1875 and 1940. Lists the deceased's name, residence and age.

St Mary, Ystrad Fflur Burial Records (1750-1920)

An index of burials recorded at St Mary, Ystrad Fflur_. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of burial, age (where available) and occasionally other notes.

St Mary, Ystrad Fflur Burials (1679-1700)

Burial records covering those buried at St Mary (in Tregaron Reg), Ystrad Fflur_. This resource is an index and may not include all the details that were recorded in the burial registers from which they were extracted.

FreeBMD Deaths (1837-1964)

An index to deaths registered at the central authority for England and Wales. To 1866, only the locality the death was registered in was listed. Age was listed until 1969, when the deceased's date of birth was listed. Provides a reference to order a death certificate, which has further details.

Ystrad Fflur Church Records

Ystrad Fflur Parish Registers (1750-1940)

The parish registers of Ystrad Fflur are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths. Their records can assist tracing a family as far back as 1750.

Cardiganshire Parish Registers (1633-1980)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though extremely useful to the present. Their records can assist tracing a family as far back as 1633.

Wales Parish Registers (1914-2013)

The parish registers of Wales are a collection of books documenting baptisms, marriages and burials from 1914 to 2013.

Wales Parish Registers (1817-1934)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though useful to the present also.

The Welsh Church Year Book (1929)

Important information relating to the church, including jurisdictions and names of ministers, archdeacons etc.

Ystrad Fflur Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1881 British Census (1881)

The 1881 census provides details on an individual's age, residence and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows for searches on multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

British Phone Books (1880-1984)

Directories containing over 275,000,000 entries. As well as name, address and phone number, occupations are often recorded. A useful census substitute.

Ystrad Fflur Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Welsh Probate Index & Images (1521-1858)

An index to most surviving wills, administrations and inventories proved in Wales' six ecclesiastical courts and the Peculiar of Hawarden. Most documents are available to view online.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (PPV) (1384-1858)

A index to testators whose will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. They principally cover those who lived in the lower two thirds of Britain, but contain wills for residents of Scotland, Ireland, British India and other countries. A copy of each will may be purchased for digital download.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (Subscription) (1384-1858)

An index and digital images of PCC wills, available on a subscription basis.

Wales Probate Abstracts (1544-1858)

Abstracts detailing names, properties and other details recorded in wills proved in Welsh diocese.

Newspapers Covering Ystrad Fflur

Journal of The Ceredigion Historical Society (2002-2004)

A journal containing historical articles and book reviews. It includes society notes. It is mostly in English but there is some Welsh-language content.

Publications of The South Wales Record Society (1987-1994)

A journal publishing historical sources relating to South Wales, with introductory texts, indexes and illustrations.

Journal of The Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society (1950-2001)

A journal containing historical articles and book reviews. It includes society notes. It is mostly in English but there is some Welsh-language content.

West Wales Historical Records (1911-1927)

Various volumes of The Historical Society of West Wales' journal, which include transcripts, indices and abstracts of numerous records such as hearth tax returns, parish registers, marriage licences and wills.

Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society Transactions (1911-1938)

An English-language academic journal containing articles on historical and archaeological topics.

Ystrad Fflur Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Ystrad Fflur Cemeteries

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Maritime Memorials (1588-1950)

Several thousand transcribe memorials of those connected with the nautical occupations.

Rail & Canal Photographs Catalog (1880-1970)

A searchable database of photographs relating to railways and canals in Britain.

Rail & Canal Monuments (1800-1950)

Details of monuments and plaques related to canals and railways. Contains some photographs.

Ystrad Fflur Directories & Gazetteers

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1923)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1910)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1901)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory, South Wales (1895)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory of Monmouthshire & S Wales (1895)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

England & Wales Criminal Registers (1791-1892)

This collection lists brief details on 1.55 million criminal cases in England and Wales between 1791 and 1892. Its primary use is to locate specific legal records, which may give further details on the crime and the accused. Details may include the accused's age, nature of crime, location of trial and sentence. Early records can contain a place of birth.

Old Bailey Online (1674-1913)

A database of almost 200,000 fully transcribed criminal cases. Access to original documents is also provided. Records may provide ages and place of birth.

Ystrad Fflur Taxation Records

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Index to Death Duty Registers (1796-1903)

An index to wills and administrations that incurred a death duty tax. The index can be used to order documents that give a brief abstract of the will and details on the duty. It can be used as a make-shift probate index.

Index to the Royalist Composition Papers (A-F) (1646-1656)

Index to personal names listed in the Royalist Composition Papers that dealt with the estates of royalists.

Ystrad Fflur Land & Property Records

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem (1236-1291)

Abstracts of records detailing the estates and families of deceased tenants from the reigns of Henry III and Edward I.

NLW Manuscript Transcripts (1200-2000)

A searchable database of thousands of transcribed and abstracted manuscripts, largely pertaining to land.

Landowners of England & Wales (1873)

A list of owners of above one acre of land in England & Wales. Lists a landowner's residence, acreage and estimated gross yearly rental.

Ystrad Fflur Occupation & Business Records

Swansea Gazette & Daily Shipping Register (1909-1910)

A liberal newspaper that predominantly covered mercantile and shipping matters. It did not contain family announcements. Each edition has been indexed and digitised.

Smuggling on the West Coast (1690-1867)

An introduction to smuggling on the west coast of Britain & the Isle of Man, with details of the act in various regions.

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

UK Medical Registers (1859-1959)

Books listing doctors who were licensed to operate in Britain and abroad. Contains doctor's residencies, qualification and date of registration.

Railway Employment Records (1833-1963)

A rich collection of records documenting those who worked for railway companies that were later absorbed by the government. Records include: staff registers, station transfers, pensions, accident records, apprentice records, caution books, and memos. Records may include date of birth, date of death and name of father.

Ystrad Fflur School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Ystrad Fflur

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Ystrad Fflur Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Burke's Landed Gentry of Britain & Ireland (1885)

Lineages of Britain and Ireland's untitled landed families; supplemented with biographical sketches.

Ystrad Fflur Military Records

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls (1914-1920)

Index and original images of over 5 million medal index cards for British soldiers It can be searched by individual's name, Coprs, Unit and Regiment. Due to the loss of many WWI service records, this is the most complete source for British WWI soldiers

British Army WWI Service Records (1914-1920)

This rich collection contains contains records for 1.9 million non-commissioned officers and other ranks who fought in WWI. Due to bomb damage in WWI, around 60% of service records were lost. Documents cover: enlistment, medical status, injuries, conduct, awards and discharge. A great deal of genealogical and biographical documentation can be found in these documents, including details on entire families, physical descriptions and place of birth.

Silver War Badges (1914-1920)

An index to nearly 900,000 military personnel who were awarded the Silver War Badge for sustaining injures. Records include rank, regimental number, unit, dates of enlistment and discharge, and reason for discharge.

Ystrad Fflur Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Aliens Entry Books (1794-1921)

An un-indexed collection of over 100,000 documents of correspondence and other documents of the Home Office and the Aliens Office. Contains a great deal of information on aliens and those who applied for naturalisation.

Ystrad Fflur Histories & Books

Journal of The Ceredigion Historical Society (2002-2004)

A journal containing historical articles and book reviews. It includes society notes. It is mostly in English but there is some Welsh-language content.

Publications of The South Wales Record Society (1987-1994)

A journal publishing historical sources relating to South Wales, with introductory texts, indexes and illustrations.

Journal of The Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society (1950-2001)

A journal containing historical articles and book reviews. It includes society notes. It is mostly in English but there is some Welsh-language content.

West Wales Historical Records (1911-1927)

Various volumes of The Historical Society of West Wales' journal, which include transcripts, indices and abstracts of numerous records such as hearth tax returns, parish registers, marriage licences and wills.

Ceregidon Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in Ceregidon.

Biographical Directories Covering Ystrad Fflur

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Church of England Clergy Database (1500-1835)

A database of CoE clergy, giving details of their education of service. Contains references to source documents. Also contains profiles of various church institutions.

Ystrad Fflur Maps

Maps of Cardiganshire (1610-1890)

A collection of digitalised maps covering the county.

Ordnance Survey Maps of Wales (1868-1954)

An interactive map featuring four OS map editions published between 1868 and 1954. To load a map select the menu tab on the far right, select the edition you wish to view and zoom in to a locality.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Speed's Maps of Britain (1612)

County and national maps covering the British Isles, extracted from John Speed's landmark work, Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain.

Ystrad Fflur Reference Works

Wales Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in Wales.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Ystrad Fflur Information

Ecclesiastical Juristiction:

  • Canterbury province
    • St David's diocese
      • Cardigan archdeaconry
        • Upper Ayron deanery

    Historical Description

    CARON UWCH CLAWDD (or Strata Florida) is a parish and village in the county of Cardigan, with a station (2 miles from the village) on the Manchester and Milford railway, and is 6 miles north-by-east from Tregaron and 12 south-east from Aberystwyth: it is partly in the hundred of Ilar and partly in that of Penarth, in the petty sessional division of Penarth, county court district of Lampeter and union of Tregaron, and in the rural deanery of Ultra Aeron, archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St. David’s. Thu church of St. Mary, which stands within the ancient cemetery of the abbey, is a plain building of stone, consisting of nave only and has one bell; it was restored in 1875, and affords 120 sittings. The register dates from the year 1750. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £145, net £140, in the gift of Cornelius Le Brun Powell esq. and held since 1884 by the Rev. Evan Jones, of Queen’s College, Birmingham. There are Calvinistic, Methodist and Baptist chapels. The Cistercian abbey of Ystrad Flur, called at a later period, Strata Florida, appears to have been originally founded some time before 1091, and possibly by Rhys ap Tewdor, prince of South Wales, but during the Transitional and Early English periods it was rebuilt on a new site, and its endowments augmented by Rhys ap Gruffyd. In 1295, or thereabouts, the abbey was destroyed by fire. The excavations here were begun in Sept. 1847, by J. Davies esq. of Pant-y-fedwen, by permission of Col. Powell, of Nanteos, and certain portions of the site within the chancel and south transept were then uncovered for the visit to the abbey of the Cambrian Archaeological Association, but the systematic exploration of the ruins was not undertaken till 1886: in June of that year, Mr. Stephen W. Williams begun the work carried on with much success during the years, 1887—8, and resulting in many highly interesting discoveries; the portions of the monastery uncovered by Mr. Williams comprise the cruciform church, the sacristy, chapter house and cloister garth; traces of fire were met with in every direction, but the lower portions of the piers of the nave arcades were found in situ, and numerous carved capitals, including one of the early fabric of the 11th century, bosses, a monk’s head and portions of a reredos, altar tombs and effigies, together with fragments of exquisite and unique floor tiles, were recovered and have been preserved; east of the south transept was the burying place of the monks, and here a number of grave slabs were met with, some of which retained small cross-shaped headstones, ornamented with Celtic knot work patterns; the church, when perfect, consisted of choir, transepts, each with three eastern chapels, nave of seven bays, aisles, and a central tower; the cloisters and domestic buildings being on the south side: the total length of the church was 213 feet, and of the transept, 117 feet 3 inches, and of the nave, 132 feet 6 inches; the width across nave and aisles being about 60 feet. The principal portion now standing is a part of the west front, including the west doorway, a deeply recessed semicircular arch, with five orders of bold round moldings, banded at intervals with fillets terminating outwards in scrolls or foliage; the west end of the south aisle also remains, with a single pointed window. The cemetery is said to have been of great extent, and to have contained 39 yew trees, some of which still flourish; leaden coffins have been dug up within the area. Within the abbey and its precincts many Welsh princes and several noted bards were interred; in 1806 and 1807 two silver seals, one the seal of an abbot, and another bearing the arms of the abbey were ploughed up here. The Earl of Lisburne, who is lord of the manor, and Cornelius le Brun Powell esq. are the principal landowners. The area is 24,661 acres of land and 201 of water; rateable value, £2,750; the population in 1891 was 559.

    A School Board of 7 members was formed 1 November, 1875, William Ball, clerk.

    Board school, for 40 children; average attendance, 22.

    Kelly's Directory of South Wales (1895)

    YSTRADFLUR.

    “Strateflur upon Tyne,” says Leland, “is twenty-four miles of montaine ground from Brekenauc. It is set round about with montaines not far distant, except on the west parte, wher Diffrin Tyne is. Many hilles thereabout hath been well woddid, as evidently by old rotes apperith, but now in them is almost no woode. The causies be these; First the wood cut down was never copisid; and this hath beene a great cause of destruction of wood thorough Wales. Secondly, after cutting down of woddys the gottys hath so bytten the young spring that it never grew but lyke shrubbes. Thirddely, men for the nonys destroied the great woddis that thei shuld not harborow theves. Al the montaine ground bytwixt the river Alen and Strateflure longgeth to Stratefleere, and is almoste for wilde pastures, and breding ground, in so much that everi man there about puttith in bestes, as many as they wille without paiying of mony. Of the 12 miles from Strateflur to Llangyric 8 be montainous ground longging to Strateflur, al for pasture. At this 6 miles from Strateflure towards Buelth is montayne ground for pasture, and longgith to Strateflure Abbay; but the pastures of thes hilles be fre to the inhabitantes, as well as al other montaine pasture longging to Stratefiere.” Ystradflur, or the plain near the flur, is called also Strata Florida, a name of the same import, as flur signifies blooming, and most probably the river ran through a country very luxuriant, which, when contrasted with the dreary barren hills encompassing it, might fairly claim that title. The word flur is used in this sense by David ap Gwillym, who flourished about the year 1400. He says,

    Digon i’r byd o degwch

    Eigyr bryd flur, a brad flwch,

    that is, “Enough of beauty, for the world is the blooming countenance of the nymph of ready deceit.” And again he says,

    Arglwys bert flur y glasbawr,

    that is, “And the purely gay bloom of the green pasture.”

    There are not above two or three dwellings in this hamlet; the soil is in general gravelly, and most friendly to tillage.

    The church is a paltry edifice, erected in the cemetery of the abbey, which stands to the south, proudly overtopping its contemptible rival. The Nanteos family present the minister to this chapel; and the Rev. Thomas Davies was the last presented. He is a man well respected, and well attended in his chapel.

    On the right of the entrance is the font, a plain octangular bason, supported by a circular column, standing on three steps.

    On the south side of the altar is a very handsome marble monument, on which is inscribed,

    “This humble stone was placed here in memory of Dame Anne Lloyd Daughter of William Powell late of Nanteos Esq. and Averina his wife. She was first married to Richard Stedman of Strata Florida Esq. by whom she had two daughters, who died young, and with their Father buried in this chapel. She was afterwards relict of Sir Herbert Lloyd of Peterwell Bart. She departed this life the second day of August 1778 in the 76th year of her age. And was interred near this place, in well founded hopes of a joyfull Resurrection. Her virtues were eminent: Her Piety was without Ostentation, Hypocrisy, or Superstition. Her humanity and benevolence were general and conspicuous, and her Charity appear by the heartfelt lamentations of the poor and needy. To the above Truths may be added that her tenderness and warm affection for her relations will ever be remembered with gratitude and reverence. I! Decus. I! Nostrum.”

    The old churchyard, as it is called, is a very large plot of ground, surrounded with a stone wall, but the present one is about two acres. In it are several tombstones. The extent of the old cemetery is said to be one hundred and twenty acres, and leaden coffins are frequently dug up within that space; but what tends most to confirm this is, that so much of the abbey land does not pay tythe. Four and twenty yew trees were once standing in it, though Leland says thirty-nine, of which but few remain, and tradition says, that Davydd ab Gwylym is buried under one of them.

    But Ystradflur was most noted for its once celebrated abbey, the rival of Conway for the favour and munificence of the Welch princes. It was founded by Rhys ap Gruffyth, 1164, but to what order of monks dedicated is not precisely agreed upon among our antiquaries. In Stevens’s edition of Dugdale’s Monasticon, printed 1718, it says, “Stratflure Abbey, in Cardiganshire, founded Anno 1164.

    The charter of Rees Sudwal, Prince of Wales, sets forth, that he built a monastery called Stratflure, and endowed it with many possessions, which he confirmed in the

    STRATA FLORIDA.STRATA FLORIDA.

    year 1184, before many of his army in the church of St. Bridget at Raidr. Then it enumerates and describes the said donations. King Henry lid’s charter confirms the same, and that of King Edward I. grants leave to the abbot to rebuild the monastery, which had been burnt down in the war against the said King’s will, yet upon condition, that to avoid dangers, the woods be cut down and the ways mended.”

    In an old edition of Dugdale’s Monasticon, printed in 1693, it says, “Stratflure, in Cardiganshire. Founded and endowed with divers Lands by Reese Prince of South Wales. The estate of this House (called also Strata Florida) was confirmed by King Henry II. and King Edw. I. [valued at £118 7s. 3d. per Annum].”

    Camden says it was for Cluniacs; but Leland and Tanner unite with Dugdale in saying it was devoted to the Gstercian monks. In the fifth volume of Leland’s Itinerary, published by Heame, page 14, it says, “Strateflure, an Abbay of White Monkes on Tine”; and again, page 77, “The chirch of Strateflere is larg, side ilid and crosse ilid. The fundation of the body of the chirch was made to have been 60 foote lengger then it is now. By is a large cloyster. The fratry and infirmitori be now mere ruins. The caemiteri wheren the cunteri about doth bury is very large and meanely waullid with stoone. In it be 39 great hue trees. The base court or camp afore the abbay is veri fair and large.” The present structure was built, therefore, according to Dugdale, by the Abbot, in the reign of Edward I., in the year 1294, and stands in a delightful situation; but the structure raised by Rhys ap Gruffyth stood about two miles from this, in a south-west direction, on a plain near the river Flur, whence it took its name; and where still remains an old building, now used as a barn, called hen monach log, or “the Old Abbey.” Perhaps it might be a part of the original edifice which escaped the conflagration. This also seems to me to explain a mutilated marginal note, in folio 75, of Leland’s Itinerary, which is “Stratfler of sum caullid, because............. bytwixt it and Flere Brokes of sum.............. it stode in the.......” and which I think might thus be restored. “Stratfler of sum called, because [of the plain] bytwixt it, and Flere Brokes, of sum [because formerly] it stode in the [plain near Flere Brokes. ]” Something of this kind most probably Leland had heard from the monk of Stratfler, whom he mentions he had interrogated respecting the antiquities of Cardiganshire; and he might then have made it a note on the margin of his book. The present structure was once the chief depot of whatever was civilized. It had its hospitia and its cells established in various places. I have already mentioned that it divided with the Abbey at Conway the pious and honourable charge of depositing and carrying on the records of the principality. Several copies of the chronicles written by Caradoc, of Llancarvan, were preserved here; and the successions of the princes recorded from the year 1156 till 1270, the moment of Llewelyn ap Gruffyth’s unhappy fall. At that period these reverend persons quitted that sequestered abode, and were the bearers of their prince’s remonstrance to the English throne; and interceded with the Archbishops of Canterbury and York for their good offices in relieving him from the insults and oppressions of the Lords Marchers.

    Llewelyn ap Jorwerth, in the year 1237, invited all the lords and barons of Wales to Ystrad Flur, and required from them the oaths of fidelity and allegiance to his son David. Those who now visit the spot will scarcely credit, at first sight, that the whole country round could furnish accommodation for such a company, or that this could be the theatre of such ceremonies, as are solemnized with us under the awful roof of Westminster. But when they call to mind the influence of superstition, and the immense territorial possessions of the abbey, they will have no cause to wonder. Llewelyn ap Jorwerth was not buried here, but at Conway. During the period from the dissolution to the present time this once proud edifice has been rapidly decaying, all that now remains is the western entrance of the church, a very fine specimen of the Saxon arch, and a Gothic window of the south aisle. A lofty pile, which once formed the western angle of the north transept, seems as if it had not long to survive its kindred pile. Some of the outhouses still remain. About ten years ago a very fine silver seal was found in part of the land once occupied by the abbey, by a boy who was ploughing. It was about the size of a crown piece, and circular. The boy sold it to an itinerant Jew for a few shillings. On it was engraved the arms of the abbey. About three years ago another seal was found belonging to an abbot of Ystradflur, and on it was the Virgin and Child. Its shape was the Gothic elipse, and it was made of silver.

    The celebrated bard of this county, Davydd ab Gwillym, was buried here, and an epitaph placed on his tomb, the production of some bard who deeply felt the loss of this great genius; it is as follows:

    Dafydd, gwiw awenydd gwrdd,

    Ai yma’th roed dan goed gwyrdd?

    Dan lasbren hoyw ywen hardd,

    Lle’i claddwyd, y cuddiwyd cerdd!

    Glas dew ywen, glan Eos—Deifi,

    Mac Dafydd yn agos!

    Yn y pridd mae’r gerdd ddiddos,

    Diddawn in’ bob dydd a nos.”

    King Edward I. granted the sum of seventy-eight pounds sterling to the convent of Stratflur, for the damages suffered by the late war and conflagration.

    Owain Gwynedd, a bard of the sixteenth century, passing by the remains of this venerable edifice, could not help lamenting the loss of its former splendour; he says:

    Mae dialedd ryfedd am ryfig—buchedd,

    Bechod gwyr eglwysig;

    Mawr yw cur y mur cerrig

    Am watwor Duw—matter dig.

    In the Gentleman’s Magazine for the year 1752, are the engravings of two coins dug up at this abbey, and then in the possession of James Philips, Esq., of Blaenpant. One was a Flemish coin, brought over, as supposed, in the time of Queen Elizabeth; the other a Venetian piece of Aloysius Mocenicus, who was Doge of that republic, A. D. 1560.1

    The architecture of the abbey was the circular arch, as appears by the western door, a print of the abbey, by Buck, shewing the window of the north transept before it fell, and from several freestones curved frequently dug up in the ruins, once formed arches,2 The walls had glazed tiles affixed to them in the style of the paintings we meet with in old missals, marked with quatrefoils; and these are frequently dug up, as are the tiles of the pavement, which consisted of inter secting circles, &c. Painted glass has also been found; indeed it seems that no expense was spared to render this a most magnificent building. Freestones are dug up which were ornamental, having circles touching each other carved on them.

    Guttain Owain, a herald, bard, and historian, resided chiefly at Ystradflur monastery, and flourished about A. D. 1480. Philip Brydydd, who lived in the year 1250, was a Cardiganshire bard, but where he resided is not known.

    Sisillus was abbot of Ystradflur in the time of Giraldus Cambrensis; and Giraldus informs us that he deposited his library of books at this abbey in the reign of King John, previous to his quitting the country for Rome, in order to establish his claim to the bishoprick of St. David’s.

    This abbey was honoured as a place of interment for many of the Welsh princes. Among others were the following:

    In the year 1176 died Cadell, the son of Gruffydd ap Rhys, and brother to Prince Rhys, after a long illness, and was honourably buried at Ystradflur.

    In the year 1184 died Howel ab Jevan, Lord of Arustly, and was buried at Ystradflur.

    In the year 1190 Owen ab Rhys died, and was buried here.

    In the year 1196 died Prince Rhys ab Gruffydd, and was buried here.

    In the year 1202, and on St. James’s day, died Gruffydd, another son of Prince Rhys, who followed his father’s steps, and succeeded him in martial prowess, as well as in government; and was buried here with great solemnity.

    In 1204 Hywel ap Rhys was buried by the side of his brother Gruffydd, at Ystradflur. This Hywel being blind was slain through the machinations of another brother.

    In 1209 died Mallt, or Maud de Bruce, the wife of Gruffydd ab Rhys; and was interred by her husband in a monk’s cowl.

    In 1210 died Isabel, daughter of Richard Clare, Earl of Hereford, and wife to William Gam, Lord of Gower, and was buried at this abbey.

    In 1221 Young Rhys, son of Gruffydd ab Rhys, died, and was buried at Ystradflur.

    In 1230 Maelgwn, son of Prince Rhys, died, and was buried at Ystradflur.

    In 1235 Owen, son of Gruffydd ab Rhys, died, and was buried by his brother Rhys, at Stratflur.

    I cannot help inserting here an elegant address to the Almighty, written by the elder Llewelyn of Meurig.

    Llewelyn Fychan ap Ll’n. Abad Ystradfflur.

    Llywelyn gochap Meurig hen ai cant.

    O. L. E. D.

    Gredaf ytt Jesu fab y croyw dad

    Creawer hael llywiawdr haul a lleuad

    Credalun nef gun naf ac ynad

    Crair oddilys Fair ddeules fwriad

    Canwaith ragoriaith pob rhyw gariad

    Cannorthwyaist figeli gwliad

    A’r awr hon etton Duw rewattad

    Rhedon o’r diwedd ith wledd ath wlad

    Y nerthaist fyfy megis neirthiad

    Am arglwydd-lywym a mur gwleddwlad

    Am wr cresdrefu a’m vawr Ystrad

    Fflur ai phennadus a’i modir mad

    Llywelyn wiwbarch lluniaidd Abad

    Fycha ngwr difau garwy dyfiad

    Llin llyw cynnefin llew cynnifiad

    Llywelyn arall dewyddgall dad

    Heiliaist ddofydd gwynn hwyl bryn a brad

    Haint a’i arwyddion hynt da roddiad

    Anobaith fuam am iawn Abad

    A’th nerth a’n diffyrth a’th wyrth wyrthiad

    Clywed a wnaethost dost destuniad

    Fy lief hyd y nef ehud nofiad

    Ac estyn hoedl heb gus dyniad

    Ym llayaidd obaith llaw-rodd Abad

    The following is a Translation of the same.

    Due to thee is my confidence, Jesus, Son of the Father of Purity, the Creator, and bountiful Lord of the celestial luminaries, faithful Ruler of the universe, sacred relict of the kind-intentioned Virgin; a hundred proofs hast thou favoured me with, of thy inexhaustible Love, on an hundred occasions hast thou hastened to my relief, Lord of the region of Liberality; and now also, merciful Deity, have we fled to thee for succour; (may we finally be admitted to thy blissful feasts and to thy eternal regions, ) and now also hast thou succoured me, as by a miraculous display of thy Power, when I fled to thee for protection in behalf of my Lord and guide, the bulwark of the land of Hospitality, in behalf of the preserver of Order, the Morning Star of Strata Florida, its chieftain, its modeller, its virtuous director, its mild Abbot, the praise-worthy Llewelyn Vaughan; superiorly happy in the gentleness of his temper and the vigour of his mind; happy in the loftiness of his stature and his high descent, the noble offspring of another generous Llewelyn, the lion-like protector of an enraptured country. God of Purity, whose influence sheds the Dew of Health on every region, and affords protection against every malignity; thou hast dispelled the gloom of contagion, and banished all its inauspicious symptoms; thou hast beamed the rays of goodness on us, and the splendour of health. At the apparent approach of the death of a righteous and virtuous Abbot, we were overshadowed with the clouds of Despair, but thy merciful interposition, thy miraculous power, effectually enlightened, consoled, and succoured us. On surges of air the cry of my distress had rapidly floated to the Heavens, and reached the pitying ear, thou heardest my heart-born plaints, and without pains, and without sorrow, thou hast benignantly revived our hopes, and enlightened the genial days of the peerless Abbot, whose glory is the charitable exploits of the hand of Liberality.

    This was written by the elder Llewelyn, of Meurig, sumamed the Red, to the Abbot of Strata Florida, (Llewelyn Vaughan) on his recovery from a dangerous fit of illness.

    Llewelyngoch ab Meurig hen, of Nannau, in Merionethshire, flourished from 1330 to 1370.

    The names of three abbots are handed down to us. Sisillus (probably Sitsyllt, or Cecil), held that situation in the time of Giraldus Cambrensis, viz., about the year 1188; Llewelyn Vychan, or Vaughan, about the year 1340; and Richard Tally, who was the last abbot, in the year 1553, enjoyed a pension of forty pounds a year.

    The present mansion was erected by John Stedman, Esq., son of John Stedman, of Staffordshire, Esq., from the ruins of the out-buildings belonging to the abbey. The pedigree of this family is as follows:

    This Richard Stedman left no issue, but bequeathed his estate to his wife’s brother and her heirs, and it is now in the possession of Captain Powell, of Nanteos.

    History and Antiquities of the County of Cardigan (1810) by Samuel Rush Meyrick

    Surnames Found in Ystrad Fflur

    RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
    1Jones19127.60
    2Davies618.82
    3Evans517.37
    4Williams436.21
    5Roberts395.64
    6Lloyd355.06
    7Edwards344.91
    8Thomas213.03
    9Hughes202.89
    10James192.75
    11Morgans172.46
    12Rees172.46
    13Jenkins162.31
    14Morgan142.02
    15Roderick111.59
    16Rogers101.45
    17Lewis81.16
    18Harries71.01
    19Phillips71.01
    20Arch71.01
    21Richards60.87
    22Couch60.87
    23Hopkins60.87
    24Bonnor50.72
    25Pughe50.72
    26Matthews50.72
    27Oliver50.72
    28Goldsworthy40.58
    29Powell40.58
    30Owens30.43
    31Morris30.43
    32Robinson30.43
    33Price20.29
    34Bowen20.29
    35Winter10.14
    36Pugh10.14
    37Newland10.14
    38Bonner10.14
    39Casy10.14

    * Statistics based on the 1881 census