Leeds Genealogical Records

Leeds Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Stourton, St Andrew, Leeds Baptism Records (1898-1910)

Baptism records from people born in and around Leeds between 1898 and 1910. Lists the name of people's parent's and other details.

St Aidan, Leeds Baptism Records (1896-1910)

Baptism registers are the primary source for birth documentation before 1837, though are relevant to the present. They record the date a child was baptised, their parent's names and more.

All Hallows, Leeds Baptism Records (1886-1910)

Name index linked to original images of the baptism registers of All Hallows, Leeds. Records document parent's names and date of baptism and/or birth.

St Hilda, Leeds Baptism Records (1885-1910)

Baptism registers record the baptism of those born in and around St Hilda, Leeds and were subsequently baptised in an Anglican place of worship. They are the primary source of birth details before 1837, though are useful to the present. Records can include name of child, parent's names, residence, occupations and more.

Leeds Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St John & St Barnabas, Leeds Marriages (1934-1935)

The Marriage registers of St John the Evangelist & St Barnabas, Leeds, document marriages 1934 to 1935. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status and residence.

St James, Leeds Marriage Records (1932-1935)

Details on those who married at St James, Leeds between 1932 and 1935. Information given may include parent's names, ages, marital status, abode and more.

St Wilfrid, Leeds Marriage Records (1932-1935)

Marriage registers are the primary source for marital documentation before 1837, though are relevant to the present. They typically the record marital status and residence of the bride and groom.

St Margaret, Leeds Marriage Records (1909-1935)

The Marriage registers of St Margaret, Leeds, document marriages 1909 to 1935. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status, residence and signature.

Leeds Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St Saviour, Leeds Burial Records (1840-1863)

Burial registers record burials that occurred at St Saviour, Leeds. They are the primary source documenting deaths before 1837, though are useful to the present.

St James, Leeds Burial Records (1839-1842)

Burial registers record burials that occurred at St James, Leeds. They are the primary source documenting deaths before 1837, though are useful to the present. Details given may include the deceased's name, residence, age, names of relations, cause of death and more.

St George, Leeds Burial Records (1838-1926)

Records of burial for people buried at St George, Leeds between 1838 and 1926. Details include the deceased's name, residence and age. Some records may contain the names of relations, cause of death and more.

St Mark, Woodhouse Burial Records (1831-1971)

Burial registers record burials that occurred at St Mark, Woodhouse. They are the primary source documenting deaths before 1837, though are useful to the present.

Leeds Church Records

Burmantofts Parish Registers (1851-1935)

The parish registers of Burmantofts are the primary source for birth, marriage and death details before civil registration (1837). A full index to names with original images of the registers are available between 1851 and 1935. Parish registers can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Woodhouse Parish Registers (1824-1971)

The parish registers of Woodhouse are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths. Their records can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Headingley Parish Registers (1813-1953)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though useful to the present also.

Leeds Parish Registers (1572-1935)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though extremely useful to the present. Their records can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Hunslet Parish Registers (1539-1935)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though extremely useful to the present. Their records can assist tracing a family as far back as 1539.

Leeds Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

West Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1672)

A transcription of records naming those who had taxes levied against them for the privilege of owning a hearth.

West Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1672)

A name index to records recording taxes levied against owners of hearths in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Yorkshire Lay Subsidy (1301)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by wapentake or liberty and settlement.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Leeds Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Derbyshire Will Index (1858-1928)

An index to wills, proved by the Derby Probate Registry. Index includes name, residence and year of probate. Contains entries for Yorkshire, Cheshire, Lancashire, Staffordshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and other counties.

North Country Wills (1383-1558)

Transcripts of several hundred wills, contains an index to people named within.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (PPV) (1384-1858)

A index to testators whose will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. They principally cover those who lived in the lower two thirds of Britain, but contain wills for residents of Scotland, Ireland, British India and other countries. A copy of each will may be purchased for digital download.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (Subscription) (1384-1858)

An index and digital images of PCC wills, available on a subscription basis.

Newspapers Covering Leeds

Sheffield Evening Telegraph (1887-1904)

A database allowing full text searches of a newspaper covering local news, family announcements, obituaries, court proceedings, business notices and more in the Sheffield area.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph (1855-1904)

This fully searchable newspaper will provide a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Sheffield district. Includes family announcements.

Huddersfield Chronicle (1850-1900)

A local paper including news from the Huddersfield area, legal & governmental proceedings, family announcements, business notices, advertisements and more.

Bradford Observer (1834-1875)

Local news; notices of births, marriages and deaths; business notices; details on the proceedings of public institutions; adverts and a rich tapestry of other local information from the Bradford district. Every line of text from the newspaper can be searched and images of the original pages viewed.

Leeds Times (1833-1901)

This fully searchable newspaper will provide a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Leeds district. Includes family announcements.

Leeds Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Leeds Cemeteries

Woodhouse General Cemetery, Leeds Cemetery Records (1835-1837)

An index to burials at Woodhouse General Cemetery, Leeds. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of their death or burial and their age.

Hunslet Cemetery, Leeds Cemetery Records (1817-1993)

An index to burials at Hunslet Cemetery, Leeds. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of their death or burial and their age.

West Riding Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of West Riding's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Leeds Directories & Gazetteers

Kelly's Directory of Leeds (1908)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

White's Directory of Leeds & the Clothing District (1894)

A comprehensive gazetteer of the district; to which are appended lists of their residents, trades and occupations.

Kelly's Directory of Leeds, Sheffield and Rotherham (1893)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory of Leeds (1888)

An exhaustive gazetteer, containing details of settlement's history, governance, churches, postal services, public institutions and more. Also contains lists of residents with their occupation and address.

White's Directory of Leeds (1872)

A comprehensive gazetteer of the district; to which are appended lists of their residents, trades and occupations.

Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1486-1503)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Eyre Rolls for Yorkshire (1218-1219)

Transcriptions of pleas brought before a court. They largely concern land disputes.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

Leeds Taxation Records

West Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1672)

A transcription of records naming those who had taxes levied against them for the privilege of owning a hearth.

West Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1672)

A name index to records recording taxes levied against owners of hearths in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Lincolnshire Domesday & Lindsey Survey (1066-1118)

A transcription of the Lincolnshire section of the Domesday Book, which records land ownership, use and value in the late 11th century; and similar survey completed in 1118.

Yorkshire Lay Subsidy (1301)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by wapentake or liberty and settlement.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Leeds Land & Property Records

West Riding Domesday Extracts (1066)

Extracts for West Riding settlements found in the Domesday book. Includes the modern & 11th century place name, land owners and details of later history.

Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1486-1503)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Yorkshire Domesday Records (1086)

An English translation of Yorkshire domesday records. This transcripts details the county's landowners in 1086.

Lincolnshire Domesday & Lindsey Survey (1066-1118)

A transcription of the Lincolnshire section of the Domesday Book, which records land ownership, use and value in the late 11th century; and similar survey completed in 1118.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Leeds Occupation & Business Records

Collieries of The North (1869-1991)

Profiles of collieries in the north of England, with employment statistics, profiles of those who died in the mines and photographs.

Northern Mining Disasters (1705-1975)

Reports of mining distastes, includes lists of the deceased and photographs of monuments.

Smuggling on the East Coast (1600-1892)

An introduction to smuggling on the east coast of England, with details of the act in various regions.

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Yorkshire Rugby Union Commemoration Book (1914-1919)

A searchable book detailing the Yorkshire Rugby Football Union around the time of the Great War. Contains the names of many players and other persons associated with the sport.

Leeds School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Leeds

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Leeds Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

West Riding Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of West Riding's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

The Visitation of Yorkshire: 1584-5 (1000-1585)

Pedigrees compiled from a late 16th century heraldic visitation of Yorkshire. This work records the lineage, descendants and marriages of families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

The Visitation of Yorkshire: 1612 (1000-1612)

Pedigrees compiled from a early 17th century heraldic visitation of Yorkshire. This work records the lineage, descendants and marriages of families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

Leeds Military Records

West Riding Yorkshire Territorials in the Great War (1908-1919)

Three books detailing the unit's history from the period before and during WWI. Also contains a list of members, with dates of service and a roll of honours and awards.

North East War Memorials (1882-1951)

An inventory of memorials commemorating those who served and died in military conflicts.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Roll of Officers of the York and Lancaster Regiment (1756-1884)

Lists of officers by rank, regiment and name.

Officers of The Green Howards (1688-1931)

Biographies of hundreds of men who served as officers in The Green Howards, an infant regiment in the King's Division. Details given include parentage, date of birth, military career and later professional career.

Leeds Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Alien Arrivals in England (1810-1869)

Details on over 600,000 non-British citizens arriving in England. Often includes age and professions. Useful for discerning the origin of immigrants.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Leeds Histories & Books

West Riding Domesday Extracts (1066)

Extracts for West Riding settlements found in the Domesday book. Includes the modern & 11th century place name, land owners and details of later history.

Yorkshire Domesday Records (1086)

An English translation of Yorkshire domesday records. This transcripts details the county's landowners in 1086.

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

North Yorkshire Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in North Yorkshire.

Biographical Directories Covering Leeds

Yorkshire Who's Who (1912)

A listing of the prominent residents of the county of Yorkshire, giving details on family, education, careers, hobbies, associations and more. Also includes details on the county's government officials, military officers, members of parliament, religious leaders and demographics.

Officers of The Green Howards (1688-1931)

Biographies of hundreds of men who served as officers in The Green Howards, an infant regiment in the King's Division. Details given include parentage, date of birth, military career and later professional career.

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Leeds Maps

Maps of Yorkshire (1407-1922)

Digital images of maps covering the county.

Collery Maps of The North (1807-1951)

A number of maps of northern England with the locations of collieries plotted.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Leeds Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Leeds Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

The town of Leeds, situated on the north bank of the river Aire, is one of the most commercial and opulent towns in Yorkshire. It covers an eminence gently rising from that river to the upper end of the town, and falling with an easy slope to the east and west as well as to the south. On the eastern side the town falls into a deep valley, through which a rivulet runs, having a number of dyeing-houses on its banks. Still this rivulet does not form the boundary of the town, as there are a considerable number of houses, and several streets, lanes, and alleys beyond its eastern banks. The town of Leeds is in general well built, almost entirely of brick; but its different quarters form, one with another, a striking contrast. The houses upon the rivulet just mentioned are mean, and the streets and lanes, dirty, crooked, and irregular, emitting disagreeable smells from the dyeing-houses and the different manufactures.

The southern edge of the town is almost as disagreeable; and though it has some good houses, it has been said in a great measure to have the appearance of a prison. But the middle and western parts display fine streets and several elegant buildings. The breadth of the town from north to south is not much more than half a mile; but its length from east to west, is not less than a mile and a half. It is divided nearly into two equal parts by Briggate and the marketplace, which open into each other, running nearly in a line from south to north. Briggate, the principal street in Leeds, is about 500 yards in length, and thirty in breadth. In this the cloth-market was formerly held on Tuesdays and Saturdays, at an early hour in the morning. At the upper end of Briggate, is the Moot-hall, the front of stone, supported by columns and arches, and the arms of the town, in relievo, between two maces, the ensigns of mayoralty. The fleece in the escutcheon, designates the woollen manufacture, supported by the birds of Minerva, in memory of Sir John Saville, afterwards created Lord Saville, the first honorary alderman when the town and parish were incorporated, in the second year of Charles I. In a niche over the arms of the town is a statue of Queen Anne in white marble, by Carpenter, the gift of Alderman Milner.

From the Moot-hall to the marketplace the street is divided by a row of buildings into two; that to the east is the shambles, and the other is called the back of the shambles. The marketplace, or as it is usually called, Cross-parish, is a very spacious street, having the large market-cross at the east end. At the top of the marketplace is the Head Row, so called from its rising with an easy ascent to the crown of the hill, on the southern declivity of which the town is situated.

At the upper end of New-street, entirely built by John Harrison, Esq. the great benefactor of Leeds, is the churchyard of St. John’s. A little further to the north is Mill-Hill, at the extremity of the town, where the castle formerly stood, and where there are now a large house and gardens; this is one of the most delightful situations in Leeds. In the middle of the town, to the east and west of Briggate, are several good streets and large and handsome houses. But the western part displays the greatest degree of elegance. Here is a spacious square, environed with handsome brick houses, which being built at different times, has no general name. The east side is called Park-row; the west is denominated East-parade; and the north side the South-parade: the south side is formed by the Mixed-Cloth Hall and the general infirmary. The centre is partly laid out in gardens, but the largest proportion is used as a tenter-ground. Park-square is also composed of elegant modern houses, and the centre is laid out in walks and planted with shrubs. On the south side of this square is St. Paul’s church, a very modern and handsome structure of stone, having been opened on Christmas-day, 1794. To the south of Park-square, and separated from it by the new road to Kirkstall is Park-place, a row of very handsome houses fronting the south, and commanding a fine view of the river Aire and the neighbouring hills. Leeds contains five churches, viz. St. Peter’s, St. John’s, St. James’s, Trinity church, and St. Paul’s. St. Peter’s, the parish church, is a spacious, plain, and venerable pile of considerable antiquity; but the name of its founder, and the time of its foundation, are unknown. A church here is certainly mentioned in the Doomsday Survey. St. Peter’s is 165 feet in length, and 97 in breadth, built in the form of a cross, with a tower or steeple 96 feet in height, rising from the centre on four massy columns with arches. The roof, 51 feet high, is supported by three rows of pillars, terminating in pointed arches; and the nave displays a sort of singularity in being divided into four aisles, which run from the transept to the west end. The choir is spacious, and before the Reformation, was divided into several distinct chapels. There are galleries quite round the church; on the front of that opposite the pulpit are the arms of the town, a golden fleece in a field azure, surrounded by a garter, on which is inscribed Sigillum Burgi de Leedes, supported by two crowned owls, in honour of Sir John Saville. Here are a fine peal of ten bells, with chimes that play at four, six, eight, and twelve o’clock, and an excellent organ built by Henry Price. On the ceiling of the nave, the Ascension is painted in fresco, by Parmentier.

In this church are many sepulchral monuments of the 15th and 16th centuries, now greatly defaced; but the inscriptions are mostly preserved by Thoresby. Among those of a modern date there are several upon young and promising officers that fell during the late revolutionary war. St. John’s was founded and finished by John Harrison, Esq., and consecrated Sept. 1, 1634. This eminent benefactor, who died anno 1656, in the 77th year of his age, is here interred under a tomb of black marble, with an appropriate inscription. Trinity church, erected about 1721, is a handsome stone structure with a tower and spire; the roof is supported by a double row of Corinthian columns. St. Paul’s, another elegant stone edifice erected by the Rev. Miles Atkinson, is neatly finished. St. James’s church is an octagonal building of stone, and was first occupied by the late Lady Huntingdon’s preachers, but was purchased by two clergymen of the established church, and has been since consecrated.

Besides the five churches, here are eight meetinghouses for Protestant Dissenters, viz. one Presbyterian, one Unitarian, three of Independents, one of Scotch Seceders, one for Baptists, one for Quakers, exclusive of two Methodist meetings, and a Roman Catholic chapel.

The General Infirmary is a large and handsome building of brick, built and supported by voluntary subscription. Every person, wherever his residence may be, is admissible, if recommended by a subscriber; but in cases admitting of no delay, this is not necessary. Mr. Howard, who visited this hospital in 1788, says, this hospital is one of the best in the kingdom. In Vicar-lane there is another hospital, called the House of Recovery, for the reception of poor persons having infectious fevers. Its objects are, first, to prevent the spread of contagious fevers, by removing into well-ventilated apartments every poor person on the first appearance of an infectious fever; by which separation the rest of the family and neighbourhood will probably be preserved from its ravages; and generally to effect the recovery of those who might otherwise fall victims to the disease.

To the old almshouses founded and endowed by John Harrison, Esq. for forty poor women, twelve more have been added, according to the will of the late Arthur Aikin, Esq., which now afford a retreat to sixty-four aged persons, each of whom receives the sum of six guineas per annum. The new almshouses, ten in number, forming three sides of a square, were founded by Mrs. Potter, for the widows of deceased tradesmen, each having a salary of ten pounds per annum.

The Free Grammar-School was also erected by the benevolent John Harrison, Esq.; and in 1692, Godfrey Lawson, Esq. added a new apartment. This school has produced several eminent men in church and state. The charity school instructs seventy boys and fifty girls in reading and knitting: this was likewise founded by Mr. Harrison. The workhouse was built by Richard Sykes, Esq. alderman in 1636; but has since been considerably enlarged. At the King’s Mills, held by J. P. Neville, Esq. by a grant from the crown, all the inhabitants of Leeds are obliged to grind their corn, except those whose houses stand on ground formerly belonging to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem.

The water works are near the bridge crossing the Aire; by means of these works the town is abundantly supplied with soft water. Adjoining these are the vast warehouses belonging to the Aire and Galder navigation. Here are also assembly-rooms, consisting of a ballroom, tearoom, and card-room; the dancing assemblies are held every fortnight during the winter. The theatre was built by the late Tate Wilkinson, Esq. Plays are performed here generally three nights in the week, during the summer months; the season commencing about the middle of May. In this town there is also a circulating library, which contains a good collection of books, and some valuable manuscripts; to these it has been in agitation to add an annual exhibition of pictures. The Mixed-Cloth Hall, erected in 1758, at the expense of the manufacturers, is a quadrangular building, inclosing an open area. The structure is 127 yards in length, and 66 in breadth, and is divided into six covered streets, each containing two rows of stands, making in the whole 1800. Each stand is 22 inches in front. About twenty individuals have been in possession of two stands each. All these persons have served a regular apprenticeship to the making of coloured cloth. Each stand cost the original proprietor three guineas each; but they have since been raised from eight to fifteen pounds, according to the situation. The White-Cloth Hall was built in 1775, and is a quadrangle like the other, having five covered streets, each with a double row of stands: The first cost of these was thirty shillings; but they have been sold from three pounds to eight guineas. Manufacturers of an inferior class, who have served a regular apprenticeship, but have no property in the halls, bring their cloth into the inclosed area, and pay a fixed price for every piece exposed to sale. In Albion-street is a small hall, for clothiers who cannot be admitted into the other halls, not having served a regular apprenticeship. The cloth-market at both the halls is held on Tuesdays and Saturdays, and the commencement is announced by ringing a bell, and the whole business of the market must be concluded in an hour and a quarter. Any merchant remaining in the hall after the last bell has done ringing, must pay five shillings every five minutes, or be excluded till the fines are paid. The corn-market is held every Tuesday in Cross-parish. The shambles display great abundance of butchers’ meat; and the fish-markets are held on Monday and Thursday. The quantity of fruit and garden stuff sold every market-day is very great. Besides cloths, here are several manufactures of sacking, canvas, linen, and thread. Here are also carpet manufactories; and a number of cotton-mills, most of which have been worked by steam. Numerous mills cover the banks of the Aire, for grinding corn, dyers’ wood, rapeseed, fulling-cloth, turning machinery, &c.

In 1811 the population of Leeds was 62,534 persons, an increase of nearly ten thousand since the census of 1801. The navigable river Aire, with the Leeds and Liverpool canal, have been the means of increasing the trade of these places by an easy communication with the eastern and western seas. This canal, which commences about a quarter of a mile above the bridge at Leeds, passes by Kirkstall Abbey and Shepley, above which it crosses the river Aire. It then proceeds to Bingley, and passing within a short distance of Keighley, continues its course to Skipton. Near Gargrave, four miles and a half west of Skipton, it again crosses the Aire, and is afterwards continued into Lancashire, through which county it is carried to Liverpool, an extent of 109 miles.

The borough of Leeds, which comprises the whole parish, is governed by a corporation, consisting of a mayor, twelve aldermen, and a common-council of twenty-four members. The mayor and aldermen are justices of the peace; and one or more of them attend every Tuesday and Friday at the Rotation-office, for the dispatch of business. A sessions for the borough is held every three months, at which the mayor presides; and a general sessions for the West Riding is held here at Michaelmas. The Moot-hall, till the year 1811, was the sessions or courthouse, but at that time the magistrates voted three thousand pounds towards the building of a handsome new one, since completed.

To this has been added a prison, very different, in point of convenience, from that which was visited by Mr. Howard. When that gentleman pointed out the insalubrity of this wretched dungeon, on being told that prisoners seldom remained in it more than a month, he observed, "an hour was too long to stay in such a place The recent establishment of a Vagrant-office in Leeds has already been attended with the most beneficial consequences. Street beggars are already considerably diminished; and the lodging-houses, which used each to harbour twenty or thirty vagrants daily, are quite clear of visitors, and are likely to be closed.

In March 1818, the first stone of Wellington-bridge was laid here; it consists of one handsome arch; the architect was J. Rennie, Esq.

With respect to the cloth-market at Leeds, finished goods on the ground story are offered for sale from half past eight till ten minutes before ten o’clock, down to the quantity of half a piece, and at ten the market up one pair of stairs for white, or undyed goods, commences. In this town butchers’ meat of good quality, together with roots and vegetables, as well as fruit, are exposed in great abundance for sale. Dyed yarns, and even cartloads of the plant woad, are also exposed in the market for sale. New buildings even in the latter end of the summer of 1819, were erecting, and excited the appearance of a town in a thriving state. The manufactories are now extended to the whole process of carding, spinning, weaving, shearing, and pressing, all by steam.

The pleasant village of Knostrop is upon the banks of the Aire; and the environs of Leeds, in general, are pleasant.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

LEEDS, the chief seat of the woollen manufacture, and the most populous town in the county, is a municipal and parliamentary borough, township and parish, the head of a union and a pulling place for the Eastern division of the Riding, in the wapentake of Skyrack and liberty of the honor of Pontefract, diocese of Ripon, archdeaconry of Craven and rural deanery of Leeds; distant from London by the Great Northern railway 185 miles, by the Midland 196, London and North Western 226, from Birmingham, by rail, 113 ½, Bath 201, Bradford 8 ¾, Bristol 208, Chester 89 ½, Cheltenham 166, Chesterfield 49 ¾, Cardiff 201, Carlisle 110, Doncaster 29 ¾, Dewsbury 9, Dudley 106, Derby 74, Edinburgh 225, Exeter 276 ½, Glasgow 238, Gloucester 170 ½, Great Grimsby 56, Holyhead 160, Hull 55 ½, Hereford 149, Halifax 17, Huntingdon 126 ½, Huddersfield 17, Kidderminster 119, Keighley 17 ¼, Liverpool 74, Lancaster 65 ¼, Leicester 103, Loughborough 91, Manchester 42 ½, Macclesfield 55, Newark 66, Newcastle-on-Tyne 100, Normanton 10 ¾, Nottingham 77, Otley 12, Oxford 168, Peterborough 109 ½, Preston 60, Plymouth 329, Retford (East) 47, Rugby 23, Saddleworth 28 ¾, Stockport 42 ¼, Stafford 93 ¼, Skipton, 26 ¼, Sheffield 39, Shrewsbury 98 ½, Swansea 201 ½, Wakefield 9, Warrington 59, Wolverhampton 106, Worcester 142 ¼, York 31. The river Aire, which rises in the hills near Malham to the north-west, flows through Skipton and Bingley to Leeds, where it becomes navigable, and thence joins the Ouse; in passing through the town it is connected with the Leeds and Liverpool canal, thus affording a direct communication by water across the country from the port of Hull to Liverpool. Lines of rail radiate from Leeds towards every important place in the kingdom; the railway stations being commodious and situated in convenient and central localities.

Numerous traces of the Saxon occupation have been found in and about Leeds; and it is supposed that this was also the site of a Roman town, considerable remains of Roman tiles and bricks having been discovered. Dr. Whitaker expresses little doubt that the Roman road from Calcaria to Carnbodunum ran through Leeds, in the present line of Briggate, and that there was a trajectus on the site of the old bridge; and there is also strong presumptive evidence of the existence, at a very early period, of a Norman castle on the site of Mill hill. Bede, who wrote more than a thousand years ago, mentions Leeds.

The Bridges of Leeds have all been freed from toll by the Corporation: they are Leeds Bridge, at the foot of Briggate; Wellington Bridge, at Wellington road; the suspension Bridge, at south Accommodation road, Hunslet; Victoria Bridge, at the foot of Neville street or school close; Crown Point Bridge, at the foot of East street; and Monk Bridge, Whitehall road.

A road, 40 feet wide throughout, is in course of construction by the Corporation to connect Leeds with Armley: starting from the Kirkstall road, it crosses the river Aire by means of a substantial brick bridge, and the Leeds and Liverpool canal will he spanned by an iron bridge; the new road terminating at Canal road, Armley: the estimated cost of the bridges, exclusive of approaches, is upwards of £9,000.

The borough of Leeds was incorporated by Charles I. in 1626; a second charter being granted by Charles 11, in 1661; and a third by James II. in 1684; it was not created a parliamentary borough until the passing of the Reform Act in 1832, though during the civil wars of Charles I. it was represented by Adam Baynes, of Knostrop: under “The Representation of the People Act, 1867,” it returns three members, subject to the provision that no person shall vote for more than two candidates. The parliamentary and municipal boroughs are co-extensive, and are at present (1881) divided into twelve wards, shortly to be increased to sixteen; the town council consisting of a mayor, sixteen aldermen and forty-eight councillors. The assizes for the West Riding are held in the Town Hall.

There is an estate with houses producing about £2,000 yearly for the improvement of highways.

The production of woollen goods has been the chief business here for centuries, as is evidenced by an extract from Lord Clarendon’s History, written in 1642, wherein, speaking of Leeds, Bradford and Halifax, he calls them “three very populous and rich towns, depending wholly on clothiers.” The cloth manufacture here embraces every description of that material, so that the buyer can obtain at one mart all kinds of black and blue superfine cloths, scotch camlets, coarse narrow cloths, ladies’ cloths, Shawls and blankets. West of England cloths are no longer considered superior to the best of those produced in this neighbourhood, as was formerly the case; first-class Yorkshire cloths being now considered inferior to none.

The Mixed or Colored Cloth Hall, in Park row, erected in 1758, is a quadrangular building enclosing an open area, and is 382 feet long and 198 feet broad. The New White Cloth Hall, situated in King street, is an edifice of brick with stone dressings, in the Italian style, erected in 1868 at a cost of £20,000, by the North Eastern Railway Company, in lieu of the old Cloth Hall near the Corn Exchange: the building is a rectangle, 302 feet long and 177 feet wide, with a large open central area and a frontage two stories in height; the interior is arranged in rows called ‘ streets, ' numbered alphabetically from A to H, each letter constituting a ‘street, ’ and containing in all 1,238 stands for the sale of cloth: the hall is open every Tuesday and Saturday, from 10.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.; the cloth brought here for sale being chiefly unfinished, and having afterwards to undergo the process of dressing and finishing before it passes into the hands of retail dealers.

There are extensive flax mills; linen, thread, worsted, stuff, canvas, carpet, sacking, rope and boot and shoe manufactories; glass and earthenware works, iron foundries, breweries, tanneries, dye works, machine and railway and other engine works and steam saw mills, besides numerous mills for grinding corn, seed and dye woods. Tobacco also is manufactured to a considerable extent.

The parish church of St. Peter, situated in Kirkgate, is a handsome building in the Later Decorated and Early Perpendicular styles, with tower 139 feet high, containing a peal of thirteen bells, weighing 8 tons 3 cwt.: it was erected in 1839—40, at a cost of £30,000, on the site of an older church, and is 180 feet long and 86 feet wide, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, transepts and ante chapels; there are many stained windows, and a painting over the communion table representing the “Agony in the Garden:” this church contains a stone slab inscribed to the memory of Ralph Thoresby, antiquary and historian of Leeds, of ob. 1726, a monumentby Flaxman at the end of the north aisle to Captains Walker and Beckett, who fell at Talavera, and a memorial in the form of a cenotaph to the late Dr. Hook, Dean of Chichester, and formerly vicar of Leeds, consisting of an altar tomb of red marble, designed by the late Sir Gilbert Scott, R.A. bearing a recumbent figure of the Dean in white marble, by Mr. Kegworth. and was executed and placed in the church at a cost of about £1,000: a noble cross, probably of the 10th century, about 14 feel high, covered on all sides with carvings of heads and interlaced work, has been replaced on the steps leading to the communion table close to its original position. The date of the old church is unknown, but Thoresby, in his history of Leeds, 1715, gives the following description:-“The parish church, which was dedicated to St. Peter, is a very spacious and strong fabric, an emblem of the church militant, black but comely, being of great antiquity; it doth not pretend to the mode of reformed architecture, but it is strong and useful. That there was a church here during the Saxon heptarchy, when the kings of Northumberland had their palace here, is more than probable, but it is indisputable that in William the Conqueror’s time there was, and some parts of the present church may be of that antiquity.” The register dates from the year 1572, and is in good condition. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £1,300, in the gift of trustees and held by the Rev. John Gott D.D. of Brasenose College, Oxford, rural dean and surrogate.

Holy Trinity church, Boar lane, built in 1727, Is a stone edifice, in the Roman Doric order, Consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, with an arched entrance surmounted by a pediment, and a tower of more recent date, the original tower having been severely injured in a storm; the interior has a massive oak roof, supported by columns with composite capitals, and a richly ornamented chancel, lighted by a large stained window; and there are other stained windows. The register dates from the year 1730. The living is a freehold incumbency, but without cure of souls; yearly value £500 with residence, in the gift of the vicar and the Recorder of Leeds and the vicar of St. Johns, and held by the Rev. James Henry McCheane M.A. late scholar of Lincoln College, Oxford.

The other churches in the town have districts attached taken out of the mother parish of St. Peter.

All saints parish was formed in 1847; the church, in York road, built in 1850, is a stone building in the Geometrical Gothic style, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, with square tower, surmounted by a lofty spire and containing 1 bell; the sittings are all free. The register dates from the year 1851. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300 with handsome residence, in the alternate patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev, George Frederick Gibbs of St. Aidars, surrogate. The area is 1,280 acres; the population in 1871 was 9,283.

All souls, Blackman lane, was erected as a memorial to the late Dean Hook, vicar of Leeds, 1837—1859, the foundation stone being laid in September, 1876, and the church consecrated on 29th January 1880; it is a noble edifice of stone in the Gothic style of the 13th century, and consists, at present, of chancel, nave with aisles and clerestory-the tower, to be placed at the west end, not having been as yet erected: the internal length is 134 feet, the width of nave and chancel 23 feet, and of aisles 11 feet; the nave is divided from the aisles by moulded arches, and is covered in a with a barrel-shaped roof of pitch pine, strengthened by moulded transverse ribs; the chancel is groined and ribbed in stone; the nave, seated with chairs, is available for about 900 worshippers, all the seats being free: the internal fittings are chiefly special mamorial gifts from members of the late Dean’s family, clergy associated with him in past years, and the congregation of the new church: this church, designed by the late Sir Gilbert Scott, has cost, including interior work, nearly £20,000: the ecclesiastical district to be assigned to All souls will be formed from the parishes of St. Mark, St. Matthew and St. Michael, and will contain a population of 4,000 people. The register dates from the opening of the church. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200, in the gift of the Vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev. Cecil Hook B.A. of Christ Church College, Oxford.

Christ Church parish was formed in 1861) the church, in Meadow lane, was erected by Government in 1828, with part of what is known as the “One Million Grant,” and is a Gothic building, of Bramley Fall stone, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, with a massive tower rising to the height of 127 feet, and containing 1 bell and a clock: the chancel is enclosed by iron rails of ecclesiastical design, the gift of the present vicar and Mr. Brown of Briggate; the altar piece was presented by the late George Banks; the windows in the nave are stained, one being a memorial to the Rev. H. E. Phillips B.A. late incumbent; another having been placed by the present vicar to the memory of his parents: the handsome altar books and the carved oak credence table were purchased with the alms contributed by the poor widows who attended the communicant class during the incumbency of the Rev. W, C. Barwis; the font is the gift of Messrs. Thomas and Henry Harrison, and was erected to the memory of their mother: the clock was placed in the tower in 1832, at a cost of £298 6s. 3d. raised by subscription: this church has sittings for about 1,000 persons. The register dates from the year 1827. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £260 with residence, in the gilt of the vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev. John Greenwood smith M.A. of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford. The area is 130 acres; the population in 1871 was 6,594.

The district of St. Albans was formed from the parish of St. Stephen, in the year 1876: the church in Saville Green, and erected in 1876 at a cost of £4,800, is a cruciform structure of brick in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, and has 1 bell. The register dates from the year 1877. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200, in the gift of the Bishop and held by the Rev, James Whalley, of St. Bees.

St. Andrew’s is an ecclesiastical parish formed in 1844; the church, in Cavendish street, is a stone building in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, and was erected by subscription in 1845, as a monument to Mrs. Sinclair, wife of the Rev. W. Sinclair, late incumbent of St. George’s; there are 850 sittings. The register dates from the year 1845. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £340 with residence, in the gift of five trustees and held by the Rev. Benjamin Mills M.A. of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. The population in 1871 was 6,061.

The church of St. Edmund, in Providence street, Richmond hill, is a stone building in the Early English style, erected in 1876 at a cost of £3,500, and consists of chancel, nave and north aisle, with a stained east window; there are sittings for 424 persons. The register dates from the year 1876. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. William John Margetts.

St. George’s is an ecclesiastical parish formed in 1838; the church in Great George street, is a stone building in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and tower with spire and clock: the west entrance is approached by a lofty flight of stone steps and surrounded by a flagged terrace. The register dates from 1838. The living is a vicarage in the patronage of five trustees, having a small endowment supplemented by pew rents, and is of the yearly value of about £500 with residence, and is held by the Rev. Charles Edward Lamb M.A. of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. The population in 1871 was 11,908.

Emmanuel church, Woodhouse lane, attached to the parish of St. George, was consecrated September 15th. 1880, and is a building of stone in the Early English style, consisting as far as yet erected of chancel, nave with north and south aisles, clerestory, central tower and north -west porch, although when complete the church will have in addition north and south transepts and aspire: the church, is seated with open benches of pitch pine, those for the choir being of oak and much more elaborate: the cost of the church up to the present time has been £9,000. The register dates from the opening of the church. The living is in the gift of five trustees and has a yearly income of £150, entirely derived from pew rents, and Is held by the Rev. Charles Llewelyn Ivens M.A. of Christ Church, Oxford.

St. James’s proprietary church, York street, is an octagon: building of stone, originally erected for a chapel in connection with Lady Huntingdon’s society, but was purchased by the Rev. John King M.A. and consecrated under a special Act of Parliament by the Archbishop of York, about the beginning of the present century; the interior has been altered so as to assume a somewhat ecclesiastical character, and it now consists of chancel, nave and aisles, and will seat about 1,000 persons, the galleries being devoted to the use of the Sunday schools. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the vicar of Leeds, yearly value £150, and held by the Rev. Edward Jackson LL.B, of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, M.A. Cantuar, and hon. canon of Ripon, appointed in 1846.

The parish of St. John the Baptist, New town, was formed in 1868; the church in Robson street, is a stone building in the Decorated style, erected in 1867 by the Leeds Church Extension society, consisting of chancel, nave, and apse, with turret and has 600 sittings, all free and unappropriated, the expenses being paid out of the weekly offertory: there are six stained windows in the nave and one in the chancel. The register dates from the year 1867. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £215, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Samuel Stretford Sambrick B.A. of Trinity College, Dublin. The population in 1871 was 5,725.

The parish of St. John the Evangelist was formed in 1845; the church in New Briggate, is a stone building of the early part of the seventeenth century, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles with a square embattled tower containing 4 bells: an ancient carved oak screen separates the nave from the chancel: the church has been thoroughly repaired and restored, the ancient and richly scrolled panels of the roof being retained, and an organ chamber added. The register dates from the year 1773. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £550, in the gift of the vicar, mayor and three aldermen of Leeds, and held by the Rev. Henry Temple M.A. of Brasenose College, Oxford, hon. canon of Ripon, proctor for the archdeaconry of Craven, and surrogate.

St. John’s church estate of houses produces with invested funds, about £2,000 a year, the residue of which, after payment of the stipends of vicar and curate and the expenses of repairs &c. is applied in grants to augment the income of poor incumbents; about £900 was so applied in 1879. The population in 1871 was 5,082.

St. Mary’s parish was formed in 1862; the church, in, Quarry hill, built in 1827, is a large stone building, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, with square tower at the west end containing 1 bell: there are about 1,200 sittings. The church was restored in 1880 at a cost of £250. The register dates from the year 1828. The living is a vicarage, yearly value about £300 with residence, in the gift of the vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev. William Studdert Kennedy M.A. of Trinity College, Dublin. The population in 1871 was 7,880.

St. Paul’s ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1866; the church, which is in Park square, is a stone building in the Grecian style, built in 1793, consisting of nave, galleries and a tower. The register dates from the year 1796. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300 with residence, in the gift of the vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev. John Remington Stratten T.A.K.C.L. The area is 96 acres; the population in 1871 was 4,267.

St. Philip’s parish was formed in 1845; the church, in Wellington street, was built in 1847, and is a building in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and a tower with spire containing 3 bells and a clock. The register dates from the year 1848. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200 with residence, in the alternate patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Thomas Gleave, of the London College of Divinity. The population in 1871 was 3,258.

St. Saviour’s parish was formed in 1845; the church, on Cavalier hill, East street, is a handsome Gothic cruciform building of stone, erected in 1843—5, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles and transepts and a bell turret; a carved screen divides the chancel from the nave; memorial windows have been placed in the church to William Lyndon smith esq. (late honorary organist), who was drowned in attempting to save the life of Miss Butler, in Gledhow pond, January 23, 1865; and to Miss Outhwaite; Bishop Forbes (formerly vicar); the Rev, T. and Mrs. Collins and the Rev. R. Collins, late vicar. The register dates from the year 1845. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £285 with residence, in the patronage of trustees and held by the Rev. John Wylde M.A. of Magdalen College, Oxford. The area is 1,025 acres; the population in 1871 was 8,572.

St. Simon’s parish was formed in 1869; the church, in Ventnor street, is, a plain Gothic stone building, and was erected at the sole expense of the Beckett family, who also built the National schools connected with this church. The register dates from the year 1865. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200 with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Samuel Augustus Edward Elworthy Brooking B.A. of St. John’s College, Cambridge. The area is 45 acres; the population in 1871 was 3,715.

All Hallows church is a temporary wooden structure, situate in Alexandra grove; a conventional district assigned to this church was formed in 1876 out of the parishes of St. George’s, Leeds and St. Matthias’, Burley; the living, yearly value £200, in the gift; of the vicar of Burley, is held by the Rev. Arthur William Septimus Albert Row B.A. of St. John’s College, Cambridge, designate.

The temporary church of St. Agnes, in Shakespeare street, Burmantofts, is now (1881) in course of erection by the Church Extension society for a new district to be formed from the parish of St. Stephen. The Rev. Thomas Johnstone Hamerton, of Queen’s College, Belfast, is incumbent designate.

The church of St. Hilda, in Cross Green lane, the building of which has been delayed for the last three years for the want of funds, is now (1881) in course of erection, and will consist of chancel with a nave of four bays; there will be no chancel arch, the division between the nave and chancel being effected by a lofty screen surmounted by an organ gallery: at the east end of the north aisle is a sacristy; the probable cost of the building when ready for consecration will be about £8,000; the district assigned to this church will be formed from the parish of St. Saviour. The Rev. Edgcumbe Staley B.A. of Christ’s College, Cambridge, is curate in charge of the present temporary church and district.

A district Mission church is being erected in Nether green, in connection with All Souls: services are in the meantime held in a temporary wooden building.

St. Stephen’s parish, Burmantofts, was formed in 1851; the church, in Accommodation road, built in 1854, is a small stone building in the Geometrical style, consisting of chancel, nave and octagon tower with spire. The register dates from the year 1854. The living is a Vicarage, yearly value £300 with residence, in the gift of five trustees and held by the Rev. Charles Augustus Hulbert, jun. M.A. of Caius College, Cambridge. The population in 1871 was 9,294.

The parish of St. Michael, Buslingthorpe, was formed in 1849; the church, in Buslingthorpe lane, is a stone building in the Mixed style, consisting of chancel, nave and transept, and has sittings for about 600. The register dates from the year 1847. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £320 with residence, in the gift of five trustees and held by the Rev. Edgar Henry Rand M.A. of Trinity College, Dublin. The population in 1871 was 5,294.

The parish of St. Thomas, Leylands, was formed in 1865; the church, in Melbourne street, was built in the year 1852, at a cost of £7,000, and is a building of brick faced with stone, in the Decorated style, consisting of nave and aisles; a large and valuable painting of Our Saviour and St. Thomas, presented by Miss C. Kemplay, of St. John’s, has been placed in the church. The register dates from the year 1852. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £230, in the gift of the vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev. William Dunn M.A. of Clare College, Cambridge. The area is 35 acres; the population in 1871 was 6,017.

St. Matthew’s parish, Little London, was formed in 1846; the church, in Camp road, is a stone building in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave, transepts, aisles and two chapels, and has a tower with spire and 2 bells; there are 1,085 sittings, all free. The register dates from the year 1851. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £236 with residence, in the alternate patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Ernest Graham Ingham M.A. of St. Mary Hall, Oxford. The population in 1871 was 7,268.

St. Clement’s parish, Shebpscar, was formed in 1866; the church, in Chapeltown road, consecrated in 1868, is a handsome edifice in the Early English style, built of Potternewton stone with Weetwood stone dressings, at a cost of about £10,000, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, north and south porches and a fine square tower, with octagonal turrets, rising to an altitude of 140 feet, the bell chamber being remarkable for the absence of louvre boards: the church is well lighted by double rows of clerestory windows, in addition to those in the lower part of the building; in the arches dividing the nave and aisles a very effective blending of soft Suffolk brick and stone work is introduced, the supporting pillars being of Dumfries red sandstone, with foliated capitals: the chancel, apsidal in form, contains seven two-light windows, all of which are stained, as is the west window, beneath which the wall is decorated with elaborate designs in encaustic tiles; the corbels of the chancel roof are adorned with emblematic carvings, and in its arcades, as also in other parts of the church, are gracefully carved imitations of fern and other leaves the Moor is laid with encaustic tiles: the organ, built at a cost of 1,600 guineas, is considered to be one of the finest in the neighbourhood: the circular stone pulpit is enriched by four exquisitely carved panels, and the font is very massive and chaste. The register dates from the year 1868. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £218 with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Thomas Samuel Fleming F.R.G.S. The area in 197 acres; the population in 1871 was 6,289.

St. Luke’s parish, Sheepscar, was formed in 1861; the church, in North street, erected in 1841, is a small plain stone building, consisting of chancel and nave only, with two bell turrets; the east window and four others in the nave are stained, one of these being a memorial to the Rev. Charlea H. Collier, late incumbent, and another to various benefactors. The register dates from the year 1841. The living is a Vicarage, yearly value £300 with residence, in the gift of the vicar of Leeds and held by the Rev, Charles Harley Drummond Williams M.A, of Trinity College, Dublin. The population in 1871 was 4,856.

The parish of St. Mark, Woodhouse, was formed in 1831; the church, in St. Mark’s road, is a stone building in the Early English style, consecrated January 13th. 1826, consisting of nave, aisles and tower, and has sittings for about 1,100. The register dates from the year 1827. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £366 with residence, in the gift of the trustees of Leeds vicarage and held by the Rev. James swift Abbott, of Queen’s College, Birmingham, The population in 1871 was 6,908.

St. Augustine’s parish, Wrangthorn, was formed in 1866; the church at Hyde Park corner is of stone, in the Decorative Gothic style of the early fourteenth century, and consists of chancel, transepts, nave with aisles and a tower and spire, recently erected; the nave has six bays carrying a clerestory with ten windows on either side, supported by circular columns of polished red granite, the responds are clusters of red and grey granite, and the chancel arch is supported by small shafts of serpentine marble on corbels: there are oak stalls for the choir; the pulpit is of Caen stone, elaborately carved and enriched with marbles of various colours; the font is also of Caen stone and coloured marbles and was presented by the architect, James Barlow Fraser esq. of Leeds: the organ, which cost £780, consists of three manuals, has 29 stops and is blown by hydraulic power: there are 655 sittings, all of which are free. The register dates from the year 1870. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £150, endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, in the gift of the Queen and Bishop alternately and held by the Rev. James Boultbee A.K.C.L. The population in 1871 was 2,224.

St. Ann’s Catholic cathedral, Park row, erected in 1838, is a handsome structure of stone in the Perpendicular style, with a lofty spire: it has some good carved stall work and stained windows.

St. Patrick’s Catholic church, York road, is a building in the Pointed style, built in 1832, at a cost of about £2,000.

St. Joseph’s Catholic church, at Hunslet, erected in 1860, is a building of brick, in the Gothic style, consisting of chancel and two chapels, and contains about 560 sittings.

Mount St. Mary’s Catholic church, in Church street, Richmond hill, built in 1866 at a cost of £20,000, is a handsome Gothic building, consisting of a spacious chancel and sanctuary, nave, aisles, transepts and six chapels: the stained windows are very fine.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Diocesan seminary, adjoining the Bishop’s residence and within the grounds of Springfield House, is an imposing and massive pile of brickwork with stone dressings: the main building contains spacious lecture rooms, professors’ apartments and rooms for 30 students; at right angles to which is a wing containing, in the basement, the kitchen and offices; on the ground floor, the refectory; and above it a chapel: the Library, a spacious and lofty room, lighted by large traceried windows with a gallery running round the interior, connects the main building with the Bishop’s residence, and will serve both for the students and for the clergy of the town and neighbourhood: the building has been erected at a cost of about £12,000 from the designs of Mr. Goldie, of Kensington.

St. Bridget's Catholic chapel, Regent street, was formerly known as Ann Carr’s chapel.

The Congregationalists, Wesleyans, Baptists, Unitarians, Presbyterians and the society of Friends have each places of worship here. Here are also chapels for the Primitive Methodists, Methodist New Connexion, United Methodist Free Church, Catholic Apostolic Church and Latter Day saints.

Mill Hill Unitarian chapel, Park row, opened in 1848, at a cose of about £9,000, is a building in the Gothic Rectilinear style: the interior is elaborately fitted and contains memorial windows to the Rev. J. Hutton LL.D, and Mr. and Mrs. A. Lupton. The minister’s house was taken down in 1857 and buildings erected on the site containing a spacious ball and schools.

The Primitive Methodist chapel, Bellevue road, occupying a commanding position at the junction of Bellevue road and Woodsley road, is built of red pressed bricks and stone dressings; the principal front being of the Corinthian order, surmounted by a pediment.

Brunswick Wesleyan chapel is a stone structure in the Grecian style, built in, 1825, at a coat of £11,000: the Interior will seat 2,500 persons; attached to this chapel are mission rooms and Sunday schools for 800 scholars.

The Leeds Cemetery contains about 16 ½ acres, and is divided into two equal portions for members of the Church of England and Dissenters, each division having a mortuary chapel and lodge. The general management Is vested in the Leeds Town Council.

The Leeds General Cemetery, near Woodhouse, was opened by a company of shareholders, with a capital of £10,000, in 1835, and has an area of ten acres.

The Yorkshire College was founded in 1874 to supply instruction in science and arts applicable to the productive industry of the county of York. The subjects of study include mathematics and physics, chemistry, geology, mining, biology, civil and mechanical engineering, Classical literature and history, mental and moral science, modern literature and history, French, German and Oriental languages: special endowments are provided by the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers of London for instruction in the processes of textile manufacture and dyeing, and by the Drapers’ Company in coal mining. Most of the classes are still held in the temporary premises in Cookridge street, but permanent buildings have been commenced on the Beech Grove Hall estate, a site purchased at a cost of £13,000 and situated at a convenient distance from railway stations and public institutions. The Clothworkers’ Company have erected buildings at a cost of £15,000 for the exclusive use of the department endowed by them, and these include lecture hall, pattern loom room, large weaving shed and well appointed dye house. The subscriptions to endowment and building funds amount to upwards of £60,000. The number of day students in the sixth session was 342; there are also evening lectures delivered by the professors in Leeds and other towns of the West Riding. The president of the college is Lord F. C. Cavendish M.P.; treasurer, W, B. Denison esq.; chairman of council, Sir Edmund Baines; hon. Secretary, R. Reynolds esq. F.C.S.

Carr’s Charity, of £120 yearly, is expended in apprenticing.

Leeds Clergy school, Clarendon house, Clarendon road, was founded in 1876, with the sanction of the Lord Bishop of the diocese, by the Rev. John Gott D.D. vicar of Leeds, for the preparation of graduates for ordination to town curacies. There are four exhibitions of £80 a year, all exhibitioners being supposed to remain a complete year at the school and to take their first curacy in a town parish: candidates for these exhibitions must satisfy the principal and tutors that they are deserving persons, and in need of such assistance.

The Town Hall is a stone building of palatial character, in the Classic style, situated on the north side of Park Iane, forming a rectangle 250 feet long by 200 feet in breadth and about 67 feet in height, standing on an elevated platform and surrounded by Corinthian columns and pilasters, supporting an entablature and balustrade: the south or principal facade has a deeply recessed portico of 12 columns, 10 in front with two responds, and is approached by a noble flight of steps 110 feet in length, at each end of which are two colossal figures of lions carved in stone, by W. D. Keyworth. jun. of London and Hull, and erected in 1867, at a cost of £600; in the centre of this facade, and adjoining the south end of the large hall, rises the tower, 225 feet in height, containing a great bell weighing upwards of four tons, cast and hung at a cost of £662 12s.: the principal entrance is under the south portico, and consists of an archway 32 feet high and 21 feet wide, the lower part of which contains three doors of rich design in wrought and cast iron work glazed; the tympanum of the arch exhibits an emblematic group of figures, the panels displaying some elaborately carved work, executed by the late Mr. Thomas, the sculptor of the Houses of Parliament: the grand entrance, separated from the large hall by a glass screen, opens Into a vestibule of good proportions, on the right-hand side of which is a colossal statue in white marble of Queen Victoria, by Noble, presented to the Corporation by the late Sir Peter Fairbairn, at a cost of 1,000 guineas; and on the other side a similar statue of his late Royal Highness the Prince Consort, by the same sculptor, erected by public subscription; the great hall, rising from the centre of the building to a height of 75 feet, is entered from the vestibule, and, whether regarded in relation to its size, the harmony of its proportions, or its exquisite ornamentations, is one of the noblest public rooms in the country, and is 161 feet long by 72 feet wide; at its north end is an organ, which cost £6,000; on the east side a statue of the late Edward Baines esq. M.P. and on the west side a statue of the late Robert Hall esq. M.P.; the police department and lock-up cells are in the basement; on the ground-floor are the crown, civil and borough courts; council room and committee rooms; town clerk’s, rate and superintendents’ offices; judges’ magistrates’, barristers and waiting rooms; law library &c. on the upper floor are the mayor’s rooms, West Riding magistrates’ court and grand jury room, borough treasurer’s and engineer’s offices: the walls of the council chamber are adorned with life-size portraits of several of the mayors of Leeds, including Sir George Goodman, first mayor of Leeds under the Municipal Act of 1835, and Alderman Hepper, who was mainly instrumental in the erection of the building: the foundation stone was laid August 1853 by the then mayor, John Hopeshaw esq. J.P. and the hall was opened September 7th. 1858, by Her Majesty the Queen: Cuthbert Brodrick esq. of Leeds was the architect: the total cost, including site and fittings, was about £130,000, raised on the rates, which sum has now nearly been paid off.

In front of the Town Hall is a tine bronze statue of the late Duke of Wellington, erected in 1858, at a cost of about £2,000, raised by subscription: the statue is 8 feet 9 inches high, and is placed on a square polished pedestal of scotch granite, with a double step plinth of the same material, together about 12 feet high. Here is also a great fountain, elaborately wrought in iron and stone, consisting of three superimposed basins, the lowermost of which, constructed of stone, has a diameter of 40 feet, its circumference being; relieved by four drinking fountains, placed at equal intervals and bearing vases containing foliage: out of this arises a central basin, 12 feet in diameter, supported by dolphins, surmounted in its turn by a group of nude children, who hear aloft a third basin, terminating upwards in a classic urn: the whole structure reaches an altitude of 34 feet.

The Royal Exchange is a handsome structure in the Perpendicular Gothic style, with frontages in Boar lane, Park row and Basinghall street, and was erected at a cost of £18,000, from the designs of Messrs. T. H. and F„ Healey, of Bradford, the first stone being laid in September, 1872, by H.R.H. Prince Arthur: the tower, surmounted by a spire, rises to a height of 118 feet, and contains a handsome clock, above which is a moulded cornice with shields and a pierced parapet with crocketed pinnacles: the principal entrance to the building is through a porch formed by three arches with polished granite columns, approached by two flights of steps and surmounted by an oriel window: the Exchange itself is a circular apartment in the centre of the block, with a diameter of 60 feet, the area being slightly increased by a large semicircular bay; an arcade of 12 brick and stone arches, supported by pillars with carved capitals and corbels, surrounds the room; from these corbels spring ornamental iron trusses for the support of the roof, 56 feet from the floor, divided into hexagonal panels, and covered in with green Coniston slate: over the arches runs a panelled course of brick and stone, the walls to a certain height being of wrought ashlar stone: the Exchange is lighted by a large glass dome in the roof and by windows, the floor being of oak and pitch-pine in ornamental designs: adjoining this building and on the same level is the news room, which may if necessary be at any time thrown into it; there are rooms above appropriated to the Royal Exchange Club.

The Corn Exchange, in Call lane, is a building of externally dressed stone, and cased internally with coloured bricks, having two porticoed entrances, one facing Duncan street and another in Kirkgate; the ground-plan is an oval, giving a total area of 2,055 square yards, with a length of 190 feet, 136 feet wide and 86 feet high from the basement floor, the factors’ market having an area of 960 and the farmers’ of 400 square yards: the building is covered with an iron roof having an elliptical dome, rising 75 feet from the market floor, and cost together with the land £25,000: there are fifty-six sets of offices, besides a post office, telegraph office, news rooms and subsidiary offices: Mr. Cuthbert Brodrick, of Leeds, was the architect.

The stock Exchange, together with the offices of the Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance Company and of the “Leeds Mercury, ’’ are in Albion street.

The Municipal Offices are being erected for the purpose of concentrating the various departments necessary for the proper administration of the borough: the basement will contain waiting room for the sanitary department, lamp stores, offices for smoke and cab inspectors, house for porter, heating chamber &c.; the ground floor will contain offices for the reception of the borough rates, subdivided according to the particular description of each rate; the first floor will be occupied by the borough engineer’s offices and those of the sanitary department: the whole of the Southern side, except the basement, will be occupied by the free library, comprising a general reading room, 80 feet by 40, and a reading room for females, the lending library being on the first floor, and on the second floor the reference library: space will be provided at the top of the building for exhibitions of pictures or the purposes of a museum. Externally the style adopted is akin to that known as the Palladian but freely treated: above the rusticated basement the facade is divided into two stages of the Corinthian order, and has a lofty attic surmounted by a balustrade: the pillar Sat. the entrance are entire and coupled in the thickness of the wall, the others being three-quarter columns and pilasters, between which are placed round-headed and deeply sunk windows: the entrance hall from Calverley street has two rows of marble columns supporting a deeply coffered waggon vault: the general reading room has on each side an arcade of semicircular arches in stone on granite pillars, the ceiling being formed of segmental vaults of terra-cotta of various colours and patterns carried on wrought iron beams, the haunches being used for flues to extract the foul air from the room: the architect is Mr. George Corson, of Leeds.

The school Board offices in Calverley street adjoin the Municipal offices, and are similar in style, but less lofty: the front displays a rusticated basement, and one storey of the Corinthian order, with a lofty attic and balustrade and a high pitched roof: the ground floor contains the board and committee rooms, chief clerk’s office and other offices for clerks and attendance officers: the upper floor is appropriated to a large examination room, with separate stairs for boys and girls and to the architect’s offices; the basement is used for storing stationery, books, desks &c.: the total cost of the building has been about £20,000, to which must be added £6,500 for cost of site: architect to the Board, Mr. George Corson. There are 46 schools under the control of the Board, the number of children on the rolls being 29,407, with an average attendance of 20,517; in 43 of the schools the children receive instruction in the laws of health, and in 37 instruction in cookery.

The Leeds Workhouse, situated in Beckett street, a large red-brick building in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1871 at a cost of £32,000, is capable of containing 998 inmates: imbecile wards have since been added for the reception of 86.

The Leeds Union Infirmary is a plain but substantial building of brick, three storeys in height, with a total frontage of over 340 feet, and is arranged on the block system to contain 216 beds, for patients: the administrative department, staircases and lavatories occupy the centre of the structure, with wards on either side, each ward being sub-divided by large sliding doors into three compartments and the day-rooms placed at the far end of each ward: the wards are 14 feet high, and each compartment is heated by a double central stove with descending flues, the beds being arranged in pairs between the windows on each side of the wards: in the rear of the building and on a level with the ground floor are the kitchens, a short corridor on both male and female side connecting them with the staircases of the main building: a large hoist is also provided for the convenience of the upper floors: the architect was Mr. Henry Walker, of East parade, Leeds.

The General Infirmary, in Great George street, is an extensive Gothic building of brick with stone dressings, from designs by Sir George Gilbert Scott R.A., the foundation-stone of which was laid in 1864: the general arrangement is on the “Pavilion” principle, each ward forming a separate and isolated building: the principal or south front stands on elevated ground, and consists of a centre and two wings; a highly-ornate portico spanning the carriage road, above which is the board-room, together with private dormitories: in the basement is the out-patient waiting -room, with offices and rooms pertaining to the medical staff; the large wards, ten in number, occupy two floors, and surround the east, west and north sides of the building; the principal entrance-hall, beautifully ornamented, conducts to a long corridor, paved with encaustic tiles and lighted by a glass roof, resting on varnished deal rafters, supported by brackets of polished marble, the carvings representing medicinal plants: passing beneath a carved archway of good proportions, the grand staircase is approached, leading to the upper corridor and the operating room; this corridor encircles the great central court, which is 150 feet in length and 60 feet in width and is covered in with an elegant iron and glass roof: the chapel, standing on the east side, contains some fine stained windows presented by the late Mayor, Sir A. Fairbairn and Dr. Heaton the total cost of erection and fitting will exceed £100,000, of which; the greater part has been raised by voluntary subscription.

The Metcalfe Smith Memorial Fund enables forty patients to be sent annually, without recommendation, direct from the Infirmary to the, Cookridg Convalescent hospital, one patient being eligible for transmission for every £30 subscribed to the fund.

The old Infirmary for the Eye and Ear, formerly in Park lane, was incorporated with the General Infirmary in January, 1871.

The House of Recovery for fever patients was founded in Vicar lane in 1802, but the situation having been found inconvenient and the accommodation insufficient, a handsome institution was built in 1846 in a pleasant and salubrious locality at Burmantofts, at a cost of about £7,000; the institution being now supported by annual subscriptions and voluntary donations.

The Leeds Public Dispensary, New Briggate, first established in North street, in 1824, is a large building, erected in 1867, at a cost of nearly £7,000. In 1879—80, 27,222 patients were treated at the dispensary, and in the same year 22,048 visits were paid to sick poor at their own homes.

There are in this town various other institutions for the relief of the afflicted and unfortunate, to which belongs the Leeds United Institution for the Blind, Deaf and Dumb, situated in Albion street.

Jenkinson’s Hospital, St. Mark’s road, endowed with £240 yearly, provides tor eight poor women, who each receive £12 a year with gas and water free.

Harrison’s Hospital, 57. RagIan road, with £1,000, has fifty inmates, each receiving £16 per annum.

Potter’s Hospital, St. Columba street, income £340, shelters ten widows, who each receive £20 a year.

Dixon’s Charity, amounting to £191 yearly, derived from house rents, supports three poor widows of beneficed clergy belonging to parishes adjacent to Leeds.

The Poor’s Estate of warehouses and land produces £600, which is distributed yearly. There are also, in addition, charities representing an annual sum of £200, distributed yearly in November by a committee.

Baynes’ Charity consists of the interest of £950 New £4 per Cents, and is divided by the vicar of St. Paul’s amongst ten poor widows.

The Leeds Mechanics’ Institute, in Cookridge street, with which is incorporated the Literary society and school of Art, is a noble building in the Italian style, with a facade to three streets, the south and west being entirely of si one, and the north of brick with stone dressings: the plan of the building is rectangular, and comprises a circular lecture theatre, with a gallery, 73 feet in diameter, seating 1,600 persons, besides library, reading and committee-rooms, secretary’s office, and other apartments: the foundation stone was laid on the 31st August, 1860, and the building erected from designs by Mr. Cuthbert Brodrick, architect, of Leeds, the total expense being about £25,000.

The Masonic Hall in Great George street, erected in 1865, at a cost of about £4,300, is a building in the Gothic style, consisting of a reception room 60 by 30 feet, and 25 feet in height; a banqueting room 51 by 21 feet, and 25 feet high; besides a library and other suitable offices.

Kirkgate Market consists of a series of buildings comprising a covered market for general business, besides wholesale meat, fish and produce markets on an extensive scale; the covered market is a structure of iron erected upon the Bite formerly known as the Vicar’s croft, and in form approaches a parallelogram, the length being about 300 feet, and the width 130 feet: the shops, eighty-one in number, are 12 feet square, and form a double row round the exterior, one half facing into the streets by which they are surrounded, and the others opening inside; in addition to these there are eighty-one stalls in the basement, and forty-five shops and stalls in the galleries: the whole is enclosed by ten pairs of folding gates, and is covered in by three longitudinal roofs.

A fine block of buildings, known as Croft Chambers, was erected in 1871 on the site of the old infirmary, in which are the Central reference and lending departments of the Leeds Public Libraries: the reading-room is 70 feet long, 30 feet wide and 13 feet 6 inches in height, and is open free to the publie daily; the reference library contains about 24,000 volumes, the lending department 22,000; the total number of volumes at branches reaching nearly 60,000.

The Philosophical Hall, in Park row, is a noble and handsome stone edifice in the Italian style, partially erected in 1819, at a cost of £7,000, and enlarged and re-arranged in 1861—2, at an additional outlay of £11,500: it contains an admirably arranged museum; spacious lecture theatre, and an extensive library, containing upwards of 16,000 volumes of rare scientific British and foreign works. The public are admitted to the museum daily at a nominal fee. The Lecture session, to which members and subscribers only are admitted, begins in October and ends in April.

The Yorkshire Fine Art society, established in 1880, occupies exhibition galleries in the Athenæura buildings, a splendid pile in the Italian style, erected on the south side of Park Jane, near the Town hall: this building comprises a basement and four floors, the archway on the east side forming the principal entrance and conducting to a spacious vestibule, hall and stone staircase, 13 feet in width the walls of which are faced with slabs of marble; the first floor was designed for the Athenæum club, which is not yet, however, established; the floor over the club room is intended tor an art gallery, and is used by the Fine Art society for the exhibition of water colour drawings; the next, and uppermost floor, lighted from the roof, being reserved for works in oils.

There are several prosperous societies of a literary and scientific character.

The Wellington Baths, situated in Lisbon street, in a densely populated part of the town, erected and opened May 1869, are of red brick with stone dressings, with interior fittings of pitch pine, stained and varnished: there is a large swimming bath 75 feet long and 30 feet wide, and 40 warm baths, the whole being intended for the use of males only: the total cost was about £6,000: Henry Walker esq. was the architect.

The Grand Theatre, situate in New Briggate, was erected in 1878 at a cost of £23,000. The Theatre Royal is in King Charles’ croft.

Leeds is attached to the 10th Brigade Depot of Northern Military district, head-quarters York.

The West Riding Militia Barracks and Depot, situated in Carlton street, Carlton Hill, were erected in 1865, and contain a spacious drill-ground, with residences for six of the permanent staff sergeants.

The Cavalry Barracks in the Chapeltown road are capable of holding 350 men and horses.

The Local Police Force, with offices in the basement of the Town Hall, consists of one chief, five superintendents, fifteen inspectors, forty-four sergeants and 310 officers.

Her Majesty’s Prison, situate near Armley and the Armley read, on the south side of the river Aire and one mile from Leeds, is a castellated structure of massive masonry, erected in 1847, at an expense of about £43,000, and since considerably enlarged, the total cost being £61,822; it is available for about 650 prisoners: Chas, Aug. Keene esq. governor.

Leeds Horticultural Gardens, a popular place of resort, are very pleasantly situated at Woodhouse, and form the boundary of the Leeds and Headingley townships.

A fine bronze statue of the late Sir Robert Peel was erected in 1852 near the Post Office, at a cost of about £1,200, raised by subscription; the statue, 8 feet 6 inches high, is placed on a pedestal of scotch granite, 11 feet 6 inches high, and is an excellent likeness.

Eight newspapers are published here: the” Leeds Mercury,” established in 1719, issued daily with supplement on Saturday; the “Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer,” established in 1754, published daily with supplement on Saturdays; the “Leeds Times,” established in 1833, issued on Saturday: the “Leeds Daily Express,” established 1857; the “Leeds Daily News,” established 1872; the “Yorkshire Independent,” published on Fridays; the “sporting Chronicle,” published daily; and the”Magnet.”

The annual fairs for horses and homed cattle are held on the 10th and 11th of July and on the 8th and 9th of November. A market for cattle and sheep is held every Wednesday. The general market days are Tuesday and Saturday and corn markets Tuesday and Friday. There are eight fairs for the sale of leather, four of which are held on the third Wednesdays in January, April, July and October and four on the first Wednesdays in March, June, September and December.

The following shows the population of the borough:—

Place18611871
East ward18,95420,644
Kirkgate ward3,0882,271
Mill Hill ward5,3123,902
North ward14,55414,728
North-East ward26,58234,900
North— West ward16,56124,227
South ward7,1546,594
West ward25,36132,481
Armley township6,7349,224
Beeston township2,5472,762
Bramley township8,6909,882
Chapel Allerton township3,0833,847
Farnley township3,0642,964
Headingley— cum-Burley with Kirkstall township9,67413,942
Holbeck township15,82417,163
Potternewton township1,8783,457
Seacroft (part of)10
Hunslet township25,76337,289
Temple Newsam (part of)385
Wortley township12,05818,923
Total of borough and parish206,881259,212

The population now (1881) estimated by Registrar-General at 318,920.

The area of the entire parish is 21,572 acres. Area of the township of Leeds, 2,100 acres; rateable value, £620,545; population, 139,362.

The church of St. Luke, Beeston Hill, in the Malvern road, and consecrated in 1872, stone structure, in the Gothic style of the 13th century, consisting of chancel, clerestoried nave, with organ-chamber in the north aisle, and vestry in the south: the cost was £4,500, of which the Leeds Church Extension Society gave £2,200 and the site, the trustees of the late William Beckett £500, there being also numerous oilier contributors. The register dates from the year 1872. The living is a perpetual curacy, yearly value £200, in the gift of seven trustees and held by the Rev. John Lobley M.A. of Trinity College, Dublin. Holbeck Cemetery comprises about 9 acres and is situated at Beeston Hill. £44, being the yearly interest of invested funds, is given to the poor. Holbeck Mechanics’ Institution, situate in Sweet street west, is a large building, containing library and reading-room, lecture ball and extensive class-rooms for the use of classes in connection with the science and Art Department, south Kensington, London.

St. Mary the Virgin is an ecclesiastical parish formed from Leeds civil parish; the church is a spacious and elegant cruciform stone building, in the Decorated style, erected in 1863 on the site of the old church, built in 1636; it has a fine tower surmounted by a broach spire containing a clock and a peal of 8 bells, and cost about £8,000, chiefly the gift of the Ingham family. The register dates from about 1600. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300 with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Edward Wilson B.A. of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge. The area is 565 acres; the population in 1871 was 12,675.

St. Silas’ parish was formed from that of Hunslet in 1870; the church is a stone building in the Early Decorated style, erected in 1869 at a cost of about £5,000, and consists of chancel, nave and aisles with a good organ. The register dates from the year 1870. The living is a perpetual curacy with residence, yearly value £200, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Rev. Richard Collins M.A. of St. John’s College, Cambridge. The area is 104 acres; the population in 1871 was 5,965.

St. Joseph’s Catholic church is a building of brick and stone, erected in 1830, at a cost of £1,600. The Wesleyans, Methodist New Connexion, Primitive Methodists, Methodist Free Church and Unitarians have chapels here. Hunslet Cemetery, situated at Woodhouse Hill, comprises about 11 acres, enclosed and tastefully laid out and containing two mortuary chapels. Here are literary institutions. Here are woollen and flax mills, glass-works, iron foundries, machine factories, chemical works and potteries. The area is 1,150 acres; rateable value, £118,904; and the population in 1871 was 37,289.

New Wortley, a large and extensive district, and parish, formed in 1851 out of the township of Wortley, is a suburb adjoining Holbeck, near Wellington bridge and the Leeds and Liverpool canal. The church of St. John the Baptist is a building of stone, in the Early English style, consisting of nave, transept, aisles and tower with spire containing 1 bell; it was built in 1853 at a cost of £4,000 raised by subscription and grants. The register dates from the year 1850. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £320 with residence, in the gift of the Crown and Bishop of Ripon alternately and held by the Rev. Stephen Pering Lampen Ph.D. of the University of Rostock, and surrogate. The Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Oxford, own the rectorial tithes. The area is 394 acres; the population in 1871 was 13,646.

St. Mary's is a temporary wooden church, served by a curate.

Holy Trinity church, Canal, street Armley Hall, is a stone building in the Gothic style of the fifteenth century, consisting of chancel, nave, north and south aisles, organ chamber and vestries with a small bell-turret at the western gable: the clerestoried nave is divided into five bays by chamfered arches in the orders, resting on moulded shafts with carved caps and moulded bases; the windows throughout are filled with elaborate tracery; the font is of Caen stone; the pulpit is of carved oak upon a stone base; the benches are of pitch pine throughout and will seat 658 persons; the roofs are open timbered, with wrought and chamfered principals, purlins and plates and moulded collar-beams; the total cost, including site, amounting to £6,000. The register dates from the year 1872. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200, in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon and held by the Key. Joseph Maughan T.A. of Kings College, London.

Woodhouse adjoins Leeds and may be considered a portion of it.

MILITARY

Attached to 10th Brigade depot, Northern military district; head quarters, York.

Cavalry Barracks, Chapeltown road.

West Riding Yorkshire (1st) Artillery Volunteers, head quarters, Fenton street; Thos. W. Harding, lt.-col.; Capt. Thos. Shields, adjutant; Rd. Varley, quarter master; Geo. P. Kelly & John W. Scarth. surgeons; Rev. Jas. H. McCheane, hon.-chaplain.

West Riding Yorkshire (2nd) Engineer Volunteers, head quarters, Grove House lane; Wm. Child, lieut.-col.; Capt. John McArthur, adjutant; quarter master, vacant; John A. Nunneley & Chas. Richardson, surgeons; J. Me K. Hollingsworth R.N. acting surgeon; Rev, N. Greenwell B.A. acting chaplain.

West Riding Yorkshire (7th) Rifle Volunteers, head quarters, Oxford row, Major A. R. Harding; major in command, Major Henry L. Hunt, adjutant; James S. Loe & Francis E. Atkinson, surgeons; Rev. John Gott, acting chaplain; Andrew Palmer, sergeant-major.

West York (4th) Militia, head quarters, barracks, Carlton st.; Wm. Pollard, lieut.-col. commandant; Lieut. Henry H.F. Eden, instructor of musketry; Capt. W. E. Hilliard, adjutant; John Knowles, quarter master; James Walker, medical officer.

LEEDS UNION

Offices, East parade (board day every Wednesday). Comprising the following Townships:—

PlaceAcresPopulation 1871Rateable ValueNumber of Guardians for each Township
Ex OffElected
Chapel— Allerton2,7473,84721,56212
Headingley— with-Burley3,05813,94288,09136
Leeds2,100139,362620,545318
Potternewton1,6573,45732,35912
Roundhay1,6305836,80711
Seacroft1,8131,2306,78212
13,005163,421776,1461031

Board of Overseers for the Township of Leeds.

In 1860, an Act of Parliament was obtained creating a separate Board of Overseers for the township of Leeds, entirely distinct from the Board of Guardians nominated & appointed by the magistrates for the borough, & incorporated under the name of the Board of Overseers of Leeds Offices, south parade; Board day, first Wednesday in every month.

Holbeck Union

The Workhouse for this township is situated on the Moor, & is a brick building in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1863, at a cost of £6,000, & available for 133 inmates; at the east end of the dining-hall, used also as a chapel, there is a stained window with a figure of Charity & the names of those guardians by whom the cost of its erection was defrayed; the main entrance contains the offices of the board & those of the clerk and overseers. The union comprises the following townships-Beeston, Churwell & Holbeck; rateable values, Holbeck, £52,195; Beeston, £13,438 & Churwell, £7,214. The acreage is, Holbeck, 611; Beeston, 1,535 & Churwell, 488. The population in 1871 was 17,165.

Hunslet Union

Hunslet union comprises the following places:-Hunslet, Middleton, Oulton-with-Woodlesford, Rothwell, Temple-Newsam & Thorp Stapleton. Rateable value, £190,071 Board day every alternate Wednesday at the Board room, Glasshouse street.

CEMETERIES

Leeds Burial Ground, Beckett street, Consecrated Portion, Rev. William Studdert Kennedy M.A. chaplain; Robert Sinclair, registrar, The Lodge, Burial grounds; Unconsecrated Portion, Rev. John Bell, registrar & clerk, The Lodge.

Leeds General Cemetery, Cemetery place, Woodhouse lane, Rev. D. W. Rowe, chaplain & registrar; Geo. Wood, sexton.

Holbeck Burial Grounds, Beeston hill, Holbeck, Consecrated Portion, Rev. Osmond Cookson M.A. chaplain; Tatham Kendrew, clerk & gravedigger, The Lodge: Unconsecrated Portion, Rev. William Holland, registrar, The Lodge.

Hunslet Burial Grounds, Woodhouse hill, Hunslet, Consecrated Portion, Rev. Edward Wilson B.A. chaplain; William Ramforth. clerk & gravedigger, The Lodge; Unconsecrated Portion, James Hornier, registrar; Albert Hunter Pickles, clerk & gravedigger, The Lodge.

ALMSHOUSES & HOMES

Boys’ Refuge & shoe Black Brigade, 29 Brunswick terrace, Elisha Waite, manager.

Convent of Our Lady of Mercy, Epworth place, Hunslet, Miss Geraldine Mayer, superioress.

Girls' Lodging House, 11 Marshall street, Holbeck, Mrs. Mary Lister, matron.

Harrison’s Almshouses, 57 Raglan road.

Ivy Lodge Convalescent Home, York road, Rev. Canon Jackson, hon. Sec.; W. Lupton, esq. treasurer; Mrs. Mary Simpson, matron.

Jenkinson’s Almshouses, St. Mark’s road, Woodhouse.

Leeds Girls’ Industrial Home, 77 Windsor street, Mrs. A. Lyons, matron; Miss Gledhill, schoolmistress.

Potter’s Almshouses.

St. Columba street Joseph’s Home, Consort terrace, M. L. de Gonzague, superioress.

St. Joseph’s Home for Girls, Richmond street.

St. Mary’s Convent Orphanage for Girls, Church street, Richmond hill.

St. Saviour’s Home, Knostrop lodge, Knostrop, sister Agnes, mother superior.

St. Saviour’s House of Charity, East street, sister Caroline, lady superior.

St. Vincent’s Home for Boys, 4 Willow Grove road, Mrs, McGommell, matron.

Servants’ Home, 44 St. Alban St. Miss Jane steward, matron.

West Riding Penitentiary & Guardian Asylum, 14 St. James’ street, John Barries jun. secretary; Miss Milne, matron.

PLACES OF WORSHIP.

CHURCHES.

*** V. Signifies Vicarage. P.C. Perpetual Curacy

NameLocalityIncumbentPatronValuePopHours of Service
MornAftEvenWeek days
St. Peter’s (parish Church), VKirkgateRev. John Gott D.DTrustees£ 1,30023,74710.303.156.30daily 7.30 a.m. 9.45 a.m. 4 (choral) 7.30
All saints, VYork roadRev. George Frederick GibbsCrown& Bishop of Ripon3009,28310.303.156.30p.m Wed. 7.30 p.m.
All Hallows (temporary wooden)Alexandra groRev. Arthur William septimus Albert Row B.AVicar of Burley20010.303.006.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
All souls (Hook Memorial)Blackman laneRev. Cecil Hook B.A. (curate in charge)Vicar of Leeds2007,00010.306.30
Christchurch, VMeadow laneRev. John Greenwood smith M.AVicar of Leeds2606,59410.303.306.30
EmmanuelWoodhouse laneRev. Charles Llewelyn Ivens M.ATrustees15010.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
Holy Trinity, P.CBoar laneRev. Jas. Henry McCheane MAVicar of Leeds, Recorder of Leeds, &Vicar of St. John’s, Leeds50010.306.30wed.& Fri. 11 a.m.
Holy Trinity, New Wortley, P.CCanal streetRev. Joseph Maughan T.A.K.C.LBishop of Ripon20010.303.156.30wed. 7.80 p.m.
St. Agnes (temporary)Shakespeare stRev. T. J. HamertonBishop10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Alban, VSaville greenRev. James WhalleyBishop20010.303.156.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Andrew's, VCavendish StRev. Benjamin Mills M.AFive Trustees3406,06110.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Augustine’s, Wrangthom, VHyde Park comerRev. Jas. Boultbee T.A.K.C.LCrown& Bishop of Ripon1502,22410.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Barnabas, Brewery fields, VSweet street, HolbeckRev. Nicholas Greenwell B.ACrown& Bishop of Ripon3008,0277.30 10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Chad, Far Headingley, VThomas Cartwright Smyth LL.D., D.DSir Edmund Beckett bart2701,162
St. Clement’s, Sheepscar, VChapeltown rdRev. Thomas S. Fleming F.R.G.SBishop of Ripon2186,28910.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Cuthbert’s (temporary)Kirkland street, HunsletRev. Herbert Marsh sims B.A10.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. Edmund, VProvidence stRev. Wm. Joha MargettaBishop20010.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. George's, VGreat George stRev. Charles E. Lamb M.AFive Trustees50011,90810.303.006.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Hilda (in course of erection)Cross Green laRev. Edgcumbe Staley B.A. (curate in charge)7.15 10.153.006.30daily 7.30 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.
St. James’ (Proprietary)York streetCanon Edward Jackson LL.B., M.AVicar of Leeds15010.306.30
St. John the Baptist, New Wortley, VLord street.,Rev. Stephen Pering Lampen PH.DCrown& Bishop of Ripon32013,64610.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. John the Baptist, Newtown, VRobson streetRev. Samuel Stretford Sambrick BABishop of Ripon2155,72510.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. John the Evangelist, VNew BriggateRev. Canon Henry Temple in AVicar, Mayor & Three Aldermen5505,0827.30 10.303.307.15daily 10 a.m. & 4.30 p.m.
St. John the Evangelist, Little Holbeck, VSweet street, West HolbeckRev. William Barnes HAH. C. Marshall esq3002,64010.302.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
St. Jude’s, Pottery Field, VHunslet roadRev. John Chute M.ACrown& Bishop of Ripon3007,18510.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Luke’s, Holbeck, P.CMalvern roadRev. John Lobley M.ASeven Trustees2008,0007.30 10.302.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. Luke’s, Sheepscar, VNorth streetRev. Charles Harley Drummond Williams M.AVicar of Leeds3004,8568.000 10.302.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.

NameLocalityIncumbentPatronValuePopHours of Service
MornAftEvenWeek days
St. Martin, Potternewton, VFrancis Charles Kilner M.AFive Trustees£ 3003,457
St. Mark’s, Wood-house, VSt. Mark’s roadRev. James swift AbbottTrustees3666,90810.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Mary’s, VQuarry hillRev. William Studdert Kennedy M.AVicar of Leeds3007,88010.303. 06.30mon. Wed. & Fri. 7.30 p.m.
St. Mary’s (temporary), New WortleyTong roadRev. James Alfred Pink (curate in charge)10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Mary the Virgin, Hunslet, VChurch streetRev. Edward Wilson B.ABishop of Ripon30012,67510.306.30wed. 7 p.m.
St. Matthew’s, Little London, VCamp roadRev. Ernest Graham Ingham M.ACrown& Bishop of Ripon2367,26810.303.306.30mon. Tue. Thur. & Sat. 8 a.m. & 8 p.m.; Wed. & Fri. 10.30 a.m. & 4.30 p.m.
St. Matthew’s, Holbeck, P.CSt. Matthew stRev. Osmond Cookson M.AVicar of Leeds30010,2068.30 10.307.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Matthias, VBurleyRev. Edwin spencer Gough M.ATrustees2766,40010.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
St. Michael, VHeadingleyRev. Frederick John Wood M.AVicar of Leeds50010.307.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Michael's, Buslingthorpe, VBuslingthorpe laneRev. Edgar H. Rand M.AFive Trustees3205,29410.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Paul’s, VPark squareRev. John Remington Stratten T.A.K.C.LVicar of Leeds3004,26710.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Peter’s, VHunslet moorRev. John Hy. Evans B.ABishop of Ripon2007,85610.303.006.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Philip’s, VWellington StRev. Thomas GleaveCrown& Bishop of Ripon2003,25811. 03.007.0wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Saviour’s, VCavalier hill, East streetRev. John Wylde M.ATrustees2858,5727.15 8.00 10.303.006.30daily 7.30 a.m. 8.15 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.
St. Silas, P.CGoodman St. HunsletRev. Richard Collins M.ABishop of Ripon2005,96510.302.506.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Simon’s, VVentnor streetRev. Saml. Augustus Edwd. Elworthy Brooking B.ABishop of Ripon2003,71510.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Stephen’s, Burmantofts, VAccommodation roadRev. Charles Augustus Hulbert, jun. M.AFive Trustees3009,29410.303.156.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Thomas’s, Leylands, VMelbourne StRev. William Dunn M.AVicar of Leeds2306,0178. 10.303.006.30daily 8 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.
Church of England Mission Rooms
Emmanuel25 St. James’s street3.00thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. James’ (Boatman’s)Warehouse hill6.30
St. John the BaptistBruce street, New WortleyRev. W. Steadman 10.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. Judes' (Church)Myrtle street, HunsletRev. John Chute M.A6.30thurs. 8 p.m.
St. Mark’sWoodhouse street6.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. Peter'sNew station street6.30
St. Simon’sMeynell street6.30tues. 7.30 p.m.
Catholic and Other Denominations
Name. St. Ann’s CathedralLocality. Park rowPriests. Very Rev. Provost Richard Browne Very Rev. Canon James W. Gordon Rev. James F. Downes Rev. Charles Crosskell7, 8, 9.30 & 113.006.30mon. Tue. & Thur.7, 7.30, 8 & 9; Fri. 7 p.m.;sat.4 p.m.
Church of the Holy Family, New WortleyGreen laneRev. Dennis Collins10.306.30
St. Bridget’sRegent streetRev. Canon Edward Watson11.006.30daily 7.30 a.m.
St. Joseph’s, HunsletSt. Joseph street, Hunslet rdVery Rev. Dr. de Thury8, 9& 10.103.007.30 a.m.
St. MarysRichmond hill, Church streetRev. John Gobert Rev. Yictor Fick Rev. Thomas Furlong Rev. James O’Reilly7, 8, 9.30 & 113.006.30daily 7, 7.30 & 8 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.
St. Patrick'sYork roadRev. Edward Watson Rev. Aloysius Dekker Rev. John A. Wald Rev. Andrew Leonard11.006.30thurs. 8 p.m.
Friends’Great Wilson street10.306.30
Friends'Woodhouse lane10.306.30wed. 10 a.m.
Jewish synagogue (foreign)20 St. Alban street7.308.00sat. 8.30 a.m.& 5.30 p.m.
Jews’ synagogueBelgrave streetsat. 8 a.m. & 2 & 5 p.m. &
PresbyterianWoodhouse laneRev. John Clelland10.306.30daily 8 p.m Wed. 7.30 p.m.
United PresbyterianCavendish roadRev. Duncan Sillars10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
Baptist
Burley roadW.R. Golding10.456.30mon. 8 p.m.
Cemetary road, Holbeck10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
Cross Chancellor streetVarious10.456.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Low road, HunsletAlfred Edward Greening10.306.00thure. 7.30 p.m.
Locality. North. streetPriests10.306. 0
South paradeGeorge Hill M.A10.306.30thurs. 7.15 p.m.
Wellington roadVarious10.302.306.00thurs. 8 p.m.
Wintoun streetWilliam Sharman F.R.H.S10.306.30
Woodhouse laneJoseph William Butcher10.306.307.30 p.m.
York roadJames Smith10.306. 0thurs. 7.30 p.m.
St. James’s streetJoseph Clough10.306.30tues. 7 p.m.
Congregational
Beeston roadGeorge Williams10.306.30thurs. 7.15 p.m.
Cross Belgrave streetJohn Gregory10.306.30thurs. 7.15 p.m.
East paradeEustace R. Conder M.A10.306.30thurs. 7.15 p.m.
HeadingleyAlbert H. Byles B.A. & Rev. T. Selvan
Hunslet laneGeorge Hinds10.306.30mon.

7.15 p.m.

Marshall streetWilliam Currie10.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
Mount Tabor place, Burmantofts streetJohn Anderson10.306.307.30 p.m.
Oak road, New WortleyJohn Gregory10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
Queen streetWilliam Thomas10.306.30mon. 7 p.m.
Sheepscar streetJohn Gregory10.306.30tues. 7.30 p.m.
South Accommodation road, HunsletT. H.Heap10.456.307.30 p.m.
Woodsley road10.456.30wed. 7.45 p.m.
Methodist New Connexion
Dewsbury roadVarious10.306. 0wed. 7.30 p.m.
Hunslet CarrVarious10.306.30tues. 7.30 p.m.
Hunslet roadVarious10.306. 0wed. 7.30 p.m.
Kirkstall roadVarious10.306. 0tues. 7.30 p.m.
Lion streetVarious10.306. 0tues. 7 p.m.
St. Philip streetVarious10.306. 0
Tong road, ArmleyVarious10.306. 0
Ventnor streetVarious10.306. 0tues. 7.30 p.m.
Woodhouse laneVarious10.306. 0mon. 7 p.m.
Wookdhouse streetVarious10.306. 0tues. 7.30 p.m.
Primitive Methodist
1st Circuit
Byron street Chapel street, Quarry hillG. Bell & Warren10.30 10.306.00thurs.7.30 p.m Mon. 7.30 p.m.
Meanwood road10.306.00mon. 7.30 p.m.
Richmond hill (Bourne)G. Bell10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
StanksG. Warren6.00thurs. 7 p.m.
York road (Temple Vue)10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
2nd Circuit
Beeston6.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Beeston Far fields6.00wed. 7 p.m.
Beeston hillW. Bennett10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
Princes field10.306.00mon. 7.30 p.m.
10.306.00thurs. 7.30 p.m.
3rd Circuit
Bagby road (Eldon)superintendants: G. W. Armitage, E. Dixon, R. Eaglew E.Parkin M.A. D.Sheen10.306.00wed. 7 p.m.
Belle Vue road10.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
Cardigan road (Burley Iron)10.306.00mon. 7.30 p.m.
Kirkstall (Ebenezer)10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Park lane (Rehoboth)10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
4th Circuit
Dewsbury road6.00thurs. 7.30 p.m.
Jack lane, Hunslet10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
RothwellS. Lloyd6.00tues. 7 p.m.
StourtonP. Neeme6.00
Woodhouse hill6.00thurs. 7.30 p.m.
5th Circuit
Armley10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
Bramley10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Eleven Lane endsT. Smith10.306.00thurs.7.30 p.m.
Hough endM. Moseley10.306.00mon. 7.30 p.m.
Roker Lane top10.306.00mon. 7.30 p.m.
6th Circuit
Farnley10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Silver Royd hillG. Shaw10.306.00thurs.7.30 p.m.
SouthfieldT. Pearson10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
Lower Wortley10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
Unitarian
Domestic streetVarious10.456.00
Mill hill, Park rowCharles Hargrove M.A10.306.30
St. Joseph street, HunsletMickael Smith Dunbar11.06.30
United Methodist Free Church
Lady Lane Circuit
Beckett street11.06.30wed. 7 p.m.
Bristol street, Cross Stamford street6.00
East streetSamuel Saxon Barton10.306.00
Lady laneAlfred Winfield10.306.00
Proctor's place, Meanwood roadA. Chadwick10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Roundhay roadG. Graves10.306.30wed. 7.30 p.m.
St. Mark's streetEdwin Whatmough10.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
Wilson street, Hunslet10.306.00wed. 7.30 p.m.
Leeds South Circuit
Between 89 & 91 Meadow road, HolbeckHenry Holgate10.306.00
Leeds West Circuit
Burley lawnRalph Abercrombie M.A10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Tong road, New WortleyT. Letcher10.306.30
Whitehall road, New WortleyGeorge Robinson10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Wesleyan Methodist
Brunswick Circuit
Brunswick streetAntony ward Walter G. Hall William H. Clogg Alfred Martyn John Kinnings John Walters Robert Lewis10.306.30wed. 7 p.m.
Chapeltown road10.306.30mon. 7 p.m.
Lincoln fields, Cherry row, New town10.306.30tues.

7 p.m.

Roscoe place10.306.30mon. 7 p.m.
Woodhouse street10.306.30tues. 7 p.m.
Woodhouse Carr, Meanwood road10.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
Oxford Place Circuit
Hanover place10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Hyde Park roadS. Walker J.S. Vint F.B. Sandbank S.T. House G. Woodcook10.306.30Wed. 7 p.m.
Isles place, Holbeck10.306.00mon. 7 p.m.
Kirkstall road, Holbeck10.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
Oxford place10.306.30mon. 7 p.m.
Shadwell10.306.00mon. 7 p.m.
Woodhouse moor10.306.30wed. 7 p.m.
New Wortley10.306.00tues, 7 p.m.
St. Peter’s Circuit
Accommodation road, Richomn hill10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Becket streetJ.M. Walmsley S. Forrest D. Solomon R. Stepney10.306.00wed. 7 p.m.
Old bethel6.00tues. 7 p.m.
Colton10.306.00tues. 7 p.m.
Garforth10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Halton10.306.00tues. 7 p.m.
Seacroft10.306.00mon. 7 p.m.
Armley Circuit
Armley, Wesley road10.306.00tues. 7 p.m.
Armley, Whingate10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
FarnleyW. Shaw10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
HorsforthS. H. Morton10.306.00wed. 7 p.m.
Lane sideA. Pearce2.006.30tues. 7 p.m.
RodleyW. A. Simcox10.306.00tues. 7 p.m.
Woodside10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Wortley10.306.00thurs.7.30 p.m.
Wesley Circuit10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Belle Isle2.30wed. 7 p.m.
Meadow lane (Beeston hill)S. S. Gregory10.306.00mon. 7 p.m.
MiddletonA. B. Gardiner10.306.00wed. 7 p.m.
St. Peter's street (Wesley)S. B. Williams10.306.00mon. 7 p.m.
Stourton10.306.00thurs. 7 p.m.
Waterloo road, Hunslet10.306.00tues. 7 p.m.
Headingley Circuit
Headingley10.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
Par Headingley6.30
Kirkstall10.306.30thurs. 7 p.m.
Meanwood10.306.00tues. 7.30 p.m.
Other Denomonations
Catholic ApostolicSt. James’s streetVarious6.0 & 10.06.00wed. 9 a.m.
Christadelphian Meeting RoomInfirmary street6.30
Latter Day saints’ Meeting HouseHunslet road2.306.30thurs. 7.30 p.m.
New Church (Swedenborgian)Albion walkVarious10.306.30tues. 7.30 p.m.
Wesleyan Methodist AssociationCaroline streetVarious10.306.00wed. 7 p.m.
Mission Rooms
Baptist (Blenheim)Camp roadJohn William Coles10.306.15
Brethren29 York placeVarious10.06.30
CongregationalDerby crescent, Dewsbury rdVarious10.302.306.30
CongregationalNorth Hall streetVarious10.306.00tues. 7.15 p.m.
CongregationalWoodhouse streetVarious10.306.00thurs.7.30 p.m.
Methodist New ConnexionBower road, HunsletVarious10.306.00
WesleyanKennedy streetVarious6.30thurs. 8 p.m.
WesleyanWesley streetVariousoccasional

COLLEGES & SCHOOLS

Yorkshire College, Lord F. C. Cavendish M.P. president; W. B. Denison esq. treasurer; Sir E. Baines, chairman of the council; William Foot Husband esq. LL.B. registrar & sec.; A. W. Rucker M.A., professor of mathematics & experimental physics; T. E. Thorpe PH.D., F.R.S., F.C.S. chemistry; A. H. Green M.A., F.G.S, geology & mining; Arnold Lupton C.E., F.G.S. coal mining instructor; L. C. Miall F.G.S; biology: G. F. Armstrong M.A., F.G.S., C.E. civil & mechanical engineering; John Marshall M.A. classical literature & history & mental & moral science, Cyril Ransome M.A. modern literature & history; John Willis PH.D. french; Joseph Strauss PH.D. german & oriental languages; temporary premises, Cookridge street. Textile department, College road, John Beaumont, textile industries instructor; J.J. Hummell F.C.S. dyeing instructor.

The Free Grammar school, on St.John’s hill, Moorland rd. Woodhouse Moor, is an elegant stone structure in the Early Decorated style, free to all boys of the parish & endowed with houses & land producing over £3,000 yearly, the headmaster having a salary of £500 (with capitation fees) & residence. There are six exhibitions of £50 a year each, tenable for four years at Oxford, Cambridge or Durham; boys of the school are also eligible to eight scholarships, average value £80, founded by Dr. Milner at Magdalene College, Cambridge; & to Lady Hastings’ exhibitions of Queen’s College, Oxford, of which three (value £90) are open to competition every year. There are about 280 scholars; Rev. William George Henderson D.C.L, headmaster; Rev. Archdale Wilson Tayler M.A. Rev. M. S. Hill M.A. Rev. F. Glover M.A. Rev. H. A. Powys B.A. J. C. Gibson B.A. and six other assistant masters, with six occasional masters Clergy school, Clarendon house, Clarendon road, Leeds, Rev. William Methven Gordon Ducat M.A. head lecturer Rev. H. L. Paget M.A. assistant lecturer Leeds Mechanics’ Institution (Commercial & Mathematical), Cookridge street; (day, for boys), Thos. Horsman, B.A. master; Jonathan Ogden Dayson, sec Leeds school of Art & science, Cookridge street, Andrew Stevenson, master; Jonathan Ogden Dayson, sec Leeds Middle Class, Willow Terrace road, Edwin Ison, headmaster; Miss Jane Sothern, mistress Leeds Moral Industrial Training school, erected at a cost of £16,000, is an Elizabethan building, occupying a commanding site, with a frontage of 276 feet, Beckett st.; Jsph E. Hardwick, governor; Mrs. Rachel Hardwick, matron Wesleyan Training College, Headingley lane, Headingley, Rev. Benjamin Hellier, governor; Rev. John S. Banks & Rev. Robert N. Young, masters.

Board Schools

Name of SchoolDepartmentTeachersNo. on RollAverage Attendance
*+ Alfred Cross streetMixedMr. H. Columbine303199
*+ ArmleyBoysMr. Joseph Peascock327232
*+ ArmleyGirlsMiss Marie Compston293209
*+ ArmleyInfantsMiss Jane Barker227157
*BeestonMixedMr. W. A.Teale260208
*BeestonInfantsMrs. M. Fenton145104
*+ Beeston hillBoysMr. Thomas London294217
*+ Beeston hillGirlsMiss Jane Ann Fleming204144
*+ Beeston hillInfantsMiss Sarah A. Harrison 200142
*+ Bewerley streetBoys368312
*+ Bewerley streetGirlsMiss Mary E. Whatmoor384278
*+ Bewerley streetInfantsMiss E. M. Cain362262
*+ BramleyMixedMr. T. W. Harrison336207
*+ BramleyInfantsMiss A. Moore171112
*+ Bramley lawnBoysMr. William H. Bosher259190
*+ Bramley lawnGirlsMrs. Mary L. Trotter 196138
*+ Bramley lawnInfantsMrs. Elizabeth Welch188122
*+ Burley roadBoysMr. George W. Welch240186
*+ Burley roadGirlsMiss L. Lawson281198
*+ Burley roadInfantsMiss Alice Holdsworth307178
Canal streetInfantsMiss Elizabeth Gough11285
*+ Carlton hill (Blackman lane)BovsMr. Elijah Barber309244
*+ Carlton hill (Blackman lane)GirlsMrs. Charlotte E. Bettany328239
*+ Carlton hill (Blackman lane)InfantsMrs. Helena Barber271189
*+ ChapeltownMixedMr. B. Faulkner187131
*+ ChapeltownInfantsMiss Branan10165
*+ Cross Stamford streetBoysMr. William Helmn257184
*+ Cross Stamford streetGirlsMiss Maria L. Coxe226168
*+ Cross Stamford streetInfantsMiss Annie Boyle226159
*+ Ellerby laneBoysMr. William Liddle264193
*+ Ellerby laneGirlsMiss E. Ellis192118
*+ Ellerby laneInfantsMiss Martha Judson257170
* FarnleyBoysMr. J. V. Parminter133111
* FarnleyGirlsMiss M. Bateson131101
* FarnleyInfantsMiss J. I. Ashworth10778
*+ Green laneBoysMr. William John Hill328273
*+ Green laneGirlsMiss Lucy E. Butler354252
*+ Green laneJuniorsMr. Isaac M. Green284230
*+ Green laneInfantsMiss Selina Shaw416270
*+ Hunslet CarrBoysMr. William Holroyd282186
*+ Hunslet CarrGirlsMiss M. Markland370193
*+ Hunslet CarrInfantsMiss E. Bower196144
*+ Low roadBoysMr. George James Price276229
*+ Low roadGirlsMiss Martha E. Thrippleton257164
*+ Low roadInfantsMiss Catherine Veale287181
*+ Hunslet St. Peter’s, Dewsbury roadBoysMr. Alfred Ridge343266
*+ Hunslet St. Peter’s, Dewsbury roadGirlsMrs. S. Fieldhouse308224
*+ Hunslet St. Peter’s, Dewsbury roadInfantsMiss Jane Barron377285
*+ Jack laneBoysMr. William Burton306236
*+ Jack laneGirlsMiss A. Blakeborough325229
*+ Jack laneInfantsMiss C. D. Kendall289190
*+ KirkstallBoysMr. W. G. Crosthwaite152128
*+ KirkstallGirlsMiss K. Stevens208150
*+ KirkstallInfantsMrs. M. A. Lindley194131
* Leylands (Gower street)BoysMr. Tom Tomlinson288205
* Leylands (Gower street)GirlsMiss Mary A. Soutar191114
* Leylands (Gower street)InfantsMiss Mary Spybey395151
*+ Little Holbeck, Sweet street west formerly Marshalls’s factory schoolsBoysMr. Joseph H. G. Saul339228
*+ Little Holbeck, Sweet street west formerly Marshalls’s factory schoolsGirlsMiss Sarah Gregson302236
*+ Little Holbeck, Sweet street west formerly Marshalls’s factory schoolsInfantsMiss Agnes Shepherd211136
*+ Mill green (Croydon street)MixedMiss Frances T. Conde369252
*+ Zlon (Whitshall road)BoysMr. Edward Moore335236
*+ Zlon (Whitshall road)GirlsMrs. Hannah Barmby264177
*+ Zion (Whitshall road)InfanteMiss Hannah Mann246173
*+ Oak roadMixedMr. J. Mills290227
* Old FarnleyMixedMr. G. Humpheryes242179
* Old FarnleyInfantsMiss A. E. Gaunt
*+ Park laneBoysMr. Jose Rickard314229
*+ Park laneGirlsMiss Louisa Augusta Crosfield283172
*+ Park laneInfantsMiss Elizabeth Strickland222162
*+ Pottery Field, Leathley rd. HunsletMixedMr. John Shackleton311200
*+ Pottery Field, Leathley rd. HunsletInfantsMiss Sarah Topham14692
* Primrose Hill (Darby street)BovsMr. Jesse Bettany275209
* Primrose Hill (Darby street)GirlsMiss Georgina Little340228
* Primrose Hill (Darby street)InfantsMiss Sarah Hannah Richardson340221
'*+ Princes Field (Clowes street)MixedMr. William Henry Haler352281
*+ Princes Field (Clowes street)InfantsMiss Charlotte Barnicoat277203
* RodleyMixedMr. A. H. Taylor234168
*+ Roundhay roadBoysMr. Thomas Woolfenden305241
*+ Roundhay roadGirlsMiss Margaret A. Niddry257172
*+ Roundhay roadInfantsMiss Kate Burrow267183
* St. Peter’s squareBoysMr. James White353207
* St. Peter’s squareGirlsMiss Emma Coggill252163
* St. Peter’s squareInfantsMiss Caroline Wildblood234147
*+ Salem (Salem place)MixedMr. George Welpton210144
*+ Salem (Salem place)InfantsMiss E. Chippemndale9763
*Saville greenMixedMr. William A. West277197
*Saville greenInfantsMrs. Sarah A. Cooper183117
*+ SheepscarBoysMr. John D. Crosfield275208
*+ SheepscarGirlsMiss Annie J.Coxe329225
*+ SheepscarInfantsMrs. Jane Ann Sutcliffe273180
*+ South Accommodation roadBoysMr. Johnson Fenwick236191
*+ South Accommodation roadGirlsMrs. Isabella Heys220150
*+ South Accommodation roadInfantsMiss Sarah Abbishaw202130
*+ StanningleyMixedMr. S. L.

Fawcett

337217
*+ Sweet streetBoysMr. Edwin Fairbrother320216
*+ Sweet streetGirlsMiss Mary Ann Hird275190
*+ Sweet streetInfantsMiss Matilda Bell190150
*+ Woodhouse (Woodhouse street)BoysMr. Robert Whitehead340210
*+ Woodhouse (Woodhouse street)GirlsMiss Henrietta Kay305183
*+ Woodhouse (Woodhouse street)InfantsMiss M. J. Young297183
*+ Woodsley roadMixedMr. John Brownfoot310230
*+ Lower WortleyMixedMr. W. Blain391269
*+ Upper WortleyBoysMr. E. Howe264200
*+ Upper WortleyGirlsMiss M. Thomas220141
*+ Upper WortleyInfantsMrs. H. Moyes203133
*+ Silver Royd hillMixedMiss Ellen Sunderland135100
*+ GreensideMixedMr. J. Petty279211
*+ York roadBoysMr. William Cockerlyne377269
*+ York roadGirlsMiss S. E. Firth325208
*+ York roadInfantsMiss Martha Bowker307219
*+ York roadTotal29,40920,517

National & Pabochial schools.

All saints’ National (boys, girls & infants), York road, Alfred Smith. master; Miss Grace Godson, mistress; Miss Flora Robinson, infants’ mistress.

British (mixed), Basinshall St. Miss Alice Hurst, mistress.

British, Cliff road, Woodhouse, Miss Harriet Greaves, mistress.

Christ Church National (girls & infants) Church Cross street, Mrs. A Bradshaw, mistress; Miss Wade, infants’ mistress.

Far Headingley (girls & infants), Mrs. Hannah Petty, mistress.

Headingley National, John Thackeray, master; Mrs. Mary Ann Thackeray, mistress.

St. Andrew's National, Cavendish street, Burley road, Arthur Pedley, master; Miss Maria Morley, mistress; Miss Margaret Puyravel, infants’ mistress.

St. Barnabas National (girls & infants), Jack lane, Hunslet, Miss Wright, mistress.

St. George’s National, Clarendon road, Everett Bishop Turner, master; Miss Emma Jane Shaw, mistress; Miss Alice Godson, infants’ mistress.

St. Hilda’s National (boys, girls & infants), Cross Green lane, William Inglis, master; Miss Fryer, mistress; Miss Elizabeth Kirk, infants’ mistress.

St. John’s Free, Mark lane, founded in 1705, has an endowment of £400 per annum, Mrs. Ann Brumpton, mistress.

St. John the Baptist, Pear street, New town, Robert Harris, master: Miss Richardson, mistress; Miss Sarah Elizabeth Walkington, infants’ mistress.

St. John the Baptist National, Whitehall road, New Wortley, Herbert Crowther, master; Miss Mary Cubbom, mistress; Miss Margaret Cubborn, infants’ mistress.

St. John the Evangelist National, Grove House lane, Henry Blaker, master; Miss Annie Myers, mistress; Miss Henrietta Morrish, infants’ mistress.

St. Jude’s National, Leathley road, George Hamlett, master; Miss Felicia Evans, mistress; Miss Eliza Pullin, infants’ mistress.

St. Luke’s Church, Malvern road, Holbeck, Benjamin Eaton, master; Mrs. Allsop.mistress; Miss Nicholson, infants’ mistress.

St. Luke’s National, North street, Benjamin Dexter, master; Miss Jessie Guthrie, mistress; Miss Emily saddler, infants’ mistress.

St. Mark’s National, Raglan road, George Wever, master; Miss Martha Rushworth. mistress; Miss Grace Hartley, infants’ mistress.

St. Mary’s (infants), Carver street, Miss Ada Gant, mistress.

St. Mary’s (girls & infants), Grimston street, Miss Emily Rhodes, mistress; Miss Kate Barker, infants’ mistress.

St. Mary’s National (boys & girls), Church street, Hunslet, George B. Newton, master; Miss A. Carr, mistress; Miss Ann Maria Simpson, infants’ mistress.

St. Mary’s National, (boys), St. Mary’s lane, Quarry hill, Herbert Columbine, master; Charles W. Wilkinson, assistant master.

St. Matthew’s, St. Matthew’s street, Holbeck, George Archer, master; Miss Catherine summers, mistress; Miss Mary sawyer, infants’ mistress.

St. Matthew’a National, (boys & girls), Camp road, George Tinker, master; Miss Mary Hilly mistress, infants’ school, Reuben street, Mrs. Sarah Johnson, mistress.

St. Matthias, Burley, William Johnson Robinson, master; Mrs. Wallram, mistress; Miss Carter, infants’ mistress.

St. Michael’s National, Meanwood road, William Harris, master; Miss Mary Ann Gargrave, mistress; Mrs. Amelia Armitage, infants’ mistress.

St. Paul's National,Saville street, Thomas Fletcher, master; Miss Sophia Mary Stirk, infants’ mistress.

St. Peter’s National (boys), Kirkgate, (girls & infants), The Calls, James Henry Broscomb, masters Miss Sarah Hannah swales, mistress; Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Scholefield, infants’ mistress.

St. Peter’s Church (infants), St. Peter’s square, Miss A. Wrigglesworth. mistress.

St. Philip's National, Wellington street, Walter Jowett, master; Miss Helena Mary Forsyth. mistress.

St. Saviour’s (mixed), East street, James Child, master; Miss Jane Elizabeth Exley, infants’ mistress.

St. Silas’ National, Goodman street, Hunslet, Henry Snowdon, master; Miss Jane Willis, mistress; Miss Emma Liddell, infants’ mistress.

St. Simon’s National, Ventnor street, George Wright, master; Miss Emma Shelfield, mistress; Miss Elizabeth Darby, infants’ mistress

St. Stephen’s National (mixed), Accommodation road, William Henry Ford, master; Miss Frances Eleanor Whitworth. infants’ mistress.

Catholic schools

St. Joseph’s Catholic Diocesan seminary, Springfield house, Springfield mount, very Rev. W. Canon Gordon, D.D. rector; Rev. Joseph Rappenhoner, D.D. professor; Rev. Augustus Miller, D.D. professor.

Cookridge street (The Cathedral) boys & young men’s hall, Francis J. B. Cox, master.

Charles street, St. Peter’s road, Joseph Travers, assistant master; Oblate sisters, mistresses

Church street (St. Mary’s), William Noblett, master; Miss Henagan, mistress.

Guildford street (girls & infants), The sisters of Charity of St. Paul’s, teachers

Joseph street, Hunslet (St. Joseph), The sisters of Mercy, headmistresses.

York road (St. Patrick) (girls & infants), sisters of St. Paul, mistresses.

The Calls (St. Vincent), Miss Eliza Riordan, mistress; Miss Susie Naughton, infants’ mistress.

Wesleyan schools.

Balm walk, Holbeck, James Coles, master; Miss Ellen Shelton, mistress.

Darley street, John Graham Wood, master; Miss Brannan, mistress; Mrs. Sarah Ann Wood, infants’ mistress.

Greenfield road, Wesley Edwin Brookes, master; Miss Blakebrough, infants’ mistress.

Hyde Park road, Miss Martha Livesey, mistress Leathley road, Hunslet, John Shackleton, master; Miss Fanny Hirst, mistress.

Oxford row, George Hill, master; Mrs. Rickards, infants’ mistress.

CONVEYANCE

OMNIBUSES AND COACHES

Adel-Leaves ‘ Three Horses shoes, ’ Headingley, 8.30 a.m. & 5.0 p.m. Returns from Adel, 8.50 a.m. & 5.50 p.m.

Armley-Turton’s 'bus office, Market street, Briggate, 9.0, 10.0, 11.0 & 12.0 a.m.; 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0 & 8.0 p.m. Armley, to Leeds, 9.30, 10.30 & 11.30 a.m.; 12.30, 1.30, 2.30, 3.30, 4.30, 5.30, 6.30, 7.30 & 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, to Armley, at 9.0 & 10.0 p.m.; from Armley, at 9 30 & 10.30 p.m.

Aberford & Barwick-‘ New inn, Vicar lane, Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays, 4.30 p.m. & ‘ Black swan, 'Vicar lane, 4.0 p.m.

Beeston Hill & Malvern road.-Leaves Market street, Briggate at 8.15, 9.0, 9.30, 10.0,10.30, 11.0, 11.30, 12.0, 12.30 p.m.; 1.0, 1.30, 2.0. 2.30, 3.0, 3.30, 4.0, 4.30, 5.0, 6.0, 6.30, 7.0, 7.30, 8.0, 8.30, 9.0 & 9.15; extra on Saturdays, 9.30, 10.0, 10.30, 11.0. Returns from Malvern road, 8.35 a.m. & every half hour till 9.35 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 10.5, 10,35, 11.0, 11.30 p.m.

Burmantofts, Briggate & Beeston Hill-Leaves Beeston hill for Briggate at 8.45 a.m. & every half hour until 9.15 p.m.; Saturday night, 5.45 & every’ half hour till 10.45 p.m. Leaves Commercial street for Burmantofts at 9.0, 10.0, 11.0 & 12.0 a.m.; 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0 & 8.0 p.m. Leaves Commercial street, for Beeston hill, at 10.0 & 11.0 a.m.; 12.5, 1.0, 1.30, 2.0, 3.0, 3.15, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 6.30, 7.0, 8.0, & 9.0 p.m.; Saturdays, 6.0 & every half hour until 11.0 p.m.; Sundays, 8.30 & 9.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, from Beeston hill to Briggate, at 7.30, 8.30, 9.30, 10.0 & 10.30 p.m. Leaves Burmautofts for Beeston hill, at 9.40, 10.40, 11.40, 12.40, 1.40, 2.40, 3.40, 4.40, 5.40, 6.40, 7.40 8.40 p.m; Saturday night, 9.15. From Briggate to York road, every hour.

Bramham-‘ Black swan, ’ Leeds, at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays. Leaves Bramham at 8 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays.

Camp road & Whitehall road-Turton’s 'bus office, Market St. Briggate, from 8.45 a.m. & every half hour till 8.45 p.m.

Dewsbury Road-From Market street, Briggate, at 8.20 a.m. & every twenty minutes till 9.40 p.m,; extra on Saturdays, 10, 10.20, 10.40 & 11 p.m. From New inn, Dewsbury road, at 8.40 a.m. & every twenty minutes till 10 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 10.20, 10.40 & 11.20 p.m.

Green Road & Briggate-Leaves Alexandra hotel, at 9 a.m. & every half-hour to 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 9, 9.30, 10, 10.30 & 11 p.m. Returns from Duncan street, Briggate, al 9.15 a.m. & every half-hour to 8.45 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 9.15, 9.45, 10.15, 10.45 & 11.15 p.m.

Halton, Whitkirk & Garforth-‘ Horse & Jockey, ’ daily, at 1 & 5 p.m. From Whitkirk at 9 a.m. & 2 p.m.; Saturdays, 6 p.m. for Briggate; returns to Whitkirk 9 p.m. Sundays, leaves Beeston hill for Garforth at 1.30 p.m. Briggate for Garforth. at 2 p.m. Garforth for Leeds, at 7 p.m. From Whitkirk on Saturdays at 6 p.m.; returning from ‘ Black swan ’ at 8.30 p.m.

Hunslet Carr-Leaves corner of Boar lane, every hour from 9 a.m. till 9 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 10 p.m. Leaves Hunslet Carr every hour from 8.30 a.m. till 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 9.30 p.m.

Kippax-Beehive, ’ Vicar lane, Tue. Thur. & Sat. at 4 p.m. From Kippax at 8.30 a.m. Tue. Thur. & sat.

Leopold street & spencer Place, New Leeds-Leaves every hour from 8.35 a.m. to 7.35 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 8.35 & 9.35 p.m. Returns from Duncan street every hour from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 9 & 10 p.m.

Meanwood Road & Briggate-Globe inn, Meanwood road, at 8.15 a.m. & every half-hour till 7.45 p.m. Returns from Briggate at 9 a.m. & every half-hour till 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, to 9.45 p.m Moorland Road Horticultural Gardens & Briggate-Leaves Market street, Briggate, via Belle Vue road, at 8 a.m. & every hour to 9 p.m. & via College road 8.30 a.m. & every hour to 9.30 p.m. Returns from Moorland road, via Belle Vue road, every hour from 8.30 a.m. to 9.80 p.m. & via College road, every hour from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, to 10 p.m.

Moortown-Leaves Chapeltown the Queen inn, at 8.30 & 9.30 a.m. 4.30 & 5.30 p.m. Leaves Moortown, ‘ Chained Bull, ’ at 8.55 & 10 a.m. 5 & 6 p.m. The ‘ bus’ will not run on Sundays.

New Wortley-Turton’s office, Market street, Briggate, every hour from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, up to 10 p.m. Returning from Queen inn, Wortley, every hour from 9.30 a.m. to 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, up to 10.30 p.m.

Roundhay-From Kirkgate corner, Briggate, at 9.10, 9.45, 10.25 & 11.10 a.m. 12.25, 12.50, 1.40, 2.10, 2.55, 3.25, 4.20, 4.50, 5.40, 6.10 & 7.10 p.m.; Saturdays only, 9.45 p.m. Leaves the Park gates at 8.30, 9, 9.50,10.30, 11.10 & 11.50 a.m. 1.5,1.30, 2.20, 2.50, 3.40,4.10, 5, 5.30, 6.30, 6.50 & 7.50 p.m. From Market street, Briggate, at 9.20, 10.40 & 12 a.m. 1.20, 2.40, 4, 5.20 & 6.40 p.m.; returns from Roundhay Park, at 8.45, 10.5 & 11.25 a.m., 12.45, 2.5, 3.25,4.45,6.5 & 7.25 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 8.15 p.m.

Seacroft-From ‘ Beehive, ’ Vicar lane, Mon. Tue. Wed. Thur. & Fri. at 12.30 & 5 p.m.; Saturdays at 3 & 9 p.m.; Sundays at 1.30 & 8.30 p.m. From Seacroft, on Monday a at 8.30 a.m, & 2 p.m.; Tuesdays, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.; Wed. Thur. & Fri. 2 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.; & sandays, 12.30 & 7.30 p.m.

Shadwell-‘ Black swan, Leeds, at 5 p.m.; leaves Shadwell, 8.30 a.m. extra on Saturdays, leaves Leeds, 2.30 & 10 p.m.

Francis street & spencer Place, New Leeds-Leaves Duncan street, Briggate, at 9.30 a.m. & every hour till 8.30 p.m. Leaves spencer place, at 9.5 a.m. & every hour till 8.5 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, from Briggate, at 9.30 & 10.30 p.m. Returns at 9.5 & 10.5 p.m.

Sweet street & Briggate-Leaves sweet street at 9 a.m. & every half hour to 8.30 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 9, 9.30, 10, 10.30 & 11 p.m. Returns from Briggate, 8.45 a.m. & every half hour to 8.15 p.m.; extra on Saturdays, 8.45, 9.15, 9.45, 10.15 & 10.45 p.m.

Thorner-New inn, Vicar lane, Tue. & Sat. 4 p.m. Leaves Thorner, Tue. & Sat. at 9 a.m.

West street & Briggate-Leaves Briggate at 8.30 a.m. & every half hour till 8 p.m. Returns from ‘ Beckett Arms, ’ Kirkstall road, 8.45 a.m. & every half hour till 8.15 p.m.

TRAMWAYS

Chapeltown (the Cross Roads) & Leeds-Night Light, Green-Leave Chapeltown (the Cross roads) at 8 a.m.& every 10 minutes until 10 p.m.; extra, on Saturdays, until 10.30 p.m.; returning from Leeds 8.30 a.m. & every 10 minutes until 10.30p.m.; extra, on Saturdays, till 11 p.m. The 10.15 & 10.30 p.m. cars run to the ‘Mexbro’ Arms’ only; & on Saturdays the 10.50 & 11 p.m. cars run to the ‘Mexbro’ Arms’ only. Sundays-Leave Chapeltown (Cross roads) at 10 a.m. & every half-hour till 9.30 p.m.; leave Boar lane at 10.30 a.m. & every half-hour till 10 p.m. during the winter months.

Note.-The Chapeltown cars will leave the Queen inn, Chapeltown, the first journey in the mornings at 7.55, 8.5, 8.15, 8.25, 8.35 & 8.45. The Meanwood road cars will leave the Chapeltown depot at 7.40, 7.50, 8 & 8.10 morning, & carry passengers to Leeds at the ordinary Chapeltown fares.

Headingley-Night Light, Red-The through Headingley tram cars every 15 minutes from 8 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.; every 10 minutes to 7.30 p.m.; then every 15 minutes to 10 p.m. Sundays, for Leeds every 30 minutes from 10 a.m. till 9.30 p.m. Returning from Leeds at 8.45 a.m. & every 15 minutes to 12 noon; every 10 minutes to 8 p.m.; then every 15 minutes to 10.30 p.m. Sundays, from Leeds, every half-hour from 10.30 a.m. till 10 p.m. during the winter months.

Hunslet-Night Light, Blue-Every 10 minutes from Hunslet from 8.5 a.m. to 10 p.m. Returning from Boar lane every 10 minutes from 8.40 a.m. till 10.30 p.m. Extra cars run on Saturdays only from Hunslet until 10.35 p.m. & from Boar lane up to 11 p.m. Sundays, from Boar lane every half-hour from 10.30 a.m, till 12 noon; then every 15 minutes till 10 p.m.; returning from Hunslet every half-hour from 10 a.m. till 11.30 a.m. then every 15 minutes till 9.30 p.m.

Kirkstall-Night Light, Blue-Leave Kirkstall, at 8.5 a.m. & every 10 minutes until 9.55 p.m. Returning from Boar lane every 10 minutes from 8.40 a.m. till 10.30 p.m. Extra cars run (Saturdays only) from Kirkstall until 10.25, returning up to 11 p.m. Sundays, every half-hour from Boar lane, from 10.30 a.m. till 12 noon; then every 15 minutes till 10 p.m; returning from Kirkstall every half-hour from 10 till 11.30 a.m. then every 15 minutes till 9.25 p.m.

Meanwood Road-Night Light, Red with White star-Tram cars leave bottom of Briggate 8.5 a.m. & every 10 minutes until 9.15 p.m. from Meanwood road (Junction inn) 8.25 a.m. & every 10 minutes until 8.55 p.m. Saturdays, extra journeys from Briggate until 10.55 p.m. & from Meanwood road until 10.35 p.m. No cars will run on this road on Sundays until further notice.

Upper Wortley-(Night Light, Blue. “The star”)— & Boar Lane-From Boar Lane, at 8.7 ½ a.m. & every half-hour until 9.37 ½ p.m. Saturdays, 10.7 ½ p.m. Upper Wortley (Night light, blue. “The star”), to Boar lane, 8.35 it 9.7 ½ a.m, & every hall-hour until 10.7 ½ p.m. Saturdays, 10.37 ½ p.m.

Yore Road-Night Light, Blue-Leaves corner of Duncan street, 8.45 a.m. & every 15 minutes until 10.30 p.m. Returning from York road, at 9 a.m. & every 15 minutes until 10.45 p.m. On Saturdays extra journeys from Duncan street until 11 p.m. & from York road 11.15 p.m. Sundays from corner of Dancan street, 10.30 a.m. & half-hourly Until 12, then every 15 minutes until 10 p.m. Returning from York road 10.45 a.m. & half-hourly until 12.15 noon, then every 15 minutes until 10.15 p.m.

RAILWAYS

Central Station, Wellington street.

Great Northern, William West, district supt.; William Towler, inspector; (goods office), R. Robinson, goods manager; (goods department), William Sloan, agent, Wellington street; (parcels office), 141 Briggate.

Lancashire & Yorkshire, Wm. Towler, inspector; (goods office), Wellington St. Charles Anthony Cleasley, agent.

London North Western, William Henry Swaine, station master; (goods department), George Greenish, district goods manager; Joseph Lodge, joint agent, Wellington street; (parcels office), 121 Briggate.

Midland, John Elliott, station master; George Carter, engineer; (gooda station), Junction street, Hunslet lane, Henry Coverdale, manager; (locomotive department), Nineveh road, Holbeck, J. J. Hanbury, superintendent.

North Eastern, Richd. Chamberlain, dist. Supt.; (goods), Marsh lane, Jonathan Rhodes Peniston, agent; (goods), Wellington street, William Steadman Leng, goods man, Benjamin Whiteley, goods agent; (locomotive department), 5 Wellington road, John Johnstone, engineer.

CARRIERS BY WATER

Aire & Calder Navigation (Trustees of), Dock street, to & from Hull & Goole to Wakefield, Huddersfield, Halifax & intermediate places in connection with steamers to London, Yarmouth. Newcastle & all continental ports; Marmaduke Storr Hodson, secretary & chief clerk.

France William, steamers (in connection with the Aire & Calder Navigation & Lancashire & Yorkshire Railways), convey goods three times weekly from Goole & Stanton’s wharf, Tooley street, London, every other day.

Leeds & Liverpool Canal Carrying Co. carriers between Leeds & Liverpool & intermediate places, daily (T. M. Hawkesworth. agent), office, Canal wharf, Water lane.

Wilson Fosbrooke & Co. (schooners convey goods three times a week to & from Hartley’s wharf, London), Aire & Calder wharf; & 11 Custom House buildings, Goole.

Kelly's Directory of the West Riding of Yorkshire (1881)

Surnames Found in Leeds

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Smith3,5941.52
2Walker2,0960.89
3Wilson1,9270.82
4Wood1,8920.80
5Taylor1,7070.72
6Brown1,6550.70
7Robinson1,5020.64
8Thompson1,3520.57
9Wright1,1630.49
10Johnson1,1430.48
11Harrison1,1210.47
12Jackson1,0850.46
13Atkinson1,0790.46
14Wilkinson9960.42
15Watson7930.34
16Shaw7920.34
17Holmes7860.33
18Clark7690.33
19Richardson7650.32
20Hall7570.32
21Barker7570.32
22Green7510.32
23Dixon7390.31
24Turner7360.31
25Hudson7050.30
26Ellis7030.30
27Ward6870.29
28Parker6850.29
29Foster6670.28
30Simpson6630.28
31Roberts6420.27
32Marshall6200.26
33Pearson6160.26
34Hodgson6030.26
35Lee5990.25
36Stead5910.25
37Booth5870.25
38White5780.24
39Rhodes5740.24
40Dawson5670.24
41Scott5500.23
42Mitchell5490.23
43Whitaker5430.23
44Webster5250.22
45Greenwood5210.22
46Schofield5210.22
47Brook5180.22
48Jones5100.22
49Hartley5090.22
50Sharp5030.21
51Gill5020.21
52Firth4910.21
53Briggs4860.21
54Naylor4860.21
55Bell4700.20
56Hirst4690.20
57Lister4610.20
58Hutchinson4590.19
59Armitage4530.19
60Sykes4480.19
61Nicholson4470.19
62Carter4350.18
63Hill4220.18
64Riley4160.18
65Chadwick4100.17
66Kelly3990.17
67Dobson3990.17
68Williamson3980.17
69Holdsworth3980.17
70Moore3960.17
71Cooper3940.17
72Hobson3910.17
73Myers3900.16
74Dickinson3880.16
75Whitehead3820.16
76Crowther3810.16
77Hargreaves3770.16
78Haigh3720.16
79Blackburn3710.16
80Fletcher3690.16
81Fawcett3680.16
82Chapman3590.15
83Ramsden3560.15
84Mason3510.15
85Walton3490.15
86Stephenson3450.15
87Wade3370.14
88Senior3340.14
89Dean3240.14
90Clarkson3190.13
91Carr3180.13
92Coates3130.13
93Newton3120.13
94Speight3110.13
95Williams3090.13
96Gibson3080.13
97Mann3070.13
98Moss3040.13
99Young3020.13
100Sutcliffe3010.13