Bridlington Genealogical Records

Bridlington Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Yorkshire Birth Index (1837-2010)

A growing index of births registered in the county. Records include a reference to the sub-registration district, making it easier to order the correct certificate.

FreeBMD Births (1837-1957)

An index to births registered at the central authority for England & Wales. The index provides the area where the birth was registered, mother's maiden name from September 1911 and a reference to order a birth certificate.

British Army Birth Index (1761-2005)

An index to births registered to British Army personal at home and abroad.

Birth Notices from The Times (1983-2003)

An index to over 100,000 birth and christening notices from The London Times.

Bridlington Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Yorkshire Marriage Index (1837-2011)

A growing index of marriages registered in the county. Records include a reference to the sub-registration district, making it easier to order the correct certificate.

UK Divorce Records (1858-1911)

Digital images of documents from civil divorce cases. The cases cover both the cause of the case and the outcome, such as division of property and visitation rights. These records also contain details of illegitimate children. Cases can be searched by a name index.

FreeBMD Marriages (1837-1961)

An index to marriages registered at the central authority for England & Wales. To March 1912 only the area of registration and name of one party is given. From then on, the spouse's surname is also given. Provides a reference, which can be used to order a marriage certificate with more details.

British Army Marriage Index (1796-2005)

An index to marriages registered for British Army personal at home and abroad.

Bridlington Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Yorkshire Death Index (1837-2010)

A growing index of deaths registered in the county. Records include a reference to the sub-registration district, making it easier to order the correct certificate.

Yorkshire Burial Transcripts (1441-1909)

Transcripts of Anglican burial registers from over 100 churches in Yorkshire.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

FreeBMD Deaths (1837-1964)

An index to deaths registered at the central authority for England and Wales. To 1866, only the locality the death was registered in was listed. Age was listed until 1969, when the deceased's date of birth was listed. Provides a reference to order a death certificate, which has further details.

Bridlington Church Records

West Yorkshire Confirmations (1859-1915)

Records recording teens and young adults commitment to the Christian faith.

England Parish Registers (1914-2013)

Documentation for those baptised, married and buried at England. Parish registers can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

England Parish Registers (1538-1934)

The primary source of documentation for baptisms, marriages and burials before 1837, though extremely useful to the present. Their records can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

Church Times (1863-Present)

An Anglican newspaper covering the affairs of the Church of England, national and international news.

Bridlington Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

North Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1673)

A name index to records recording taxes levied against owners of hearths in the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Yorkshire Lay Subsidy (1301)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by wapentake or liberty and settlement.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Bridlington Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Derbyshire Will Index (1858-1928)

An index to wills, proved by the Derby Probate Registry. Index includes name, residence and year of probate. Contains entries for Yorkshire, Cheshire, Lancashire, Staffordshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and other counties.

North Country Wills (1383-1558)

Transcripts of several hundred wills, contains an index to people named within.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (PPV) (1384-1858)

A index to testators whose will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. They principally cover those who lived in the lower two thirds of Britain, but contain wills for residents of Scotland, Ireland, British India and other countries. A copy of each will may be purchased for digital download.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (Subscription) (1384-1858)

An index and digital images of PCC wills, available on a subscription basis.

Newspapers Covering Bridlington

Yorkshire Evening Post (1890-1903)

This fully searchable newspaper will provide a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Yorkshire district. Includes family announcements.

Northern Echo (1870-1900)

Britain's most popular provincial newspaper, covering local & national news, family announcements, government & local proceedings and more.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer (1866-1953)

An illustrated, conservative newspaper with a national focus.

Yorkshire Gazette (1819-1913)

A regional newspaper including news from the Yorkshire district, business notices, family announcements, legal & governmental proceedings, advertisements and more.

Northern Star (1838-1852)

A chartist newspaper published in Leeds that focused on affairs in Northumberland, Yorkshire and Lancashire. The paper focuses on politics, but does contain a limited number of family announcements

Bridlington Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Bridlington Cemeteries

East Riding Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of East Riding's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Mausolea and Monuments (1500-Present)

Profiles of several hundred mausolea found in the British Isles.

Maritime Memorials (1588-1950)

Several thousand transcribed memorials remembering those connected with the nautical occupations.

Bridlington Directories & Gazetteers

Directory of the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire (1913)

A directory outlining the history of settlements in the North and East Ridings and listing their commercial, private and professional residents.

Kelly's Directory of N & E Ridings of Yorkshire (1913)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Post Office Directory, North and East Ridings (1857)

Historical, topographical and contemporary descriptions of settlements, suffixed with lists of businesses and residents.

White's Directory, East and North Ridings (1840)

A comprehensive gazetteer of cities, towns and townships; to which are appended lists of their residents, trades and occupations.

Directory of the North & East Ridings of Yorkshire (1921)

A directory of settlements in Westmorland detailing their history, agriculture, topography, economy and leading commercial, professional and private residents.

Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1486-1503)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

England & Wales Criminal Registers (1791-1892)

This collection lists brief details on 1.55 million criminal cases in England and Wales between 1791 and 1892. Its primary use is to locate specific legal records, which may give further details on the crime and the accused. Details may include the accused's age, nature of crime, location of trial and sentence. Early records can contain a place of birth.

Bridlington Taxation Records

North Riding of Yorkshire Hearth Tax (1673)

A name index to records recording taxes levied against owners of hearths in the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Lincolnshire Domesday & Lindsey Survey (1066-1118)

A transcription of the Lincolnshire section of the Domesday Book, which records land ownership, use and value in the late 11th century; and similar survey completed in 1118.

Yorkshire Lay Subsidy (1301)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by wapentake or liberty and settlement.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Bridlington Land & Property Records

East Riding Domesday Extracts (1066)

Extracts for East Riding settlements found in the Domesday book. Includes the modern & 11th century place name, land owners and details of later history.

Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1486-1503)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Yorkshire Domesday Records (1086)

An English translation of Yorkshire domesday records. This transcripts details the county's landowners in 1086.

Lincolnshire Domesday & Lindsey Survey (1066-1118)

A transcription of the Lincolnshire section of the Domesday Book, which records land ownership, use and value in the late 11th century; and similar survey completed in 1118.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Bridlington Occupation & Business Records

Collieries of The North (1869-1991)

Profiles of collieries in the north of England, with employment statistics, profiles of those who died in the mines and photographs.

Northern Mining Disasters (1705-1975)

Reports of mining distastes, includes lists of the deceased and photographs of monuments.

Smuggling on the East Coast (1600-1892)

An introduction to smuggling on the east coast of England, with details of the act in various regions.

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Yorkshire Rugby Union Commemoration Book (1914-1919)

A searchable book detailing the Yorkshire Rugby Football Union around the time of the Great War. Contains the names of many players and other persons associated with the sport.

Bridlington School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Bridlington

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Bridlington Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

East Riding Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of East Riding's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

The Visitation of Yorkshire: 1584-5 (1000-1585)

Pedigrees compiled from a late 16th century heraldic visitation of Yorkshire. This work records the lineage, descendants and marriages of families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

The Visitation of Yorkshire: 1612 (1000-1612)

Pedigrees compiled from a early 17th century heraldic visitation of Yorkshire. This work records the lineage, descendants and marriages of families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

Bridlington Military Records

15th Foot Regiment (East Riding) Historical Records (1685-1848)

A general history of the regiment, including biographies of its colonels.

North East War Memorials (1882-1951)

An inventory of memorials commemorating those who served and died in military conflicts.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Roll of Officers of the York and Lancaster Regiment (1756-1884)

Lists of officers by rank, regiment and name.

Officers of The Green Howards (1688-1931)

Biographies of hundreds of men who served as officers in The Green Howards, an infant regiment in the King's Division. Details given include parentage, date of birth, military career and later professional career.

Bridlington Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Alien Arrivals in England (1810-1869)

Details on over 600,000 non-British citizens arriving in England. Often includes age and professions. Useful for discerning the origin of immigrants.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Bridlington Histories & Books

History of the East and North Ridings (1840)

A general history of the area and its divisions.

East Riding Domesday Extracts (1066)

Extracts for East Riding settlements found in the Domesday book. Includes the modern & 11th century place name, land owners and details of later history.

Yorkshire Domesday Records (1086)

An English translation of Yorkshire domesday records. This transcripts details the county's landowners in 1086.

Victoria County History: Yorkshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Biographical Directories Covering Bridlington

Yorkshire Who's Who (1912)

A listing of the prominent residents of the county of Yorkshire, giving details on family, education, careers, hobbies, associations and more. Also includes details on the county's government officials, military officers, members of parliament, religious leaders and demographics.

Officers of The Green Howards (1688-1931)

Biographies of hundreds of men who served as officers in The Green Howards, an infant regiment in the King's Division. Details given include parentage, date of birth, military career and later professional career.

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Bridlington Maps

Maps of Yorkshire (1407-1922)

Digital images of maps covering the county.

Collery Maps of The North (1807-1951)

A number of maps of northern England with the locations of collieries plotted.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Bridlington Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Bridlington Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

Bridlington, which is about a mile from the sea, consists chiefly of one long street, extending along the southern declivity of a small elevation. Towards the north the country rises for more than a mile by a gentle ascent. At the west end of the town are fertile meadows and pasture grounds, and on the east is a small plain, extending to the sea.

At the east end of the town stood the priory, founded by Walter de Gaunt, in the early part of Henry I. The church of this priory, which remains, appears to have been a noble structure. It had two towers at the west end, and as the east end and the transepts are also destroyed, the remaining part, though considerable, is only a fragment of the ancient building. Of the walls and buttresses nothing remains except an arched gateway about 120 yards from the body of the building to the west. A large room above this has served as a town-hall, and the lower part as a prison.

Bridlington has a weekly market held on Saturday, and was formerly a considerable mart for corn. The number of houses are 849, and the inhabitants 3741. Bridlington Quay, to which genteel company resort for bathing, constitutes of itself a small town, and has a brisk and handsome appearance. The houses are in general well built, and the principal street that opens directly on the harbour, is remarkably broad. The northernmost pier having an agreeable platform, commanding a delightful view of Flamborough Head and the bay, is of course much frequented; and when the wind is unfavourable for doubling Flamborough Head, the former is often crowded with coasting vessels.

The Quay is undoubtedly an agreeable healthy place, where the resort in summer for sea-bathing is very considerable. The mineral springs here are reckoned efficacious for several diseases; and there are many attractions here for persons who have a taste for the peaceful and sequestered scenes of life, in preference to the gay and captivating charms of the more fashionable watering-places.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

BRIDLINGTON is a municipal borough, market, union and seaport town, head of a county court district and parish, 30 ¾ miles north from Hull, 22 ¾ south-east from Scarborough, 37 east-north-east from York by rail and 42 by road, 11 ¼ north-east from Driffield, 22 ½ north-north-east from Beverley and 208 from London, in the Buckrose division of the Riding, wapentake and petty sessional division of Dickering, rural deanery of Bridlington, archdeaconry of the East Riding and diocese of York. The town is situated on the Eastern coast of Yorkshire, and gives its name to the bay of which the promontory called Flamborough Head forms the northern extremity. To the north of Bridlington the face of the country is diversified with lofty hills, and the Wolds in some places extend to the coast, but at Bridlington the country sinks to a flat, which continues for 8 or 9 miles to the south, almost without variation. Bridlington is considered by some authorities to have been the site of a Roman station “Gubrantovicorum,” and many circumstances combine to prove its existence at or near this place: the vicinity of Flamborough Head, the Ocellum Promontorium, as a post for observation, the sheltered bay, the Sinus Poruosus of Ptolemy, the vestiges of a Roman road leading from York across the Wolds, in the direction of the villages of Sledmere and Rudston, are all circumstances which strengthen the supposition.

Bridlington was formerly governed by an Urban District Council of 15 members, formed under the “Local Government Act, 1894” (56 and 57 Viet. c. 73), in place of the Local Board established in 1863; it is now a municipal borough, constituted by a Charter of Incorporation granted July 14, 1899, and governed by a mayor, six aldermen and 18 councillors. The borough includes the whole of the present parishes of Bridlington and Hilderthorpe. That part of the borough formerly known as Bridlington Quay now forms its main portion, and the name “Bridlington Quay” has ceased to be used. For municipal purposes the borough is divided into three wards, viz.:-Bridlington, Quay and Hilderthorpe. The town is lighted by electricity, and supplied with water from works at Mount Pleasant.

The town comprises several good streets with excellent shops and numerous first-class lodging houses; the sea wall, 690 feet in length, extending from the Victoria rooms to the North Sands, was constructed in 1666-9, at a cost of about £20,000, by the Bridlington Local Board, under the direction of Mr. John Ashdown C.E. of London, to prevent the encroachment of the sea: about two acres of ground were reclaimed and formed into a handsome parade with ornamental terraces. Admission to the parade is obtained by payment of a small subscription and the funds derived therefrom are devoted to current expenses: in 1881, a sea wall, starting from Trinity cut and extending to Carr lane, a distance of 1,000 feet, was built at a cost of about £6,000, from plans by Messrs. Clark and Pickerill, engineers, and in 1887-8 another sea wall was added, commencing at the north end of Victoria terrace and extending to Trinity cut, a length of 870 feet, at a cost of about £10,400; this wall, which has a colonnade, was opened by H. R. H. the late Duke of Clarence K.G. in July, 1888.

During the season the town is resorted to by a large number of visitors. The N. E. Railway Company in 1912 constructed a new station with eight platforms.

In the town are hot and cold sea-water baths, and vapour and swimming baths; and the beach, formed of fine hard sand, is amply supplied with bathing machines and tents. About a quarter of a mile west of the quay is a chalybeate spring, procured in 1811 by boring to a depth of 43 feet, which was in much repute for its medicinal properties. It flows into a lake on the New Spa. The harbour was anciently inclosed by wooden piers, which gradually gave way to stonework. Several Acts of Parliament have been obtained from time to time for rebuilding and repairing it. In 1837 an Act was obtained for improving and rendering it more commodious and safe as a harbour of refuge, and it is now inclosed by two piers which extend a considerable distance into the sea. The whole of the south and a greater part of the north pier were built under the Act of 1837; the latter being completed in 1842 and the south pier in 1848, and the joint estimated cost amounted to £120,000: these piers afford an agreeable promenade and command extensive prospects, especially the northern one, from which are fine views of the bay and Flamborough Head; the north pier is 800 feet long and has a platform about eight yards broad, surmounted by a parapet: the south, pier is 1,500 feet long. The harbour, which is capable of holding 200 vessels of the usual tonnage of vessels frequenting this port, was improved in 1867 by an addition to the north pier, after plans by Sir John Coode C.E. at a contract cost of £6,000, and in 1885 it was deepened by 2 feet. This is the only harbour between Harwich and Leith open to vessels sailing northwards during northerly gales, which are the most prevalent and destructive winds on the eastern coast. The harbour, although a tidal one, is superior to all others on the east coast, inasmuch as the shelter afforded by Flamborough Head and the Smethwick Sands enables vessels to ride with safety in the bay until the tide flows for them to enter the harbour. A lifeboat was presented by the Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck, in 1824. In 1889 a lifeboat was placed here by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

The magnificent priory church of SS. Mary and Nicholas anciently belonged to the convent founded here in the reign of Henry I. for canons of the Order of St. Augustine, but of the original structure only the nave, portions of the lower stage of the towers and the western gatehouse of the precinct now remain, the Early English choir of five bays, the transepts, sacristy, treasury, a decagonal chapter house and cloisters, having entirely disappeared: the existing nave of eight bays with its aisles is Decorated on the north side, but later, and in part Perpendicular, on the south, and has a lofty clerestory lighted by large traceried windows, but there is no triforium, properly so called, although on the north side there is a passage over a blind arcading, and on the south a kind of gallery, constructed in front of that part of the clerestory windows which is below the transom; the east end, which terminates at the ancient crossing, has a memorial window, 39 feet 6 in. in height, erected in 1849 by T. G. Clayton esq. of Bessingby, to his wife and son: the chancel is formed by inclosing three bays of the a reading with screens of oak; it is paved with black and white marble and is fitted with carved oak stalls, four new stalls, by Elwell, of Beverley, being added in 1903: the communion rails are of Italian walnut, massively wrought, and have brass gates: within the sacrarium lies an ancient altar slab, bearing five incised crosses: the communion table was presented in 1857 by the late Rev. Y. G. Lloyd-Greame M.A. and the chairs in 1851 by Miss Coverley and Yarburgh Greame esq.: the reading desk of oak was given by Mrs. Clayton in 1857, and the pulpit of oak by John Rickaby esq. in 1860: the brass lectern was presented in 1873 by C. Edward Lamplugh esq. F.R.G.S. of London: the font of Derbyshire marble, plain and massive, is a work of the Early Decorated period: all the windows in the north aisle are filled with modern glass of fine quality, illustrative of Old Testament history, in the style of the 16th century: in the south aisle is a memorial window, erected in 1857, to Yarburgh Yarburgh esq. of Sewerby House, who died 26th January, 1856, by his niece, Miss Lloyd, and another stained window placed in 1870 by J. H. Kemplay esq. of Bridlington; the great Perpendicular west window, 55 feet in height with a width of 29 feet below the transom and 31 above, is filled with modern stained glass, illustrating the Passion of Our Lord, and exhibiting figures of the evangelists and various saints: near the entrance is an ancient sculptured stone, representing some allegorical subject, with an inscription and the date 1587 on the reverse side: in the north aisle, preserved in wooden desks, are several ancient books, and at the east end of this aisle there remains an Easter sepulchre: in the south aisle, near the entrance, is a curious coffin slab: on the south side of the present chancel stands an alms box, supported on a stone pillar.

The restoration of the church was begun in 1846 and continued to 1857, under the direction of the late Edmund Sharpe esq. M.A. and E. G. Paley esq. architects, when the roof was raised and partially renewed, the west window thoroughly repaired and filled with the existing glass, and the interior cleaned and renovated; the galleries were also removed, and the whole area of the nave reseated: in 1875 a handsome reredoe of Caen stone was erected, and the restoration of the entire west front was begun in the summer of 1876, under the direction of the late Sir G. Gilbert Scott B.A.: the north porch, an Early English work with graceful details, and the north-west tower, also Early English with a Decorated upper storey, being restored by the late Rev. Y. G. Lloyd-Greame M.A. at a cost of £3,000; this tower has a plain fiat-topped parapet, supported on machicolations between the buttresses and surrounded with an treading, and contains a peal of 8 belle, cast by Messrs. Taylor, of Loughborough, and given in 1902 by W. B. Jameson esq.: the south-west tower, which has been almost entirely rebuilt, is an elegant structure in the Perpendicular style with double buttresses at the angles, gabled and crocketed, and rising into tall octagonal spired pinnacles, enriched with cricketed gablets and finished with vanes; the upper stage is panelled and lighted by large ogee windows; the parapet is embattled and relieved by four spirelets; the tower contains a clock with two dials; the total cost of this restoration was £21,703: the organ was presented in 1834 by Robert Lowry esq. of Bridlington, but has since been altered and enlarged, and in 1892 a new organ was placed at a cost of £1,000, subscribed by the parishioners. In 1900 new stalls of carved oak, executed by Messrs. Elwell and Son, of Beverley, were erected in the choir for the use of the clergy. The length of the present church in the interior is 185 feet, and the distance from the farthest pillar of the east wall of the church (the foundation of which has been taken up) is 125 feet, so that the ancient church seems to have been nearly of the same length as Beverley Minster-about 333 feet; its breadth is 68 feet and its height about 70 feet: there are several monuments and inscriptions in the church, including in the wall of the south aisle a handsome canopied recess of alabaster with life-size bust in white marble of the Rev. R. P. Blakeney M.A. late vicar, who died 31st December, 1884: there are 1,000 sittings. The register dates from the year 1564. The living is a rectory, net yearly value £350, including 66 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of the trustees of the late Rev. Charles Simeon, and held since 1896 by the Rev. James Allan Pride D.C.L., LL.D. of the University of Toronto and M.A., LL.B. of the University of London, who is also vicar of Bessingby, and surrogate.

Christ Church is an ecclesiastical parish, formed out of Bridlington parish 30 Sept. 1841, and extended November 29, 1870. The church, in the Quay road, erected in 1840-1, on a site given by John Ricaby esq. at a cost of £2,300, from designs by Messrs. Scott and Moffatt, architects, is a building of stone in the Early English style, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, transepts and a tower with spire containing a clock and 8 tubular bells, provided in 1901: the church was enlarged in 1852, when the spire was built, and restored and re-seated in 1866, at a cost of between £600 and £700: the church will seat about 700 persons. The register dates from the year 1841. The living is a vicarage, with Hilderthorpe annexed, net yearly value £250, including 11 ½ acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of the rector of Bridlington, and held since 1908 by the Rev. Gilbert Leny James, of St. Aidan’s.

Christ Church Parish Hall, erected in 1911, at a cost of £2,000, will seat 500 persons.

The Wycliffe Church Room was built in 1884, at a cost of £600, and contains 200 sittings.

Holy Trinity is an ecclesiastical parish, formed 20th Jan. 1874, out of Bridlington, and Christ Church, Bridlington Quay and Sewerby parishes. The church, in the Promenade, erected in 1871, at a cost of £6,500, is a building of stone in the Transitional style from Early English to Decorated, from designs of Messrs. Smith and Brodrick, architects, of Hull, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles and a tower with spire, containing 3 bells, presented by the late Rev. Yarburgh Gamaliel Lloyd-Greame M.A. of Sewerby House, who also contributed largely towards the erection of the church: at the east end of the south aisle is a stained window, erected by the Rev. Charles Forster M.A. incumbent 1874-80, at a cost of £160: there are 900 sittings. The register date from the year 1874. The living is a consolidated chapelry, having an endowment of £80 yearly, net yearly value £400, with residence, in the gift of the Archbishop of York, and held since 1884 by the Rev. William George Halse M.A. of St. John’s College, Cambridge. The vicar’s income, beyond the above-mentioned endowment, is dependent upon the offertories. A new vicarage house and a parish room were built in 1893 at a cost of about £2,000.

The Catholic church of Our Lady and St. Peter, in Victoria road, erected in 1894, is an edifice of brick with stone dressings, in the Early Gothic style, consisting of apsidal chancel, nave with clerestory, north and south aisles, and with side chapels, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin and the Sacred Heart: the sanctuary is divided from the nave by a lofty arch resting on clustered shafts of polished Derbyshire marble and capitals richly carved: a new altar of Gothic design, given by Mrs. Jane Kitnmings, was erected in Dec 1906: there are 300 sittings.

Trinity Congregational chapel, on the Promenade, erected in 1878, and enlarged in 1879, is a structure of red brick, with dressings of stone and white brick, in the Italian style; it was renovated and reseated in 1911, and will seat over 730 persons.

Zion Congregational chapel, in St. John street, was founded in 1662; the present chapel, erected in 1907 at a cost of £1,600, from plans by Mr. Jos. Shepherdson, architect, of Bridlington, is of brick with stone dressings, and will seat 230 persons: the old chapel, built in 1705, has been pulled down. The Baptist chapel, Quay road, first erected here in 1698, was entirely rebuilt in 1874, and is an edifice of white brick, with stone and red brick dressings, in the Gothic style, consisting of nave and aisles and a tower 150 feet in height: there are sittings for 500 persons. The Wesleyan chapel, in Chapel street, built in 1873 on the site of an older chapel erected in 1770, at a cost of £5,500, is an edifice of white brick with a stone front, in the Italian style, relieved by columns of the Corinthian order, and has nearly 1,100 sittings, 100 of which are free. The Wesleyan chapel, in St. John street, originally built at the beginning of the present century, was rebuilt on an approximate site in 1883-4, at a coat of £4,400, and is of white brick in the Italian style, from designs by Mr. Joseph Earnshaw, architect, and has sittings for 650 persons. The United Methodist chapel, in the Promenade, erected in 1872, at a cost of about £3,000, is an edifice of brick with a stuccoed front, and has sittings for 500 persons. The Primitive Methodist chapel, also in St. John street, was erected in 1877, and has 600 sittings. The Primitive Methodist chapel, in Chapel street, an edifice in the Italian style, was erected in 1880 on the site of a previous building, at a cost, including ground, of £3,040, and will seat 800 persons. The Salvation Army occupies a building in Wellington road, erected in 1876-7 by the Albert Temperance Society, and holding 600 persons.

The Cemetery, on the Cemetery road, comprising an area of 8 acres, with mortuary chapels, was formed in 1875, at a cost of £13,000; it was extended in 1905 by the addition of 7 ½ acres, and is now under the control of the Corporation.

The yearly value of the charities, exclusive of £80 for the Grammar and Knitting schools, is £323.

Of the domestic buildings of the priory there are now no remains, with the exception of portions of some columns of a vaulted chamber beneath the priors lodge, which adjoined the church on the south-west: the foundations of the south transept have been traced and outlined in stone; the cloisters extended south of the nave, and had the dormitory on the east and the refectory on the south side: the cemetery was, and still is, on the north side, and contains the grave of 40 mariners, who perished in Bridlington Bay during a great storm on Feb. 10, 1871, over which an obelisk of grey stone, suitably inscribed, has been placed.

The ancient close of the monastery, to the west and south-west of the church, and now called “The Church Green,” has been laid out with grass plots and shrubberies and fenced in, access being gained by turnstiles, over each of which is a globular lamp, supported on iron standards; an avenue of trees leads from the Bayle-gate to the western entrance of the church.

The ancient gate-house of the priory, situated a little to the south-west of the church, and now called “Bayle-gate,” was erected in 1388, and has part of the guesthouse near it; the gateway is groined, and the room over it, in which the prior formerly held his courts, is now used only by the feoffees of the lords of the manor for their meetings.

The Police station, an edifice of buff brick with red brick dressings, on the Quay road, was built in 1881, at a cost of £4,000, and consists of court house, magistrates' room and a residence for the superintendent, and six constables.

The Priory Church Institute, in St. John street, erected in 1894, contains a gymnasium, and also a large room let for holding meetings and accommodating about 600 persons.

The trade of the town is principally retail.

The market for corn is held at the Black Lion Hotel, in High street, on Saturdays. Markets for butter, eggs, poultry, fruit &c. are held in King street. Prince street and the Market place every Saturday during the year, and a sub-market on Wednesdays. Fairs for cattle, horses and sheep are held on the Monday before Whit-Sunday and on the 21st of October. A statute fair for the hiring of servants is held on the Tuesday nearest the 14th of November.

The Bridlington Agricultural Society, established in 1835, holds a show annually in the month of July or August.

On the point of Midway green, at the junction of Station and Quay roads, is a drinking fountain, erected by his friends and fellow townsmen, in memory of Humphry Sandwith M.D. a native of this town, who died at Paris, in 1881.

Bridlington has several good hotels, the “Alexandra,” “Britannia,’’ “Station,” “Bridlington Hydro,” “Brunswick” and the “Londesborough,” besides private hotels and boarding houses.

The Victoria Rooms, erected in 1848 by a private company at a cost of about £8,000, are now the property of the Corporation, and have since been enlarged at a cost of about £2,000, and are in the Tudor style, with an embattled tower, and entrances from Garrison street and the north pier.

The Prince’s parade, which is tastefully laid out as pleasure grounds and a promenade, has a band stand, erected in 1904 at a cost of over £700; new lavatories and shelters for 2,000 people have also been provided at a total cost of £4,000. The parade has been extended northwards, at a total cost of £24,000.

The Spa and Gardens, opened August, 1896, occupy five acres to the south of the harbour, and are protected by a sea wall, and laid out with grassy slopes, flower beds and walks, with a lake, adjoining which is an opera house, a band stand, winter gardens and refreshment rooms. The property is now owned by the New Spa and Gardens Co. Limited. First-class instrumental and vocal concerts are given daily during the season.

The Sailors’ Institute, Cliff street, established in 1865, consists of reading, library, billiard and class rooms.

The Yorkshire Foresters’ Orphanage and Convalescent Home is situated in St. John's avenue south, and was opened in 1899. The building is available for 20 men, 10 women and 10 orphans.

The Bridlington Recreation Club have space for over 20 lawn tennis courts, cricket, also a crown bowling green.

The Yorkshire Yacht Club building in Marine drive, erected in 1898, is a structure in the Old English style, and contains reading, smoking and billiard rooms, and also bedrooms. There are about 200 members.

A small iron drinking fountain originally placed opposite Holy Trinity church, by H. S. Blundell esq. in 1881, was removed in 1902 to the Beaconsfield lawn, and in the same year a larger fountain, surmounted by a lamp, was erected in its place by the Corporation.

At the north end of St. John street is a memorial bust to the late Alderman John Sawdon, three times mayor of Bridlington: the bust which surmounts a marble fountain, was unveiled in 1912 by Sir Alexander Macdonald, of the Isles.

The Lloyd Hospital, on the Quay road, was erected in 1876, at a cost of £2,000, chiefly contributed by the late Rev. Y. G. Lloyd-Greame M.A. and is a building of red brick with stone facings, from designs by Messrs. Smith and Brodrick, architects, of Hull; a new wing was added in 1894 at a cost of £750, and the hospital now contains 22 beds and is supported by voluntary contributions.

St. Anne’s Convalescent Home, on the Flamborough road, erected in 1878-9, at a cost of about £15,000, is a structure of red brick with stone dressings, in the Gothic style; the south front is gabled, and the building has an extreme length of about 150 feet. The Home is intended for the reception of patients of small means, and will hold about 200, exclusive of staffs It is supported by voluntary contributions.

St. Anne’s church, originally built in 1869 as an iron structure, was taken down in 1888, and a substantial church of brick erected adjoining the Home, to which it belongs: a chancel was added in 1909. It is served by chaplains licensed by the Archbishop of York.

Bridlington Municipal Sanatorium was erected in 1903-4 at a cost, including site, of £4,900, and will hold 18 patients; plans of extension are now (February, 1913) before the Council.

In 1653, during the differences between King Charles and his Parliament, this place became the scene of hostilities. The Queen, Henrietta Maria, who was bringing a supply of arms and ammunition from Holland, under the convoy of Admiral van Tromp, arrived in the bay, having narrowly escaped the squadron under the command of Admiral Batten, who had been stationed to intercept her: after her landing Batten entered the bay with two of his ships, and for some hours the town was subjected to his cannonading; he was then obliged to put to sea, as the ebb of the tide would have left him in shoal water: some of the shots penetrated the house in which the Queen was, and compelled her, with the Duchess of Richmond and other ladies of her retinue, at a very unseasonable hour, to seek for safety beneath the precipitous bank of the stream which empties itself into the harbour. The Queen remained at Bridlington nearly a fortnight and then departed for York. A hostile squadron, under the command of Commodore John Paul Jones, U.S.N. visited Bridlington on the 20th September, 1779, soon after his descent upon Whitehaven, to capture some vessels under convoy of the “Serapis” and the “Countess of Scarborough;” on the following night, by moonlight, an action commenced so near to Flamborough Head (which was crowded with spectators) that some of the balls grazed the cliffs; the action, which was very sanguinary, lasted several hours, when the convoy vessels struck, and Paul Jones reached the Texel safely with his prizes.

Roman coins have been found at Bridlington, and in the parish of Rudston the remains of a Roman villa have been discovered, as well as a Roman pottery and tesse-lated pavement. Weapons and instruments of various kinds, made of chipped flint, have been met with in the whole surrounding district; these include arrow heads, with ethers of similar form but of larger size, probably serving as small spears or javelins. Large and very interesting collections of these implements were made by the late Mr. Edward Tindall and the late Mr. Thomas Cape, of Bridlington, and Mr. Robert Gatenby has also a fine collection.

The manorial rights of the manor of Bridlington passed by a grant from King James the First in 1624 to John Ramsay, 1st Earl of Holderness, his heirs and assigns-for ever; and by subsequent deeds the manor is now vested in the freeholders of Bridlington. There are 13 lords and 12 assistants, chosen by the freeholders, and when the lords are reduced to six in number, seven others are chosen from the assistants. The chief lord is elected annually, on the 2nd of February, and a manor court is held twice yearly in the Old Town hall, in February and November.

The parish consists of the townships of Bridlington, Hilderthorpe, Buckton, the townships and chapelry of Sewerby-cum-Marton and Grindall, the chapelry of Speeton and the hamlet of Easton. The area is 2,749 acres of land, 3 of water and 48 of foreshore; assessable value, £78,157; the population in 1911 was 11,281 for Bridlington parish, including 7 officers and 78 inmates in the workhouse.

The area of the borough is 2,751 acres; rateable value, £96,191; the population in 1911 was 14,334, viz:-Bridlington, 11,281, and Hilderthorpe, 3,053.

The population of the municipal wards in 1911 was:-Bridlington, 4,951; Hilderthorpe, 4,552; Quay, 4,831.

The population of the ecclesiastical parishes in 1911 was:-St. Mary (parish church), 5,422; Christ Church, 6,778; Holy Trinity, 2,064.

Petty Sessions are held at the Court House, Quay road, every Saturday at 10 a.m. & at the Police Court, Filey, every Friday at 10.30 a.m.

The following places are included in the Petty Sessional Division:-Argam, Auburn, Barmston, Bempton, Bessingby, Boynton, Boythorpe, Bridlington, Buckton, Burton Agnes, Butterwick, Carnaby, Easton Filey, Flamborough, Flixton, Folkton, Fordon, Foxholes, Fraisthorpe, Gransmoor, Grindale, Haisthorpe, Hilderthorpe & Wilsthorpe, Humanby, Little Kelt, Lissett, Muston, North Burton, Reighton, Rudston, Sewerby-cum-Marton, Speeton, Thornholme, Thwing & Octon, Ulrome & Wold Newton.

TERRITORIAL FORCE.

5th Battalion Alexandra Princess of Wales Own (Yorkshire Regiment) (B Co.), Swindon street; Capt. J. B. Purvis; Sergt. John William Webster, drill instructor 5th Battalion (Cyclists) East Yorkshire Regiment (G Co.); Color-Sergt. A. Hawkswood, drill instructor.

BRIDLINGTON UNION

The union comprises 30 townships and parishes, viz.:-Argam, Barmston, Bempton & Newsholme, Bessingby, Boynton, Bridlington, Buckton, Burton Agnes, Carnaby, Dringhoe, Upton & Brough, Easton, Flamborough, Fordon, Fraisthorpe with Auburn & Wilsthorpe, Gransmoor, Grindale, Haisthorpe, Hilderihorpe, Hunmanby, Lissett, North Burton, Reighton, Rudston, Sewerby-cum-Marton, Skipsea, Speeton, Thornholm, Thwing, Ulrome & Wold Newton. The area is 66,418 acres; rateable value at Michaelmas, 1912, £173,098; the population in 1911 was 22,077.

Board day, every alternate Saturday, at the Workhouse at 1 p.m.

The Union Workhouse is a brick building, on the north side of the town & on the Flamborough road; it was erected in 1846, at a cost of about £5,000, & is available for about 150 persons: the average number of inmates is 60.

PLACES OF WORSHIP with times of Services.

St. Mary’s, Priory Church, Rev. James Allan Pride D.C.L., LL.D. rector; Rev. Sidney Metcalfe M.A. curate; 8 & 11 a.m. & 3 & 7 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

Christ Church, Quay road, Rev. Gilbert Leny James, vicar; Rev. Oscar Reginald Plant, curate; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.; holy communion, 8 a.m.

Emmanuel Church, Hilderthorpe, Rev. Gilbert Leny James, vicar; Rev. Oscar Reginald Plant, curate; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.

Holy Trinity Church, Promenade, Rev. William George Halse M.A. vicar; Rev. Courtenay Francis Thomas Parsons L.Th. curate; summer months, 8 & 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.; winter months, 8 & 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.; saints’ days, 12 a.m.; Wed. 7.30 p.m.

Catholic Church, Our Lady & St. Peter, Victoria road. Rev. Vincent Octavius Calvert, rector; Sun. 8.30 & 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; daily, 7.30 a.m. & Tue. & Thur. 7.30 p.m.; holidays, 8 & 10 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

Baptist, Quay road, Rev. William Slater; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7.45 p.m.

Congregational (Trinity), Promenade, Rev. John Edward Evans B.A.; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7.30 p.m.

Congregational (Zion), St. John’s street, Rev. Alfred Glading; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Tue. 7.30 p.m.

Primitive Methodist, St. John’s street. Rev. William Turner (supt.) & Rev. George Tucker; Rev. Henry Woodcock; Rev. Robert Harrison; Rev. Frederick E. Heape & Rev. Thomas A. McCready, supernumeraries; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.; Chapel street, Wed. 7.30 p.m.

United Methodist, Promenade, Rev. W. Conrad Balmer; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 8 p.m.

Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel street; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Mon. 7 p.m.

Wesleyan Methodist, St. John’s street; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

Sailors’ Bethel, South cliff; 2.30 & 7 p.m.; Tue. & Fri. 7.30 p.m.

Salvation Army Barracks, Wellington road.

SCHOOLS

The Grammar School. The date of the foundation of this school is unknown: in the reign of Henry VI. there was, attached to the Priory, a school to which the origin of the Grammar school can be probably ascribed. Two hundred years later, in 1636, Mr. W. Hustler, an inhabitant of Bridlington, charged his estates in the North Riding with the annual payment of £40 in favour of the Grammar school, & this still forms part of the endowment. In 1894 the present school was re-established under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners whereby various charitable funds were made available for new school buildings. The East Riding County Council, the Bridlington Borough Council & the Lords Feoffees of the manor of Bridlington also gave substantial help. The school is excellently situated on rising ground immediately outside the town, on the Bessingby road, & stands in its own grounds of 30 acres, which are laid out for cricket, football & golf. The first portion of the buildings was completed in Aug. 1899, & additions were made in 1902 & 1912; the total cost, including equipment, was over £40,000. The main block comprises; large school hall, eight class rooms, cloak rooms, lavatories, dining hall, eight dormitories, boarders’ common rooms & studies, reading rooms, seven bath rooms, rooms for five assistant masters & complete hospital wards for non-infectious cases: for infectious cases there is a sanatorium at the other side of the grounds. The head master’s house adjoins the boarding house. For science & art teaching there is a separate block of six rooms, including chemical & physical laboratories & two art rooms. Other buildings include a gymnasium, cricket pavilion, carpenter’s shop, bicycle sheds, photographic dark room, armoury & miniature rifle range. The average number of boys is 150, of whom more than one third are boarders. The school is controlled by a body of governors, Thomas Harland esq. J.P. chairman.

The High School for Girls, in St. John’s street, was established in 1905, & is partly maintained by the East Riding County Council & the Bridlington Corporation. The buildings, which are of brick & stone, were erected in 1910 at a cost of about £8,500, & stand in 6 acres of ground, including a kitchen garden. The buildings comprise an assembly hall, class rooms, laboratory, art room, lecture rooms &c. There is a large house on the sea front for the use of boarders.

The Education Authority consists of 15 members, 12 being members of the Council & 3 (one a lady) being co-opted.

Burlington Schools, Marton road (mixed & infants), erected in 1910, for 500 mixed & 200 infants; average attendance, 350 mixed & 160 infants.

New Central Council School, Oxford street, erected in 1902, for 810 mixed & 250 infants; average attendance, 725 mixed, 200 infants.

West street, Hilderthorpe (boys & infants), erected in 1881 for 300 boys & 200 infants; average attendance, 160 boys & 120 infants.

Wesleyan, Princess street junior mixed), erected in 1840 & since enlarged, for 166 children; average attendance, 140.

Kelly's Directory of the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire (1913)

Surnames Found in Bridlington

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Smith1551.75
2Wilson1311.48
3Brown1271.44
4Dixon1061.20
5Robinson971.10
6Taylor921.04
7Harrison881.00
8Jackson790.89
9Watson710.80
10Gray710.80
11Stephenson650.74
12Morris640.72
13Robson640.72
14Thompson630.71
15Williamson630.71
16Crawford560.63
17Simpson540.61
18Atkinson540.61
19Bell500.57
20Richardson450.51
21Coates440.50
22Nicholson430.49
23Foster410.46
24Clark400.45
25Young390.44
26Pickering390.44
27Dobson380.43
28Walkington370.42
29Moore360.41
30Anderson360.41
31Pearson360.41
32Sawden360.41
33Walker350.40
34Carter350.40
35Hodgson350.40
36Elliott340.38
37Sanderson320.36
38Milner320.36
39Atkin320.36
40Miles310.35
41Kirby310.35
42Knaggs310.35
43Wright300.34
44Shaw300.34
45Hall290.33
46Ward280.32
47Martin270.31
48Chapman270.31
49Barker270.31
50Frankish270.31
51Clarke260.29
52Pinder260.29
53Wardill260.29
54Gibson250.28
55Bishop250.28
56Beckett250.28
57Wiles250.28
58Mainprize250.28
59Marshall240.27
60Coulson240.27
61Langton240.27
62Wilkinson230.26
63Hutchinson230.26
64Cope230.26
65Nettleton230.26
66Allerston230.26
67Dunn220.25
68Lyon220.25
69Sampson220.25
70Mason210.24
71Deighton210.24
72Pinkney210.24
73Heselton210.24
74Johnson200.23
75Rhodes200.23
76Nichols200.23
77Baron200.23
78Scrivener200.23
79Edmond200.23
80Jarratt200.23
81Sunley200.23
82Sawdon200.23
83Lamplugh200.23
84Baker190.22
85Hudson190.22
86Barnett190.22
87Forbes190.22
88Armitage190.22
89Chew190.22
90Coatham190.22
91Woodcock180.20
92Allison180.20
93Constable180.20
94Turner170.19
95King170.19
96Lee170.19
97Freeman170.19
98Potter170.19
99Dalby170.19
100Hird170.19