Wolverhampton Genealogical Records

Wolverhampton Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Staffordshire Birth Index (1837-2007)

A growing index of births registered in the county. Records include a reference to the sub-registration district, making it easier to order the correct certificate.

Staffordshire Baptism Transcripts (1538-1812)

Covering around 70 Staffordshire parishes, these records provide proof of parentage and often list abodes and occupations.

FreeBMD Births (1837-1957)

An index to births registered at the central authority for England & Wales. The index provides the area where the birth was registered, mother's maiden name from September 1911 and a reference to order a birth certificate.

British Army Birth Index (1761-2005)

An index to births registered to British Army personal at home and abroad.

Wolverhampton Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Wolverhampton Marriage Records (1660-1776)

A searchable database containing a transcription of the marriage registers of Wolverhampton. These records may help trace a family as far back as 1660.

Staffordshire Marriage Index (1837-2013)

A growing index of marriages registered in the county. Records include a reference to the sub-registration district, making it easier to order the correct certificate.

Vicar General’s Office Marriage Licences (1600-1679)

Abstracts of marriage licences granted by the Vicar-General in London. These licences could be used to marry in any church in the Province of Canterbury.

Staffordshire Marriage Transcripts (1538-1839)

Covering around 70 Staffordshire parishes, these records document marriages and often provide the parties' residence.

Wolverhampton Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St John, Wolverhampton Burial Records (1680-1837)

Burial records covering those buried at St John, Wolverhampton_. This resource is an index and may not include all the details that were recorded in the burial registers from which they were extracted.

St George, Wolverhampton Burial Records (1608-1873)

An index of burials recorded at St George, Wolverhampton_. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of burial, age (where available) and occasionally other notes.

St Peter, Wolverhampton Burial Records (1539-1935)

An index of burials recorded at St Peter, Wolverhampton_. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of burial, age (where available) and occasionally other notes.

Temple Street Independent, Wolverhampton Burials (1784-1799)

An index to burials recorded in the registers of a Catholic church. The index contains the name of the deceased, the date of their burial and their age where available.

Wolverhampton Church Records

Wolverhampton Parish Registers (1833-1941)

Prior to civil registration in 1837, the parish registers of Wolverhampton are the most common place to turn for details on births, marriages and deaths.

Lichfield Diocese Parish Clerk Nomiations (1691-1916)

An index to surviving nominations of parish clerks. The index may contain: parish, surname, forename, year, the reason for the appointment (e.g. death, ill-health, retirement or dismissal of predecessor), and occasionally further information, such as occupation or age.

Staffordshire Parish Registers (1860-1936)

The parish registers of Staffordshire are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths. Their records can assist tracing a family as far back as 1860.

Staffordshire Past Track (1300-Present)

A searchable collection of documents, photographs, paintings and other images relating to the county of Staffordshire.

Staffordshire Church Photographs (1905-2003)

Mostly modern photographs of churches of all denominations in Staffordshire.

Wolverhampton Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Staffordshire Lay Subsidy (1332-1333)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by hundred and settlement.

Staffordshire Lay Subsidy (1327)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by hundred and settlement.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Wolverhampton Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Lichfield and Coventry Diocese Probate Index (1650-1760)

An index to wills, administrations and inventories proved by the Diocese of Lichfield and Coventry. Copies of wills can be ordered or viewed at the record office in Lichfield.

Lichfield Diocese Probate & Administration Index (1516-1652)

A searchable database providing brief details of surviving probates and administrations granted by the Diocese of Lichfield, which covered parts of Derbyshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Warwickshire. Contains a reference to order the original documents.

Derbyshire Will Index (1858-1928)

An index to wills, proved by the Derby Probate Registry. Index includes name, residence and year of probate. Contains entries for Yorkshire, Cheshire, Lancashire, Staffordshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and other counties.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1649-1660)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Newspapers Covering Wolverhampton

Lichfield Mercury (1883-1965)

This fully searchable newspaper will provide a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Lichfield district. Includes family announcements.

Birmingham Daily Gazette (1865-1889)

News, family announcements etc. from Birmingham, Warwickshire & Staffordshire.

Birmingham Daily Post (1857-1900)

A searchable newspaper providing a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Birmingham district. Includes obituaries and family announcements.

Birmingham Journal (1837-1869)

Original images of a local newspaper, searchable via a full text index. Includes news from the Birmingham area, business notices, obituaries, family announcements and more.

Birmingham Gazette (1741-1871)

A local newspaper including news from the Birmingham district, business notices, family announcements, legal & governmental proceedings, advertisements and more.

Wolverhampton Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Wolverhampton Cemeteries

Staffordshire Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Staffordshire's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Mausolea and Monuments (1500-Present)

Profiles of several hundred mausolea found in the British Isles.

Maritime Memorials (1588-1950)

Several thousand transcribed memorials remembering those connected with the nautical occupations.

Wolverhampton Directories & Gazetteers

Wolverhampton Red Book  (1892-1941)

An almanac and directory of businesses and private residents in the Wolverhampton area.

Steven's Directory of Wolverhampton (1879)

A directory of the district of Wolverhampton. For each area, there is a list of private residents and of traders.

Manufacturing District Classified Directory (1853)

Classified directory of the manufacturing district fifteen miles around Birmingham, including Worcester & the Potteries. Does not include Birmingham.

Bridgen's Directory of Wolverhampton Borough (1833)

A directory of traders; with sections on local institutions, bankers, conveyances and ironmasters.

Wolverhampton Red Book & Directory (1914)

A description of the town, its churches, environs; supplemented with a directory of the trades and private residents.

Staffordshire Feet of Fines (1327-1547)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Staffordshire Feet of Fines (1216-1272)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Stafford Gaol Photograph Albums (1877-1916)

An name index to photographs of prisoners in Stafford Gaol photo albums.

Staffordshire Poor Law Admissions & Discharges (1836-1900)

An index to comings and going in Staffordshire's civil workhouses. The index contains: name, age or year of birth, occupation and original parish.

Staffordshire Quarter Sessions Jurors Lists Index (1811-1831)

An index to names occurring in quarter sessions' juror lists.

Wolverhampton Taxation Records

Staffordshire Lay Subsidy (1332-1333)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by hundred and settlement.

Staffordshire Lay Subsidy (1327)

A tax on the county's wealthier residents, ordered by hundred and settlement.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Red Book of the Exchequer (1066-1230)

A compilation of records from the Court of the Exchequer primarily dealing with taxes and land. These records are in Latin.

Wolverhampton Land & Property Records

Staffordshire Feet of Fines (1327-1547)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Staffordshire Feet of Fines (1216-1272)

Abstracts of records that detail land conveyances.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem (1236-1291)

Abstracts of records detailing the estates and families of deceased tenants from the reigns of Henry III and Edward I.

Wolverhampton Occupation & Business Records

Staffordshire Past Track (1300-Present)

A searchable collection of documents, photographs, paintings and other images relating to the county of Staffordshire.

Staffordshire Police Force Registers (1842-1920)

An index to records detailing every member of Staffordshire's police force. Original records contain many details, such as physical description, age, date of birth, previous occupations and career.

Staffordshire Apprenticeship Records (1600-1900)

An index to a variety of records, particularly apprenticeship indentures issued by parish guardians. The index contains details on age, parish, occupation and master. Original documents will contain further details such as the name of the apprentice's father or guardian.

Staffordshire Photographers (1861-1940)

A directory of commercial photographers in Staffordshire.

Midlands Mines Index (1896)

Profiles of coal and metal mines in the Midlands region of England.

Wolverhampton School & Education Records

Staffordshire Past Track (1300-Present)

A searchable collection of documents, photographs, paintings and other images relating to the county of Staffordshire.

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Wolverhampton

Victoria County History: Staffordshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Wolverhampton Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

Victoria County History: Staffordshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Staffordshire Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Staffordshire's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Wolverhampton Military Records

South Staffordshire Home Guard (1940-1944)

A detailed history of the home guard during World War II.

Staffordshire Past Track (1300-Present)

A searchable collection of documents, photographs, paintings and other images relating to the county of Staffordshire.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls (1914-1920)

Index and original images of over 5 million medal index cards for British soldiers It can be searched by individual's name, Coprs, Unit and Regiment. Due to the loss of many WWI service records, this is the most complete source for British WWI soldiers

Wolverhampton Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Alien Arrivals in England (1810-1869)

Details on over 600,000 non-British citizens arriving in England. Often includes age and professions. Useful for discerning the origin of immigrants.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Wolverhampton Histories & Books

Black County Image Gallery (1300-Present)

A large collection of images, comprising largely of photographs and paintings of people and places, but also including photographs of physical items and other images.

West Midlands Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in West Midlands.

Chartism in the Black Country (1839-1848)

A history of the chartist movement in parts of Staffordshire and Worcestershire; a movement which attempted to widen the voting franchise. Includes the names of sympathisers.

The Staffordshire Views Collection (1800-1850)

A collection of over 3,000 watercolours, drawings, sketches, engravings and lithographs depicting scenes in Staffordshire.

A Survey of Staffordshire (1593-1600)

A topographical and historical survey of the county and its settlements.

Biographical Directories Covering Wolverhampton

Who's Who in Staffordshire (1844-1930)

A searchable directory of biographies depicting the leading residents of Staffordshire. Contains details on family relations, education, careers, hobbies and associations.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Wolverhampton Maps

Staffordshire & Stoke Maps (1670-2000)

A large collection of maps, primarily depicting Stoke and its environs.

Maps of Staffordshire (1602-1905)

Digital images of maps covering the county.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Wolverhampton Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Wolverhampton Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

Wolverhampton, an ancient and populous, though not a corporate town, situated on a rising ground, on the navigable canal, which has a communication with all the great rivers in the kingdom. The trade is deemed greater, and the inhabitants more opulent, than those of any other place in the county. Its name is derived from the words Wolver and Hampton; the first being the corruption of the name of a Saxon lady called Wulfruna, and the latter signifying free,

"A thriving town for arts Vulcanian fam’d,

"And from its foundress good Wulfruna nam’d."

The above-mentioned lady founded or amply, endowed, a monastery at this place, in the year 996, which, at the conquest, was in possession of secular canons. William Rufus gave this church to Sampson, bishop of Worcester, who settled it on the prior and convent of his own cathedral, and they held it till the reign of King Stephen, when it was taken from them by Roger, bishop of Salisbury. Shortly after, it was given to the King by the bishop of Chester, and the church of Lichfield; and it was again in the hands of secular canons, till the famous Petrus Blesensio, who was dean, resigned it into the hands of Hubert, archbishop of Canterbury, that he might build an abbey for monks of the Cistertian order; which, however, seems never to have been done, for the secular canons were in possession not long after, and continued so.

This church was accounted one of the King’s free chapels, and with the collation of prebendaries was annexed to the deanery of Windsor. In the reign of Edward the Sixth the college and prebends were granted to the Duke of Northumberland; but these coming again to the crown, by the duke’s attainder, the deanery and prebends were re-founded by Mary, and farther confirmed by James the First, who made the celebrated Marcus Antonius de Dominis, archbishop of Spalatro, and dean of Windsor, prebendary and Dean of Wolverhampton; and presented seven other clergymen, among whom were Joseph Hall, Gabriel Goodman, and Dr. Thomas Goad, to the other seven prebends, Hatherton, Wilnall, Fetherstone, Halton, Monmore, Stonewall, or Kinewaston, and Wobestan.

There are at present two churches in this town: St. Peter’s, which is collegiate, has a lofty square tower, eight bells, with chimes, and an organ: in it are several old monuments, and a brass statue of Sir Richard Leveson, who engaged the Spaniards under Sir Francis Drake: the pulpit is old, and is of stone; and in the church-yard is a very old stone cross. It has lately been repaired.

In the year 1755, an act of parliament was obtained, and a large subscription made, to build a new chapel in this town, which has since been completed in a plain and handsome manner, though, from the subscription being exhausted, no steeple was erected till the year 1776; it is dedicated to St. John, and is fitted up in the modern style of the London churches, and has in it an exceeding good organ, and a handsome altar-piece.

In the year 1394, Clement Lusen and William Waterfall, obtained the king’s license to build an hospital for a priest and six poor men; and in the year 1668 a charity school was built here, and endowed by Stephen Jennings, a native of this town, and Lord Mayor of London. There are also two other charity schools, one for fifty boys, and the other for forty girls.

An act of Parliament was obtained in June 1777, for lighting, paving, and otherwise improving this flourishing town. The parish is nearly thirty miles in compass, and contains, according to Sir William Dugdale, seventeen great villages, wherein are but three small chapels of ease, not capable of containing a tenth part of the inhabitants, who are computed to be near thirty thousand souls, and of these seven or eight thousand are thought of age to communicate. Within the jurisdiction are nine leets, whereof eight belong to the church. The dean is lord-borough of Wolverhampton, Codsall, Hatherton, and Petshall, and of Ludley in Worcestershire; and hath all manner of privileges belonging to the view of frank-pledge, goods, deodands, escheats, marriage of wards, and clerks of the markets, which is rated at 156l. a year, as the whole is at near 300l. a year. Each of the portionaries have a several leet.

Wolverhampton is a populous, well built, and healthy town, notwithstanding the adjacent coalmines, which is ascribed to its high situation: and it is said that the plague was hardly ever known here: but it is observed, that this town does not increase in buildings like Birmingham, as it is for the most part church land, and consequently the tenure not sufficient to encourage people to lay out their money upon it. Some alterations have been lately made in the centre of the town, by taking down some houses near the market place, to make a more direct line through the place for the Holyhead road.

The markets are on Wednesday, and a small one on Saturday. In the centre of the market-place has lately been erected a lofty column of stone, at the top of which is an immense glass lantern lighted by gas; it is supposed it was intended to light the street, but, alas, it is placed too high for any other purpose than to serve as a beacon to any poor benighted traveller who may be lost a few miles from the town. And the town consisted, according to the late population act, of 6718 houses and 36, 838 inhabitants.

Here are the most ingenious locksmiths in England: their locks are made in brass or iron boxes curiously polished. When they make six, eight, or more, in a suit, as they are bespoke, they will order the keys so, that neither of them shall open each other’s lock, but one master key shall open them all. By this means, when the locks are set on, and the inferior keys kept by distinct servants, neither of them can come at each other’s charge, yet the master can come at them all. Besides, the master turning his key in any of the servants’ locks but once extraordinary, the servants themselves cannot come at their charge; and if they attempt it, the key will only run round and hurt nothing.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

WOLVERHAMPTON is a parliamentary, municipal and county borough, market, union and railway town and parish, head of a petty sessional division and county court district, in the Kingswinford division of the county, hundreds of Seisdon, Cuttlestone and Offlow, rural deanery of Wolverhampton, archdeaconry of Stafford and diocese of Lichfield, 16 miles south from Stafford, 13 north-west from Birmingham, 51 from Macclesfield, 82 from Manchester, 84 ½ from Liverpool, 62 from Chester, 39 from Derby, 32 ½ south from Stoke, 5 ½ north from Dudley, 10 ½ north from Stourbridge, 17 north-by-east from Kidderminster, 27 from Droitwich, 32 from Worcester, 29 ½ from Shrewsbury, 79 from Oxford, 35 from Warwick and Leamington, 21 ½ from Coventry, 67 ¼ from Stockport, 64 ¾ from Bolton, 109 from Leeds, 92 from Huddersfield, 96 ½ from Bristol, 52 from Cheltenham, 59 from Gloucester, 51 from Nottingham, 84 from Sheffield and 125 from London.

Under the provisions of the “Local Government Act, 1888,” the town was declared a county borough for certain purposes of that Act, April 1st, 1889. The town of Wolverhampton is one of considerable antiquity, and prior to the year 996 was called “Hanton” or “Hamton,” when Wulfrana, sister to King Edgar and widow of Aldhelm, Earl of Northampton, founded a college here for a dean and several prebendaries or secular canons, and endowed it with so many privileges, that in honour of Wulfrana the town was called “Wulfranes Hampton,” of which its present name is a corruption.

The Birmingham and Liverpool, the Staffordshire and Worcestershire and the Wyrley and Essington canals pass through here. The London and North Western Railway station (called the “High Level Station”), at the bottom of Lichfield street, with an approach from that street of about 300 yards in length, is a building in the Italian style, presenting a frontage of 300 feet: the station was enlarged and improved in 1884 by the construction of additional platforms and a bridge erected from the down to the up platforms: the Midland Railway Co. have running powers into this station, with their own booking offices, staff &c. The Great Western (called the “Low Level station”), designed by the late Sir I. K. Brunei conjointly with Sir John Fowler K.C.M.G., is on the Wednesfield Heath road side of the Lichfield Street station, with which it has a footway communication.

The town, which stands on an eminence in the direct route from London to Holyhead, received a charter of incorporation, March 15, 1848, and is now governed by a mayor, twelve aldermen and thirty-six councillors, the mayor being elected from the forty-eight members of the whole municipal body. The borough is divided into eight wards, and the meetings of the council are held at the Town Hall. The Corporation act as the Urban District Council. The borough has a commission of the peace and a separate court of quarter sessions.

The parliamentary borough returned two members until the passing of the “Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885,” when the number was increased to three, the three divisions being the West division, comprising St. Mark’s, St. Paul’s, St. John’s, St. George’s and St. Matthew’s wards and so much of the parish of Bilston as is known as Ettingshall New Village; the East division, comprising the St. Mary’s, St. James’ and St. Peter’s wards and the parishes of Wednesfield and Willenhall; and the South division, comprising the parish of Sedgley and the parish of Bilston (except so much as is included in Division No. 1).

The town is paved, lighted by gas and the electric light, and well supplied with water from wells sunk to a great depth in the rock on which it is built. By an Act obtained in 1845 water works were erected under the auspices of a company, and opened in 1847: the water thus supplied is of a remarkably pure and soft character, and is obtained from springs in the red sandstone rock at Tettenhall and Goldthorn hill, where there are storage reservoirs capable of holding nearly 2,000,000 gallons: the works are now the property of the Corporation: a further supply is obtained from artesian wells at Cosford, in the parish of Albrighton, Salop, about 10 miles from Wolverhampton, where new pumping engines have been erected.

The Deanery of Wolverhampton having been suppressed by the “Wolverhampton Church Act, 1847—8” (11 & 12 Vict. c. 95), the township is divided into thirteen ecclesiastical parishes, and by an Order in Council, the former district churches are now parochial.

St. Peter’s church (formerly collegiate and until the reign of Henry III. dedicated to St. Mary) is a cruciform building of stone in the Decorated and Perpendicular styles, consisting of a long aisle less apsidal choir, transepts, nave of five bays, with aisles of equal width, south porch and an embattled central tower of two stages, panelled on the east, west and south sides, with four crocketed pinnacles, and containing a clock and twelve bells, of which the first and second date from 1827, the eleventh 1638, the tenor 1780 and the remainder 1698: the church is supposed to have been founded about the year 996 by Wulfrana, widow of Aldhelm, Earl of Northampton, and sister of King Edgar, whose charter was subsequently confirmed and enlarged by Edward the Confessor, Henry III. King John and subsequent monarchs: no part of the existing church is earlier then the beginning of the 13th century, to which period the lower part of the tower, south transept and some other portions may be assigned: Lane’s chancel, or north transept, erected at the close of the 15th or beginning of the 16th century, contains an altar-tomb and a monument on the east wall to the Lanes of Bentley, a family which rendered itself conspicuous in history by aiding the escape of Charles II. after his concealment in the woods of Boscobel: the piers and arches of the nave belong to the 15th century, and the elegant arcaded stone pulpit, with its stair affixed to the easternmost pier on the south side, dates from 1480: the choir was fitted in 1544 with stalls taken from the dissolved monastery of Lilleshall, and presented by Sir Walter Leveson kt. but during the Reformation period the church was greatly despoiled, and in 2 Edward VI. its lands and property were granted to John, Duke of Northumberland, who still further dismantled the fabric: a new charter, granted by Queen Mary, was confirmed by Elizabeth, but the Parliamentary troops, quartered here in 1642, ruthlessly mutilated the interior and destroyed the records: in 1682 the choir was rebuilt by Dr. Francis Turner, then dean, and in 1819 and 1834 extensive repairs were effected: in 1821—2 the organ was repaired and enlarged and in 1824—5 the churchyard inclosed with iron palisading: in 1846, on the death of the Very Rev. the Hon. Henry Lewis Hobart D.C.L, then dean, the collegiate establishment ceased to exist, and its property became vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; the last representative was the Rev. the Earl of Buckinghamshire M.A. prebendary of Kinvaston in this church, who died in 1885: there is a bronze statue by Le Soeur in the south transept of Vice-Admiral Sir Richard Leveson; an ancient octagonal panelled font, with curious symbols and devices, and memorial windows to the great Duke of Wellington, the late Bishop of Lichfield and others: the wall paintings in the chancel are very beautiful: in the porch is a tablet with the following inscription:-“In the year of our Lord 994, and in the reign of AEthelred II., the noble matron, Wulfrum, endowed the ancient monastery of St. Mary at Hamtun with lands at Earn-leie, Kynwaldestun, Bilsetna-tun, Willan-hale, Wodnesfeld, Poeles-hale, Oeging-tun, Hiltune, Hagenthorndun, Eswick, Hiltune (altero), Feotherstun. Sigeru, Archbishop of Westminster. AElfhead, Bishop of Lichfield.” The church was thoroughly restored during the period 1852—65 at a total cost of about £25,000, under the direction of Mr. Ewan Christian, architect, and in 1864—5, the choir was entirely rebuilt at a cost of about £5,000: in 1886 two new vestries were erected at a cost of about £1,500, and a monumental arcading built along the interior side of the north aisle wall: the total cost of restorations from 1873 to 1891 amounted to £5,704: the communion plate was presented by the Very Rev. Lord Willoughby de Broke D.D. dean 1713—29, and registrar of the Order of the Garter: there are 1,166 sittings: in the churchyard is an ancient shaft, supposed to be of the Early English period. The register dates from the 1603. The living is a rectory, gross yearly value £750, net £510, with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1895 by the Rev. Alfred Penny M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge, rural dean of Hanley, and surrogate.

The following are ecclesiastical parishes:—

All Saints parish was formed from that of St. John, July 26, 1881: the church, in Steel house lane, erected at a cost of £5,000, and consecrated on All Saints’ day, November 1, 1879, is a building of red sandstone and brick in the Gothic style, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, north porch and a bell turret: the chancel with side chapel, sacristy, choir vestry and organ chamber were erected in 1892 at a cost of £3,000: two memorial windows have been inserted to the late Mr. Frederick Lewis and the late Rev. Henry Hampton, vicar of St. John’s and founder of this parish: there are sittings for 754 persons. The register dates from the year 1879. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £230, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1890 by the Rev. John Warner, who is also chaplain of the General Hospital.

Christchurch was formed into a separate ecclesiastical parish October 27, 1876: the church, in Waterloo road, erected in 1886—7 at a cost of about £2,300, from designs by Mr. T. H. Fleeming, architect, of Wolverhampton, is a plain building of stone in the Early Decorated style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, vestry, organ chamber and a belfry containing one bell: the aisles were added in 1869 at a cost of £2,000 and the chancel in 1887 at a cost of £2,400: the stained east window was erected in 1893 at a cost of £145, to the memory of Mr. Stephen Richards, 24 years warden of this church, J. February 27, 1892: a painting on the south wall of the chancel by Mr. Wyndham Hughes, representing “The Feeding of the Five Thousand,” was dedicated in April, 1894, by the Bishop of Shrewsbury: there are 620 sittings. The register dates from the year 1870. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £200, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1889 by the Rev. Arthur Halsted Smith B.A. of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.

St. Andrew's parish was formed March 28, 1871: the chitchat Whitmore reans, erected in 1865, is a plain building of stone in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, but without a tower: it was enlarged in 1870 and the chancel added in 1891—2, at a cost of £2,476, from designs by Mr. F. Beck, of Wolverhampton, including two vestries, organ chamber and new oak screens and stalls: the stained east window is by Kempe, of London, and there is a brass lectern of unusual design: there are 800 sittings. The register dates from the year 1870. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £200, net £131, with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1885 by the Rev. James Michael John Fletcher M.A. of University College, Oxford, and chaplain of the Diocesan Day Evangelists’ Training Home, which is in this parish.

St. George’s parish was formed September 9, 1834: the church, in the Cleveland road, is a building of stone of the Doric order, erected and consecrated in 1830, at a cost of £6,000, and consists of chancel, nave, north, south and centre porches and a western tower with spire, containing a clock and one bell: over the communion table is a painting of the Deliverance of St. Peter from prison: the east window is stained, and there are sittings for 2,300 persons, 1,650 of which are free: the churchyard covers an area of four acres. The register dates from the year 1830. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £210, net £116, with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1888 by the Rev. Percy Lees Underhill M.A. of Magdalene College, Cambridge.

St. James’ parish was formed on March 10, 1849: the church, in Horseley fields, consecrated in 1843, is a building of stone in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and a low and massive embattled western tower, containing one bell: there are sittings for 700 persons, 300 being free. The register dates from the year 1845. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £275, with residence, in the gift of trustees, and held since 1895 by the Rev. John William Dixon of St. Bees. St. Barnabas church, Wednesfield road, erected in 1892, is a structure of red brick, seating 300 persons, and is attached to St. James’ parish.

St. John’s parish was formed March 10, 1849: the church, in St. John’s square, erected 1755—60, is a building of stone, in the Italian style, consisting of nave, aisles and it tower with lofty spire containing a clock and one bell: the altar-piece, representing “The Descent from the Cross,” was presented by Joseph Barney, a native of this town, and there are six stained windows: considerable improvements were made in the church in 1869, at a cost of upwards of £ 1,800: the organ, built by Renatus Harris, was repaired some time since at a cost of £200, and again repaired in 1883: the font was presented by the Right Rev. the Hon. Adelbert J. Robert Anson M.A. hon. canon of Rochester, formerly curate here and Bishop of Qu’Appelle, Canada, 1884—93: in 1881—2 the body of the church was repewed and a new pulpit and choir stalls erected at a cost of £724: there are 1,250 sittings 600 being free. The register dates from the year 1840. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £250, with residence, in the gift of trustees, and held since 1880 by the Rev. Robert Birkley Forrester M.A. of Wadham College, Oxford.

St. Luke's parish was formed September 5, 1862: the church, at Blakenhall, on the extreme southern boundary of Wolverhampton, and consecrated in July, 1861, is a building of variously coloured bricks, from the designs of Mr. G. T. Robinson, of Leamington, and consists of apsidal chancel, nave, aisles and side chapel, a long western porch or cloister, extending the whole width of the church and uniting it with a tower and spire, upwards of 170 feet in height, and containing an illuminated clock and one bell: the tiles with which the chancel is laid were the gift of the late Herbert Minton esq.; the font was presented by Mrs. Dalton; the communion table, chairs and vestments by Mrs. W. H. Rogers; and the cost of carving one bay of the nave and the wrought-iron foliage to one pair of capitals was defrayed by the late Rev. W. Dalton; a similar gift, together with one of the angels at the east end, proceeded from the architect: an organ was introduced in 1884 at a cost of £400: there are 800 sittings, of which 500 are free. The register dates from the year 1862. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £275, with residence, in the gift of five trustees, and held since 1889 by the Rev. William Thomas Milligan M.A. of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge.

St. Mark’s parish was formed March 24, 1846: the church, at Chapel Ash, consecrated in 1849, is a building of stone, in the Early English style, from designs by Mr. Oxford, of Birmingham, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, north and south porches and a western tower with spire, containing a clock and one bell: there are several stained windows: there are 1,350 sittings, 850 being free. The register dates from the year 1850. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £400, with residence, in the gift of trustees, and held since 1893 by the Rev. Henry Legh Richmond Deck M.A. of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge, and surrogate.

St. Mary’s parish was formed May 29, 1843: the church, in Stafford street, erected and endowed by Miss Hinckes, and consecrated in 1842, is a building of white brick, in a plain Gothic style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, transepts and a tower with turret and spire, containing one bell, which has a rich border and is inscribed-COM COM AND PRAYE 1604 E. S.; it formerly hung in Tettenhall church and was purchased for St. Mary’s in 1841, when a new peal was provided at Tettenhall: the fine altar piece or reredos is old Flemish work, circa 1640, and represents in high relief the “Crucifixion” and “Ascension” of our Saviour: the communion table, chairs and choir stalls are all carved, and there is an ancient wooden lectern with the figure of an eagle grasping a serpent: the eastern lancets are filled with ancient Flemish glass, and the lancet windows on the north and south sides contain German glass: in the south transept is a memorial window to the Rev. George Fraser B.D. first incumbent of the church, 1842—67, and in the south aisle are two stained lancets commemorating the Jubilee of the church: the ancient Norman font, discovered in a farmyard, has been restored and re-set: the communion plate of silver is of considerable antiquity: in 1887 a new vestry was built on the north side of the chancel, the choir enlarged, and the pulpit altered and re-erected at a cost (including the enlargement of the infants’ school) of £600: in 1890—1 further improvements were effected at a cost of £550, including the demolition of the aisle galleries and the renovation and decoration of the whole of the interior of the church: there are 630 sittings. The register dates from the year 1842. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £300, net £245, with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1882 by the Rev. Charles Dunkley, who is a surrogate.

St. Stephen’s School-Church, Springfield, attached to St. Mary’s parish, was erected in 1880, and will seat 255 persons: the Good Shepherd Mission-room, Cannock road, is served by lay-helpers, and will hold 60 persons: the Lichfield Diocesan Barge Mission hall, erected in 1883, at Top Lock, Canal street, is also in this parish.

St. Matthew’s parish was formed March 24, 1846: the church, on the Walsall road, at the junction of the street called Horseley fields, and consecrated in 1849, is a stone edifice in the Early English style, designed by the late Mr. E. Banks, and consists of chancel, nave of four bays, aisles, north and south porches and a turret containing one bell: the interior was thoroughly restored and reseated in 1892, at a cost of £1,000, when the chancel was raised and choir stalls and a stained west window erected and a new organ provided: there are 714 sittings, of which 616 are free. The register dates from the year 1849. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £300, with residence, in the gift of five trustees, and held since 1889 by the Rev. Sampson Cordon, of St. Aidans.

St. Matthew’s Mission Room, Monmore green, was erected in 1848 by the Chillington Company.

St. Paul’s parish was formed in 1835: the church, on the Penn road, is a building of stone, in the Gothic style, erected chiefly at the cost of the late Rev. William Dalton and the late Mrs. Dalton, and consecrated by the late Bishop Ryder in July, 1835; it consists of chancel, nave, west porch and a turret containing one bell, and has a stained window presented by the congregation in memory of Mrs. Dalton: in 1884 the church was reseated, refloored and improved in other ways, at a cost of £1,438, and in 1894 a font was presented by General Kent in memory of his wife: there are sittings for 1,163 persons, of which 550 are free. The register dates from the year 1835. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £330, with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield, and held since 1882 by the Rev. Edward Forster Wanstall M.A. of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

St. Jude’s parish was formed August 10, 1869: the church, on the Tettenhall road, was erected at a cost of upwards of £5,000, mainly by the munificence of Miss Stokes, who gave the site for the building and £2,000 towards its endowment: it is an edifice in the Gothic style, and consists of chancel, transepts, nave, aisles and a western turret with spire, and was consecrated by the Bishop of Lichfield in April, 1869: there is a fine reredos and a stained east window erected as a memorial to Mrs. Mander, by her husband, C. B. Mander esq.: the organ was erected in 1874, and the brass lectern was presented in 1886 by W. Davies esq. in memory of his deceased wife: the stained west window was erected by the parishioners in 1894 at a cost of £460, as a memorial to the late Rev. S. C. Adams M.A. 25 years vicar of this parish: the church was restored in 1878 and 1890 at a total cost of £2,087: there are 820 sittings, 250 being free. The register dates from the year 1869. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £350, chiefly derived from pew rents, in the gift of five trustees, and held since 1893 by the Rev. Octavius Frank Walton B.A. of St. John’s College, Cambridge.

The Catholic church on Snow hill, dedicated to SS. Mary and John and consecrated in 1855, is a building of stone, in the Gothic style, from designs by Mr. Hansom, architect, of Clifton, consisting of apsidal chancel with aisles, chapels and sacristies (erected at a separate cost of £7,000), nave, aisles and transepts, the entire length being 150 feet: the centre window of the apse is filled with richly stained glass, presented by John Gaunt esq. of Jersey: the high altar, 10 feet in length, is supported on six marble shafts with carved capitals: the reredos is upwards of is feet in breadth by 12 feet high, the centre having a richly carved tabernacle surmounted by an open canopy about 20 feet high, and is flanked by two richly canopied niches, containing statues of SS. Mary and John, the patron saints: in May, 1884, a memorial window was presented to the church by the widow and family of the late James Gibbons esq. of Merridale Grove, and another window by Peter Cremonini, of Wolverhampton: there are 1,052 sittings.

SS. Peter and Paul’s Catholic church, North street, dates from the year 1725, but was enlarged in 1743, and for 22 years served as the cathedral of the central district, which comprised the whole or great part of the Catholic dioceses of Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Northampton and Nottingham; it is of brick, in the Italian style, consisting of nave and transept, and has a fine altar and communion rails of exquisitely wrought white and coloured marbles, erected at a cost of £500: Bishop Milner, who came to reside here in 1804, is buried in a vault beneath the church, and a memorial brass marks his resting place: there are 500 sittings.

The Catholic church, Westbury street, dedicated to St. Patrick, designed by Pugin, and opened May 21, 1867, affords sittings for 500 persons. The Convent of the Sisters of Mercy is in St. John’s square.

The Presbyterian church, at the corner of Lord street, Merridale road, erected at a cost of about £5,000, from designs by Mr. Bidlake, is a plain building, with a tower and spire rising to the height of 96 feet: it was opened in October, 1870, and has about 800 sittings.

The Unitarian church is a plain building, situated on Snow hill, with 140 sittings.

Trinity Wesleyan chapel, in the Compton road, erected on a site given by John Hartley esq. of Tong Castle, is a building of Gornal stone, in the Gothic style, with a recess at the south end, and at the north end a tower with lofty spire: there are galleries all round, except at the south end, where there is a stained window, the gift of the Right Hon Sir H. H. Fowler G.C.S.I., P.C., M.P.: there are marble tablets to J. Perks esq. and his wife: there are 1,050 sittings, of which 300 are free.

The Congregational church on Snow hill is a structure in the Early English style, and has 900 sittings.

The Congregational church in Queen street, erected in 1865, on the site of the old one, is a building of stone, with tower and spire at the north-west corner, and will seat 1,200 persons.

The Baptist chapel, Waterloo road south, is an edifice of red brick, erected in 1864, at a cost of upwards of £4,000, and has been enlarged at a cost of about £1,000: there are about 900 sittings.

There are numerous chapels belonging to various other Dissenting bodies, for which see pp. 481—2.

The General Cemetery, at Merridale, about miles from the town, covers an area of about 24 acres, and was formed under an Act obtained by a company of proprietors in 1847, at a total expense of about £11,000; there are suitable chapels and ranges of vaults, and at the south end stands a cast-iron column, erected by his workmen to the late G. B. Thorneycroft esq. first mayor of this town.

The Town hall, in North street, is a structure in the Italian style, built at a cost of about £19,000, exclusive of the greater portion of the site, from designs by Mr. E. Bates, architect, of Manchester: it contains, on the ground floor, an entrance hall and vestibule, sessions and magistrates’ courts and offices in connection therewith, council chambers, municipal offices, waterworks’, borough surveyor’s, electric lighting and poor rate offices; on the second floor are committee rooms, the mayor’s parlour and recorder’s rooms; in the basement are cells for prisoners, and attached is a spacious courtyard, extending to Red Lion street, with offices for the police and a fire engine house: at the end of the vestibule there is a fine statue of G. B. Thorneycroft esq.

The Corporation possess a silver-gilt crowned mace, 3 feet 2 inches in height, originally belonging to the borough of St. Mawes, in Cornwall, to which it was presented in July, 1822, by Richard, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Chandos K.G. lord of the manor of St. Mawes, but the municipality of that borough being dissolved on the passing of the Municipal Corporations Act, 1835, the mace was returned to the donor, and at the great Stowe Sale in June, 1849, was disposed of to Messrs. Town & Emmanuel, of London, of whom it was purchased by the late B. Thorneycroft esq. and presented to the town of Wolverhampton: the head of the mace bears the London hall mark of 1821, and on the sides are engraved the royal arms, a copy of the borough seal and the arms of the donor.

The Exchange, adjoining the Market place, was erected in the year 1851, from the designs by Mr. Robinson, architect, at a cost of £15,000, raised in shares: the room is 120 feet long by 50 feet wide, and has a gallery and a permanent platform and orchestra, capable of containing 100 performers: this building is used for iron masters’ and other public meetings, balls and concerts, for which purpose it is well adapted.

The Agricultural Hall, Snow hill, erected by a limited company at an outlay of about £8,000, is a building with a facade of Bath stone, in the Italian style, and was opened in April, 1863; it is now used as a Corn Exchange, and covers a space of 1,200 square yards: the large room is 160 feet long and 60 feet in width, and has an orchestra capable of holding 300 persons, with an organ; underneath are retiring rooms; one portion of this room is intended for the farmers and dealers, and the other for the exhibition of implements; concerts and public meetings are also held here: adjoining the large hall is an apartment 40 feet long by 26 wide, used as a settling room on market days, as well as an auction and show room.

The Market Hall, opened in March, 1853, is a structure of wood, iron and glass, erected at a cost of about £30,000, from designs by Mr. Lloyd, of Bristol, and is divided into three compartments, averaging 100 feet in length; the market is now in the hands of the Corporation, and the tolls and the stalls yield a yearly profit to the town of between £3,000 and £4,000, which is gradually increasing.

The markets are held twice a week-on Wednesday for cattle, corn and provisions, and on Wednesday and Saturday for meat and vegetables. A large pleasure fair is annually held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in Whitsun week.

The Cattle Market, on the Cleveland road, adjacent to St. George’s church, occupies an area of 4 ½ acres, thoroughly well drained and with an abundant supply of water; it will hold 800 head of cattle, 500 to 700 horses, 5,000 sheep and 3,000 pigs. The Fat Pig market, situated in Bilston street and adjoining the general cattle market, was opened in January, 1856; it will hold about 800 animals, distributed in pens of 40 each; it is covered with glass and corrugated iron, forming a closed, but, at the same time, thoroughly ventilated market.

In Queen square is an equestrian statue of the late Prince Consort, unveiled by her Majesty the Queen, on the last day of November, 1866.

On Snow hill is a statue, executed in Sicilian marble, by Mr. W. Theed, of London, of the Right Honorable Charles Pelham Villiers M.P. and unveiled by the late Right Hon. Earl Granville K.G. 6th June, 1879: the statue was erected in recognition of the services of the right honorable gentleman as then representative of Wolverhampton in Parliament for upwards of 45 years, and especially as a memorial of his prominent and successful efforts in the repeal of the Cora Laws; the statue is of heroic dimensions, measuring 9 feet in height, and stands on a pedestal of grey Aberdeen granite, and was erected at a cost of upwards of £1,000, defrayed by public subscriptions.

There are four banks in the town. Five newspapers are published here.

The Post Office, in Queen street, is a building of stone, erected in 1872; new premises were in 1895 erected in Lichfield street.

The Wolverhampton Baths, in the Bath place, and erected in the year 1860 by a joint stock company, are now the property of the Corporation, by whom they were purchased in 1875 for a sum of £2,150.

The Grand Theatre, in Lichfield street, erected in 1894 is a structure of red brick with stone dressings, from designs by C. J. Phipps esq. architect, of London, at a cost of£12,000, and will seat 2,500 persons; the interior is fitted with the electric light.

The Star Theatre and Concert Hall, in Bilston street, is a building in the Elizabethan style, and was entirely rebuilt in 1883.

The Theatre Royal, Cleveland road, was erected in 1844; the original theatre was at the top of the Swan Hotel yard, in Queen square, and was built about 1779; here it is believed the great tragedian John Kemble made his debut; Mrs. Siddons appeared here on many occasions: it is at present (1895) closed.

The Wolverhampton Conservative Club occupies the Deanery; it was opened in May, 1877, and has 230 members: the club is well fitted up and has all the convenience usually found in a first-class club; excellent grounds are attached.

The Wolverhampton Liberal Club, North street, was established in 1882, and has 100 members.

The Villiers Reform Club, 69 Victoria street, was established in January, 1883, and has about 700 members.

The Blakenhall Conservative Club, opened Nov. 7th, 1892, is a neat edifice of red brick, consisting of billiard, reading, smoking and games rooms &c. and has about 250 members.

The Central Conservative Working Men’s Club, established Jan. 18th, 1884, is in Queen street, and has 1,300 members.

The North Wolverhampton Working Men’s Club, 72 North street, was established Dec. 17th, 1892, and has about 1,180 members; the club, which is well fitted up, comprises a lecture room seating 400, reading, smoking, bagatelle and games rooms and a bowling saloon.

The Art Gallery and Museum, in New Lichfield street, standing on land given by the Corporation, were erected at a cost of over £9,000, and presented to the town by the late Philip Horsman esq. who also bequeathed to this institution the whole of his pictures, which were placed in the gallery in 1895; the buildings are of Bath stone, in the Classic style, from designs by Mr. Chatwin, architect, of Birmingham, and the facades exhibit two orders of architecture, the Doric being employed for the ground-floor storey and the Ionic for the storey above; the ground floor is devoted to the museum and the upper storey to the picture galleries; the front of this storey and the side facing St. Peter’s church is filled in with sculptured panels in Portland stone, containing emblematic figures in bold relief, by Boulton, of Cheltenham, representing Painting, Sculpture and Science; the rooms for the art museum are altogether 152 feet in length, and the galleries, also consisting of a suite of rooms, have a total length of 176 feet. Adjoining the Art Gallery, in St. Peter’s close, is the School of Art, erected in 1884, at a cost of £5,000.

The Young Men’s Christian Association, formed in Oct. 1892, occupies premises in Darlington street, and has 300 members.

The Wolverhampton Free Library, Garrick street, has libraries, lecture hall, museum, science class rooms and a reading room; there are about 34,000 volumes in the library, including a reference library of 5,000 volumes and a lending library.

The Church Institute, St. Peter’s square, is a structure of red brick opened Jan. 28th. 1893, at a total cost of about £3,000, and consists of a large hall, seating 400 persons, and smaller rooms used for classes, guilds and a gymnasium &c.

The head quarters of the 3rd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, in Stafford street, erected at a cost of about £8,000, form a considerable pile in an Early Gothic style, from designs by Mr. Daniel Arkell, architect, of Birmingham, and have a central tower; the Stafford street block contains on the ground floor an orderly room, adjutant’s room, armouries, stores for clothing, waiting rooms and lavatories: on the first floor are two large assembly rooms, with ante-rooms &c. and on the second floor are kitchens, stores and caretakers’ rooms. The Drill Hall is 184 feet long and 76 feet wide, and has a stage at one end and a gallery at the other and is provided with cloak rooms and lavatories: in the basement are stores for baggage &c. and a heating apparatus.

Wolverhampton is also the head quarters and place of assembly of the Staffordshire Volunteer Infantry Brigade.

The Wolverhampton and Staffordshire General Hospital, in the Cleveland road, is a building in the Italian style, erected from the plans of the late Mr. Edward Banks, at a cost of about £20,000, raised by subscriptions; it contains 231 beds: during the year 1894, 16,498 patients have been treated by its medical officers; of these 100 were in-patients and 14,398 out-patients. The ordinary expenditure has amounted to £8,082, the income being about £7,504. The hospital is managed by a board of 12 gentlemen, who meet once a week: annual sermons are preached in its behalf i all places of worship in the town.

The Wolverhampton Eye Infirmary, Compton road, was established June, 1881; the new building, erected from designs by Mr. T. H. Fleeming, of this town, at a cost of £8,000 and opened in 1888, is an irregular gabled structure in a simple Gothic style, with two spired turrets, and has three men’s and three women’s wards, with thirty beds and five children’s cots: the in-patients’ department was erected principally at the cost of the lata P. Horsman esq. at an estimated cost of £5,000; it is supported by voluntary contributions.

Wolverhampton and District Hospital for Women, established in 1886, was used for out-patients only until 1889, when it was removed from Cleveland road to the old premises of the Eye Hospital, St. Mark’s place, Chapel Ash, and an in-patients’ department was then added, consisting of two wards containing six beds and one ovarian ward.

The Queen Victoria Nursing Institution, Bath road, was established in 1887 to commemorate the Jubilee of H. M. the Queen, and new buildings were erected in 1895 at a cost, including site, of about £4,000: a district nursing home in St. Paul's terrace for the supply of nurses to the poor is carried on in connection with this institution.

The Wolverhampton Society for the Out-door Blind was formed in October, 1882: the premises of the society in Victoria street consist of a large sale room, library, music room and manager’s office, committee room, work and store rooms, and there is also a spacious yard: the object of the society is to improve as far as possible the condition of the indigent blind of Wolverhampton and neighbourhood by appointing teachers to seek out and visit them at their homes, and to teach them to read by means of books with raised type, as well as in special cases to give lessons in music and to find employment for any who can work at suitable trades: instruction is also given in various trades in the workshops provided for the purpose: the society is supported by donations and subscriptions and by the sale of work done by its dependants.

The Wolverhampton Orphan Asylum, at Goldthorn hill, is a noble building in the Elizabethan style, erected from designs by the late Mr. Joseph Manning, of Corsham, Wilts, at a total cost of upwards of £30,000, including an infirmary subsequently added at a cost of £1,400: the central hall is large and lofty and contains full-length portraits of the founder, John Lees esq. of Pickersgill; the Rev. Prebendary Dalton, first honorary chaplain, by I. Archer; and W. H. Rogers esq. late chairman of the committee, by the same artist: in the gallery is a fine organ: an elegant fountain has been erected on the lawn in front of the building as a memorial to the late Mrs. Rogers, wife of W. H. Rogers esq.: about 300 children are admitted from all parts of the kingdom. A new chapel was erected in 1895, from designs by Mr. F. T. Beck, of this town, at a cost of £4,000, including the organ, and consists of chancel, nave, transepts, vestry and a turret containing one bell, and will seat 400 persons.

The charities, amounting to about £50 yearly, are distributed in bread, and there is £8 for clothing and other relief.

South Staffordshire is the oldest centre of the iron trade in England. Remains of Roman iron furnaces have been discovered from time to time in various parts of the district.

The manufactures of the town consist principally of ironmongery, hardware, locks and keys of every description, gas, locomotive and other tubing, pump work, tools, malt and coffee mills, kitchen furniture, coach ironmongery, iron fencing, iron boxes, iron and steel travelling trunks and steel toys; under the latter name are included corkscrews, snuffers, nutcrackers and nippers: the manufacture of bicycles and tricycles and electric light apparatus &c. is extensively carried on: cabinet, rim, Bramah, mortice, plate, stock, Banbury, Norfolk, Dutch locks, letter padlocks and sash fastenings are also made here, as well as files, rasps, vices, anvils, hammers, gimlets, bits, shovels, hoes and other tools, besides nails, hasps, hinges, door catches, table catches, thumb latches, door springs, bed hooks, shutter bars kitchen furniture, including grates, saucepans, gridirons, bellows and fire irons, are likewise manufactured, and there are makers of scale-beams, sail thimbles, buckles, rack pulleys, tobacco boxes, iron safes, tin and cut nails and spectacles frames: another important branch of manufacture consists of tin and iron japanned wares, enamelled goods and papier-mache articles, which the town has long produced in large quantities both for home and foreign supply, and is still celebrated tor the manufacture of the most elegant and expensive tea trays, caddies, waiters and bread baskets: the manufacture of japanned and tin wares was introduced into Wolverhampton from South Wales about the middle of the last century, and this town and the adjacent township of Bilston may be regarded as the most important centres of these industries in the kingdom: nails, shoe tips and shoe heels are also made here, and there are very extensive iron works, smelting furnaces, iron and brass foundries, chemical works, japan, color and varnish works, grease works, maltings, breweries, corn mills, cooperages, rope walks, sacking lofts, coach works, saw mills and crate works; the whole of the district to the south and east of the town is worked for coal and ironstone, great quantities of which are supplied to the blast furnaces in the county: the Rowley ragstone is found in the coal mines in this parish, and frequently in large masses, sometimes penetrating the thick stratum of coal at a depth of from 300 to 400 feet from the surface.

The depth of the coal measures from the surface, as well as the thickness of the measures themselves, greatly varies; the former ranges from 20 to 1,500 feet, and the latter from 4 inches to 10 yards. Ten acres is considered an average quantity of coal to raise by one pair of pits, 50 acres being considered a large colliery.

The Wolverhampton Park, formerly the racecourse or broad meadows, covers an area of 50 acres, and is held on a lease by the Corporation from the trustees of the late Duke of Cleveland K.G. for 65 years, at an average rent of £350 yearly, with option of purchase afterwards; the laying out of the park was completed in 1880 by Mr. Vertegans, of Edgbaston, and it is now planted with shrubs and trees and inclosed; there are four entrances with lodges for the park keepers, and the park includes a drill ground of 6 acres for the volunteers, two cricket grounds, bowling green, archery ground &c.; there are also two lakes connected by a narrow neck of water spanned by an ornamental iron bridge, and occupying altogether about 8 acres; and in the centre of each lake artificial islands have been formed, planted with trees, where numerous water fowl are bred: the whole of the works were carried out at a cost of about £13,000 and the park was formally opened on 6 June, 1881; considerable improvements have since been effected, including the erection of a band stand, the gift of the Right Hon. C. P. Villiers M.P. and a tower clock presented by Mr. John Ross; the lata Edwin Butler esq. left £5,000, the interest thereof to be expended in providing music in the park during the summer months, and a floral fete is held yearly in July.

Dunstall Park racecourse is about 150 acres in extent, partly in the borough and partly in Bushbury and was formed in 1888: meetings are held for steeplechasing in January, February, Easter, October and December, and for flat racing at Whitsuntide and in August.

The East End Park, Willenhall road, is now (1895) in course of formation, and will consist of about 50 acres, 25 of which were given by Sir Alfred Hickman M.P. and 25 by the late Duke of Sutherland K.G.; the total cost, estimated at £10,000, will be defrayed by the Corporation.

There is a manor of the deanery of Wolverhampton, for which a court-leet is held once a year, at which the chief constable was formerly chosen. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England and Wales and Lord Barnard are lords of the manor; the latter is the principal landowner.

The soil on the west and north of the town is rich and fertile. The geological strata are limestone, ironstone and beds of various thickness of coal formation.

The area of Wolverhampton entire parish is 17,499 acres; township, 3,494 acres of land and 31 of water; rateable value (1894), £323,472; the population in 1881 was 75,766, and in 1891, 82,622, including 202 in the South Staffordshire General Hospital and 803 officers and inmates in the Workhouse.

The population of the municipal wards in 1891 was:—

S . George, 10,791; St. James, 7,980; St. John, 12,443; St. Mark, 14,281; St. Mary, 11,095; St. Matthew, 8,856; St. Paul, 13,170; St. Peter, 4,046.

The population of the ecclesiastical parishes in 1891 was:-St. Peter, 3,797; All Saints, 7,353; Christ Church, 5,273; St. Andrew, 5,761; St. George, 6,459; St. James, 5,766; St. John, 5,529; St. Jude, 3,152; St. Luke, 5,958; St. Mark, 10,194; St. Mary, 8,071; St. Matthew, 6,504; St. Paul, 8,737.

The population of the parliamentary borough in 1881 was:-Wolverhampton, 75,766; Bilston, 22,730; Sedgley, 36,574; Wednesfield, 10,801; Willenhall, 18,461; total, 164,332: and in 1891, East Division, 54,511; West Division, 62,744; and South Division, 57,110; total, 174,365.

The Wolverhampton Petty Sessional Division comprises the several parishes, townships & places of Bushbury, Codsall, Oaken, Patshull, Pattingham, Pendeford, Penn (Lower), Penn (Upper), Tettenhall, Wednesfield, Wrottesley, Womborne, Woodford, Trysull, Seisdon, Essington & Bentley.

Petty Sessions are held by the county justices at the Sessions court, Town hall, North street, on mondays only, at 12 noon.

Borough Petty Sessions are held at the Town hall every monday, tuesday, thursday & Saturday at 11 a.m. & by the stipendiary on Wednesday & friday.

VOLUNTEERS

Staffordshire (Queen’s Own Royal Regiment) Yeomanry Cavalry.

Detachment of D Squadron, H. S. Hill, captain.

Staffordshire Volunteer Infantry Brigade. Formed of the:—

1st Volunteer Battalion South Staffs. Reg. head quarters, Handsworth.

2nd Volunteer Battalion South Staffs. Reg. head quarters, Walsall.

3rd Volunteer Battalion South Staffs. Reg.

1st Volunteer Battalion North Staffs. Reg. head quarters.

2nd Volunteer Battalion North Staffs. Reg. head quarters, Burton-upon-Trent.

Supply Detachment & Bearer Company.

3rd Volunteer Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment (comprising A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, K, L, & M Companies); head quarters of Battalion & A, B & C & I, K & L Companies, Stafford street.

WOLVERHAMPTON UNION

Board day, Friday at 10 a.m.; Board room, Bilston Road.

The Union comprises the township of Bilston, Heath Town, Short Heath, Wednesfield, Willenhall & Wolverhampton. The population in 1891 was 137,505; area 11,147 acres; rateable value in 1895, £462,381.

The Workhouse, Bilston road, built in 1836 at a cost of £9,000, to hold 818 inmates.

The Cottages Homes, Wednesfield, erected in 1890 at a cost of about £16,000, for the children of the Wolverhampton Union, consists of eight homes, each for 30 children.

Places of Worship.

Churches.

St. Peter, Old Churchyard, Rev. Alfred Penny M.A. rector; Revs. Thomas Charles Keble M.A. & Charles P. Way B.A. curates; 8 & 11 a.m. 3.30 & 6.30 p.m.; daily 8.30 a.m. & 7 p.m.; litany on wed. & Fri. at 10.15 a.m.; holy communion Thur. 7.30 a.m.

St. George, Cleveland road, Rev. Percy Lees Underhill M.A. vicar; Rev. William Armstrong, curate; 8 & 11 a.m., 3.15 & 6.30 p.m.; saints days 10 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.; thurs. 7.30 a.m.

St. James, Horseley fields. Rev. John William Dixon, vicar; Rev. C. Callow, curate; 8 & 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m. 7 daily 7.30 a.m. Thur. 7.30 p.m.

St. John’s, St. John’s square. Rev. Robert Birkley Forrester M.A. vicar; Rev. James W. Wilkinson B.A. curate; 8 & 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; daily 8 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

St. Mark's, Chapel Ash, Rev. Henry Legh Richmond Deck M.A vicar; Rev. H. C. Knight & Rev. A. L. Bickerstaff M.A. curates; 11 a.m. 3.30 & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30.

St. Mary, Stafford street, Rev. Charles Dunkley, vicar; Rev. Alfred Archer & Rav. William Harrison Towle, curates; 8 & 11 a.m. 3 & 6.30 p.m.; daily 8 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

St. Matthew, Lower Horseley fields, Rev. Sampson Cordon, vicar; Rev. Charles Alfred Griffin & Rev. William Henry Fletcher B.A. curates; 11 a.m. 3 & 3.30 p.m.; wed. & Thur. 7.30 p.m.

St. Paul, Penn road, Rev. Edward Forster Wanstall M.A. vicar; Rev. Edwin Walter Stringer, curate; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

St. Luke, Blakenhall, Rev. William Thomas Milligan M.A. vicar; Rev. Arthur Prince Davis B.A. curate; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Christchurch, Waterloo road north, Rev. Arthur Halsted Smith B.A. vicar; Rev. Richard William Morbey, curate; 7.30, 10.30 & 11.15 a.m. & 3.15 & 6.30 p.m.; daily 7.15 & 8 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

St. Andrew’s, Whitmore reans, Rev. James Michael John Fletcher M.A. vicar; (vacant) curate; 7.30 & 11 a.m. & 3 & 6.30 p.m.; daily 7.45 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

St. Jude, Tettenhall road, Rev. Octavius Frank Walton B.A. vicar; Rev. Georga J. Lodge B.A. curate; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m. wed. 7.30 p.m.

All Saints, Steelhouse lane, Rev. John Warner, vicar; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. & Fri. 7.30 p.m.; saints days 8 & 9.15 a.m. & 7.30 p.m.

Trinity Reformed Episcopal, Waterloo road north, various; 11 a m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Catholic, St. Mary & John, Snow hill. Very Rev. Canon Henry Barwise Davies M.R. Rev. Francis Swift, Rev. Jeremiah McCarthy, priests; mass 8, 10 & 11.15 a.m. catechism & instructions 3 & vespers, sermon & benediction 6.30 p.m.; daily mass 3 & 9.30 a.m.; Thur. benediction 8 p.m.; holidays of obligation, mass 6.30, 8 & 10.30 a.m.

Catholic, St. Patrick, Westbury street, Rev. James Joseph Darmody, priest; mass 8 & 10.30 a.m. & vespers, sermon & benediction 6.30 p.m.; daily mass at 8 a.m.; Thur. benediction 8 p.m.

Catholic, SS. Peter & Paul, North street, Very Rev. Canon George Duckett R.D. Rev. Thomas Dickinson, priests; mass at 8, 10 & 11.15 a.m. & catechising instruction 3 & devotions, lecture & benediction 6.30 p.m.; daily mass at 8 a.m. & on days of obligation at 8 & 10 a.m.; benediction Thur. at 8 p.m.

Jew’s Synagogue, Fryer street. Rev. Isaac Levi, rabbi; sat, 9 & 1. p.m. & daily at sunset.

Presbyterian, Merridale road. Rev. John Beveridge M.A., B.D. 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 8.

Catholic Apostolic, Bath road, Rev. Thomas Grant Young; 10 a.m. & 5 p.m.; daily Baptist.

Waterloo road south. Rev. Frederick Charles Player; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Cannon, street; 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Temple street; 10.30 & 6.30 p.m.

Christadelphian Meeting Co-operative hall, Stafford street; 6.30 p.m.

Christian Meeting House, Molineux street; various, 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 8 p.m.

Congregational

Queen street; Rev. Charles A. Berry D.D. Rev. J. S. Drummond; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Snowhill; Rev. C. Frederick Bone; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Lower Stafford street; 6.30 p.m.; tues. 7.30.

York street; 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Methodist New Connexon, Horseley fields, Rev. George William Crutchley; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; tues. 7.30 p.m.

Primitive Methodist

Dudley road, Rev. William H. Taylor; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; tues. 7.30 p.m.

Culwell street; 10.45 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Tues. 7.30 p.m.

Great Brickkiln st.; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; thur 7.30 p.m.

Moore st. Rev. J. Bacon, 10.45 a.m. & 6 p.m.; tues. 8 p.m.

Bilston road, 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.

United Methodist Free Church, Cleveland street, Rev. H. J. Jordan; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 8 p.m.

Unitarian, Snow hill, Rev. L. C. Harris Crook; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.

Welsh Presbyterian, St. George’s parade, Rev. Isaac Davies, 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Wesleyan

Darlington street circuit

Darlington street; Rev. James J. Prescott, Rev. Thomas H. Whitamore & Rev. John Wright; Rev. John Hutchinson Norton, supernumerary; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 7.30 p.m.

Bilston road (Wesley chapel); 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Ranelagh road; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; tues. 7.30 p.m.

Grimstone street; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Pountney street; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.

Trinity circuit

Compton road, Rev. Henry Burn Clough & Rev. George Chapman Coad; Rev. Aaron Edman, Rev. Ralph Calderbank, supernumeraries; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; thurs. 7.30 p.m.

New Hampton road; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Penn road; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.

Merridale street; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Mon. 8 p.m.

Mission Rooms

St. George’s, Commercial road; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; tues. 7.30 p.m.

St. Mark’s, School street, & St. Michael’s, St. John’s street; served from St. Peter’s; 11.15 a.m. & 7 p.m.

St. Matthews, Monmore green; 3 & 7 p.m.

St. Paul’s, Little Brickkiln street; wed. 8 p.m.

St. Stephen’s Mission Church, Springfield (served by ministers of St. Mary’s); 8 & 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.

Meeting Room, Temple street; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; thurs. 7.45 p.m.

Wesleyan Reform, Willenhall road; Rev. T. Whitehouse; 6 p.m.; Mon. & wed. 7.30 p.m.

Schools

The Grammar School was founded in 1515 by Sir Stephen Jenyns knt. a native of this town & alderman of the city of London, who vested it, in trust in the Company of Merchant Taylors, in London, & endowed it with the manor of Rushocke, in Worcestershire; Sir William Congreve bart. the eminent military engineer & inventor of the “Congreve” rocket; John Abernethy & Pitt, the historian, were educated here: in 1864 there were only 44 scholars in the school, but the number of pupils is now 161: the school was reorganized by the Endowed School Commissioners in 1874 & school buildings, in the Early Tudor style, from designs by Messrs. Giles & Gough, architects, of London, situated in the western suburb of the town, apart from the manufacturing district & in the midst of rural scenery, were erected at a cost of about £25,000 & opened in 1875: they comprise a great hall, writing room, several large class rooms, laboratory, dining hall, lavatories & dormitories; the site, including the quadrangles & cricket & football grounds, is 9 acres in extent: in 1895 chemical & physical laboratories & lecture rooms were provided: the school has three scholarships of £60 yearly, tenable at either of the universities; two of these were granted by the Merchant Taylors’ Company & the third was founded in memory of the late William Warner esq. for many years a governor of the school, by the munificence of his brother, Thomas Warner esq.: the school is managed by a body of 12 governors, J. H. Hichens M.A., F.G.S., F.C.S. formerly head of the science department of Cheltenham College; Burdett-Contts (University) Scholar, Oxford, Scholar of Queen’s College, Oxford.

Wolverhampton Municipal School of Science & Art, Lichfield street, was established in 1853, with the object of encouraging an improved taste in design of articles produced at the several manufactories of the district: the building is in the Classic style.

Blue Coat Charity School. North street, the oldest charity school in the town, was founded about 1696 & is supported by the yearly contributions of the benevolent, aided by numerous legacies & donations: it was rebuilt in 1881 at a cost of £6,000, including site: 6 boys & 8 girls are educated, clothed & maintained; 30 are also clothed & educated only: the annual income is £400.

Higher Grade School, New Hampton road east, erected in 1894 at a cost of £14,500 for boys & girls, & has a large lecture theatre, chemical & physical laboratories, art & cooking rooms &c.; the school will hold 372 boys & 252 girls; average attendance, 239 boys & 193 girls.

SCHOOL BOARD

The Wolverhampton School Board, formed November 28, 1870, consists of 13 members, & occupies premises in Stafford street, erected in 1885, at a cost, including site, of £5,100; there are at present seven schools under the control of the board, besides a day industrial school, formerly the ragged school; the total amount expended by the board in erecting & enlarging schools up to 1895 is £68,800; with provision for 5,782 children & an average attendance for 1894 of 5,025. Offices, Stafford street; the board meets the first friday in each month at the offices, at 5 p.m.

BOARD SCHOOLS

Brickkiln street, built in 1878 & enlarged in 1894, for 321 boys, 260 girls & 286 infants; average attendance, 275 boys, 256 girls & 198 infants.

Dudley road, erected in 1873, for 317 boys, 318 girls & 270 infants; average attendance, 299 boys, 312 girls & 276 infants.

Monmore Green, erected in 1871 , for 283 boys, 224 girls & 230 infants; average attendance, 287 boys, 202 girls & 176 infants.

Redcross Street, erected in 1873, for 425 boys, 359 girls & 310 infants; average attendance, 409 boys, 366 girls & 309 infants.

Walsall Street, erected in 1895, for 250 boys, 250 girls & 324 infants; average attendance, 229 boys, 168 girls & 218 infants.

Willenhall road, built in 1875, for 260 boys, 230 girls & 240. infants; average attendance, 204 boys, 191 girls & 219 infants.

NATIONAL SCHOOLS

All Saints’, Steelhouse lane, erected in 1894, at a cost of £3,500, for 320 boys, 320 girls & 400 infants; average attendance, 160 boys, 290 girls & 253 infants.

St. Andrew’s, Coleman street, for 157 boys, 141 girls & 226 infants; average attendance, 159 boys, 141 girls & 226 infants.

St. George's, Bilston street, for 429 boys & girls & 56 infants; average attendance, 241 boys, 67 girls & 57 infants.

St. George's (branch), Commercial road, erected in 1866, for 142 girls & 120 infants; average attendance, 124 girls & 80 infanta.

St. James’s, Horseley Fields, for 192 boys, 156 girls & 129 infants; average attendance, 164 boys, 134 girls & 134 infants.

St. James’s (branch), Alma street, for 162 girls & 88 infants; average attendance, 136 girls & 83 infants.

St. John’s, Cleveland street, built in 1831, for 307 boys, 317 girls & 225 infants; average attendance, 328 boys, 201 girls & 99 infants.

St. Jude’s, Riches street, erected in 1872 & enlarged in 1894, for boys, girls & infants; average attendance, 250 boys & girls & 132 infants.

St. Luke’s, flower Villiers street, erected in 1861 & enlarged in 1893, for 263 boys; 210 girls & 158 infants; average attendance, 263 boys, 210 girls & 150 infants.

St. Mark’s, Darlington street, erected in 1849, for 209 boys; 114 girls & 178 infants; average attendance, 213 boys, 120 girls & 180 infants; new schools are now (1895) being erected in Humber road.

St. Mary’s (mixed & infants), Stafford street, erected in 1843, for 351 mixed & 130 infants; average attendance, 345 mixed & 101 infants.

St. Paul’s, Merridale street, for 248 boys, 232 girls & 264 infants; average attendance, 248 boys, 232 girls & 255 infants.

St. Peter’s, St. Peter’s walk, for 350 boys, 290 girls & 192 infants; average attendance, 260 boys, 240 girls & 150 infants.

St. Stephen’s (infants), Springfield, erected in 1880, for 212 children; average attendance, 191.

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

St. Joseph’s, East street, built in 1868, for 286 boys & girls & 260 infants; average attendance, 196 boys & girls & 230 infants.

SS. Mary & John's, Snow hill, built in 1861, for 260 girls & 192 infants; average attendance, 246 girls & 219 infants; conducted by Sisters of Mercy.

St. Mary’s, Cobden street, built in 1855, for 126 girls & 100 infants; average attendance, 118 girls & 101 infants.

St. Patrick’s, Littles lane, for 263 boys & girls & 258 infants; average attendance, 234 boys & girls & 228 infants; conducted by Sisters of Mercy.

SS. Peter & Paul’s, for 240 girls & 203 infants; average attendance, 177 girls & 126 infants; conducted by Sisters of Mercy.

Wesleyan, Darlington street, erected in 1868, for 300 boys; 225 girls & 175 infants; average attendance, 253 boys, 201 girls & 153 infants.

Orphan Asylum, William Lees esq. J.P. chairman; Walter Hamblett, sec.

Industrial (formerly Ragged School), converted into its present form at a cost of £1,200; it will hold 140 children; average attendance, 85.

Kelly's Directory of Staffordshire (1896)

Surnames Found in Wolverhampton

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Jones1,7302.26
2Smith1,3231.73
3Williams7971.04
4Evans7851.02
5Davis6070.79
6Taylor5610.73
7Edwards4830.63
8Turner4640.61
9Hughes4430.58
10Hill4350.57
11Davies4090.53
12Walker4050.53
13Griffiths3960.52
14Price3780.49
15Brown3710.48
16Lewis3650.48
17Ward3560.46
18Thomas3410.44
19Morris3380.44
20Green3350.44
21Cooper3350.44
22Owen3260.43
23Roberts3030.40
24Richards2890.38
25Perry2880.38
26Cox2640.34
27Whitehouse2570.34
28James2560.33
29Robinson2550.33
30Morgan2500.33
31Rogers2480.32
32Hall2440.32
33Jackson2310.30
34Johnson2290.30
35Harris2250.29
36Lloyd2120.28
37Powell2080.27
38Bennett2070.27
39Mason2070.27
40Martin2060.27
41Phillips2060.27
42Bailey2030.26
43Moore1960.26
44Wood1940.25
45Foster1890.25
46Cartwright1830.24
47Webb1800.23
48Butler1770.23
49Wilkes1760.23
50White1750.23
51Aston1720.22
52Wright1710.22
53Collins1680.22
54Howell1680.22
55Baker1660.22
56Gough1650.22
57Clark1630.21
58Weaver1630.21
59Yates1620.21
60Clarke1610.21
61Fisher1610.21
62Lee1600.21
63Harper1590.21
64Cook1540.20
65Hart1540.20
66Thompson1520.20
67Fletcher1520.20
68Barnett1460.19
69Blakemore1450.19
70Pugh1440.19
71Wilson1420.19
72Carter1410.18
73Allen1400.18
74Pearson1400.18
75Bradley1400.18
76Walton1400.18
77Harrison1330.17
78Walters1330.17
79Ford1320.17
80Parkes1270.17
81Hayward1260.16
82Matthews1250.16
83Rowley1230.16
84Reynolds1220.16
85Stokes1210.16
86Horton1210.16
87Bate1210.16
88Stanley1180.15
89Shaw1170.15
90Gibbons1170.15
91Hadley1160.15
92Holmes1150.15
93Birch1150.15
94Westwood1130.15
95Haynes1120.15
96Southall1070.14
97Porter1050.14
98Lees1050.14
99Dunn1030.13
100Blower1010.13