Tynemouth Genealogical Records

Tynemouth Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Holy Trinity West, Tynemouth Baptism Registers (1896-1897)

Baptism registers are the primary source for birth documentation before 1837, though are relevant to the present. They record the date a child was baptised, their parent's names, occupations, residence and more.

Christ Church, Tynemouth Baptism Registers (1711-1821)

Baptism registers record the baptism of those born in and around Christ Church, Tynemouth and were subsequently baptised in an Anglican place of worship. They are the primary source of birth details before 1837, though are useful to the present.

Tynemouth Baptism Records (1601-1733)

A searchable database containing transcriptions of the baptism registers of Tynemouth. These records detail relationships between parents and their children and may detail where they lived and how they made a living.

Tynemouth Baptism Records (1703-1734)

A book containing a transcription of the baptism registers of Tynemouth. Baptisms are the primary source for birth documentation before 1837. They may record the date a child was baptised, their parent's names, occupations, residence and more.

Tynemouth Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Christ Church, Tynemouth Marriage Registers (1813-1837)

Details on those who married at Christ Church, Tynemouth between 1813 and 1837. Information given may include parent's names, ages, marital status, abode and more.

Tynemouth Marriage Records (1607-1733)

A searchable database containing a transcription of the marriage registers of Tynemouth. These records may help trace a family as far back as 1607.

Tynemouth Marriage Records (1703-1734)

A printed register documenting marriages at Tynemouth. They may list residence, marital status and witnesses.

Tynemouth Marriage Records (1607-1703)

A book containing a transcription of the marriage registers of Tynemouth. Church marriage registers are the primary source for marriage documentation before 1837. They may record the bride and groom's residence, the groom's occupation, parent's names, marital status and witnesses.

Tynemouth Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Tynemouth Burial Registers (1703-1734)

Burial registers record burials that occurred at Tynemouth. They are the primary source documenting deaths before 1837, though are useful to the present. Details given may include the deceased's name, residence, age, names of relations, cause of death and more.

Christ Church, Tynemouth Burial Registers (1607-1703)

Burial records for people buried at Christ Church, Tynemouth, detail the deceased's name, residence and age from 1607 to 1703.

Tynemouth Burial Records (1607-1733)

A searchable transcript of burials recorded at Tynemouth. These records essentially record deaths in and around Tynemouth between 1607 and 1733. Details may include the age of the deceased, their residence and name of relations.

Tynemouth Burial Records (1703-1734)

A printed register recording burials in the churchyard of Tynemouth. These records essentially record deaths in and around Tynemouth between 1703 and 1734.

Tynemouth Church Records

Tynemouth Parish Registers (1607-1897)

Documentation for those baptised, married and buried at Tynemouth. Parish registers can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Tynemouth Parish Registers (1601-1733)

Prior to civil registration in 1837, the parish registers of Tynemouth are the most common place to turn for details on births, marriages and deaths.

Tynemouth Parish Registers (1607-1734)

Baptism, marriage & burial records transcribed from the registers of Tynemouth presented in the form of a printed book.

Durham Diocese Bishop's Transcripts (1700-1900)

Browsable images of summaries of registers of baptisms, marriages and burials.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

Tynemouth Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1881 British Census (1881)

The 1881 census provides details on an individual's age, residence and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows for searches on multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Tynemouth Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Diocese of Durham Probate Index (1527-1858)

An index to surviving wills, bonds and inventories proved by the Bishop of Durham's consistory court. The index contains name, occupation, residence, various dates and financial details.

North Country Wills (1383-1558)

Transcripts of several hundred wills, contains an index to people named within.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (PPV) (1384-1858)

A index to testators whose will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. They principally cover those who lived in the lower two thirds of Britain, but contain wills for residents of Scotland, Ireland, British India and other countries. A copy of each will may be purchased for digital download.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (Subscription) (1384-1858)

An index and digital images of PCC wills, available on a subscription basis.

Newspapers Covering Tynemouth

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette (1873-1904)

Local news; notices of births, marriages and deaths; business notices; details on the proceedings of public institutions; adverts and a rich tapestry of other local information from the Sunderland district. Every line of text from the newspaper can be searched and images of the original pages viewed.

Shields Daily Gazette (1855-1904)

A searchable newspaper providing a rich variety of information about the people and places of the South Shields district. Includes obituaries and family announcements.

North & South Shields Gazette (1855)

A newspaper containing shipping intelligence, local news and family announcements.

Morpeth Herald (1854-1948)

A local newspaper including news from the Morpeth district, business notices, family announcements, legal & governmental proceedings, advertisements and more.

Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury (1846-1872)

This fully searchable newspaper will provide a rich variety of information about the people and places of the Newcastle upon Tyne district. Includes family announcements.

Tynemouth Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Tynemouth Cemeteries

Northumberland Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Northumberland's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Northumberland Monumental Inscriptions (1700-1985)

An index to vital details engraved on 1000s of gravestones and other monuments across the county of Northumberland.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Mausolea and Monuments (1500-Present)

Profiles of several hundred mausolea found in the British Isles.

Tynemouth Directories & Gazetteers

Ward's Directory Northumberland Towns (1936)

A detailed directory of towns in the North East. The street directory is essentially a census of heads of households.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1921)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1914)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1894)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1890-1938)

A collection of directories detailing the history, agriculture, topography, economy and leading commercial, professional and private residents of Northumberland.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

England & Wales Criminal Registers (1791-1892)

This collection lists brief details on 1.55 million criminal cases in England and Wales between 1791 and 1892. Its primary use is to locate specific legal records, which may give further details on the crime and the accused. Details may include the accused's age, nature of crime, location of trial and sentence. Early records can contain a place of birth.

Tynemouth Taxation Records

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Red Book of the Exchequer (1066-1230)

A compilation of records from the Court of the Exchequer primarily dealing with taxes and land. These records are in Latin.

Index to Death Duty Registers (1796-1903)

An index to wills and administrations that incurred a death duty tax. The index can be used to order documents that give a brief abstract of the will and details on the duty. It can be used as a make-shift probate index.

Testa De Nevill (1198-1251)

An account of knights' fees and serjeanties in the reigns of Henry the Third and Edward the First.

Tynemouth Land & Property Records

Northumberland Catholic Documents (1665-1799)

Contains a register of Roman Catholic estates in Northumberland and the correspondence of Miles Stapylton, a Catholic from a gentry family.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem (1236-1291)

Abstracts of records detailing the estates and families of deceased tenants from the reigns of Henry III and Edward I.

Red Book of the Exchequer (1066-1230)

A compilation of records from the Court of the Exchequer primarily dealing with taxes and land. These records are in Latin.

Tynemouth Occupation & Business Records

Durham & Northumberland Mining Images (1844-Present)

Photographs and other images of Northumberland & Durham collieries.

Collieries of The North (1869-1991)

Profiles of collieries in the north of England, with employment statistics, profiles of those who died in the mines and photographs.

Folk Archive of The North East (1694-1950)

A searchable database of artifacts relating to the history of music in Northumberland.

Northern Mining Disasters (1705-1975)

Reports of mining distastes, includes lists of the deceased and photographs of monuments.

Smuggling on the East Coast (1600-1892)

An introduction to smuggling on the east coast of England, with details of the act in various regions.

Tynemouth School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Tynemouth

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Tynemouth Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Northumberland Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Northumberland's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Tynemouth Military Records

Wilkinson's Bombing (1941)

A history of the worst bombing in the North East England during World War II. Contains photos, memories of the survivors, extracts relating to the disaster and much supplementary data.

Gateshead Roll of Honour (1914-1920)

A scrapbook of newspaper clippings and photographs of WWI soldiers from the Gateshead area.

4th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers (1908-1918)

A detailed history of the battalion in the early 20th century. It includes photos, biographical details, battle reports and more.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

Tynemouth Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Alien Arrivals in England (1810-1869)

Details on over 600,000 non-British citizens arriving in England. Often includes age and professions. Useful for discerning the origin of immigrants.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Tynemouth Histories & Books

Wilkinson's Bombing (1941)

A history of the worst bombing in the North East England during World War II. Contains photos, memories of the survivors, extracts relating to the disaster and much supplementary data.

North Tyneside Memories (1880-Present)

A collection of over 700 personal memories concerning the North Tyneside area. Also contains several photograph collections.

Cholera Inquiry Commission (1854)

A report into the causes which have led to, or have aggravated, the late outbreak of cholera in the towns of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Gateshead and Tynemouth.

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Tyne and Wear Photos & Images (2000 BC-2000)

A database of over 15,000 images relating to the Tyne & Wear area. It includes postcards, photos, paintings, ceramics, monuments and more.

Biographical Directories Covering Tynemouth

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Tynemouth Maps

Maps of Northumberland (1616-1920)

Digital images of maps covering the county.

Collery Maps of The North (1807-1951)

A number of maps of northern England with the locations of collieries plotted.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Tynemouth Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Tynemouth Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

The pleasant marine villa of Tynemouth, famous for its monastery, founded by Oswald, king of Northumberland, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. It was plundered by the Danish rovers in three several descents and expeditions. The first was at the end of the eighth century, the second in the reign of King Ethelred, under Hinquar and Hubba; and the third in the reign of King Athelstan. The defenceless monks on the descent of Hinquar and Hubba, fled with terror to their church for safety; but they were fatally mistaken, the brutal Danes set fire to the structure, reducing the whole, together with the trembling religious, to ashes. This crime, however, did not long remain unpunished, their sovereign, King Ethelred, and his father-in-law, Offa, king of Mercia, roused at the atrocious deed, united their forces, drove them in confusion to their ships, and a storm arising soon after, they were driven on the rocks, and almost every soul of them perished.

This sacred fabric lay in ruins till the reign of Edward the Confessor, when Tonstan, Earl of Northumberland, from a motive of ambition rather than of piety, rebuilt and endowed it for black canons, and dedicated it to St Mary and St. Oswin, the remains of the latter having been discovered under the ruins.

This religious house preserved its independency from the time of King Oswald till the descent of William the Norman, when it was degraded to a cell, being first made subject to Benedict Biscop’s foundation at Ginwy; after which to Bishop Carilepho’s at Durham; and lastly to St. Alban’s in Hertfordshire. This was done by three governors or earls of Northumberland, Walteof, Albecie, and Robert Mowbray. Waltcof pretended it was an unfit place for devotion, by its being situated on a frightful precipice, and a noisy tumultuous shore; but in reality it was to erect a fortress within its precincts, by the order of his sovereign, who was wholly regardless of religion. Robert Mowbray’s motive was of a meaner kind, being no other than a grudge he bore to the Bishop of Durham, and a desire of mortifying him by that arbitrary act; but he afterwards took sanctuary at that very altar which he thus dishonoured, for treason; by which all his past honours were buried in oblivion, and all his future hopes destroyed, and 230 fiefs, left him by his uncle the bishop of Constance, forfeited.

From undoubted records it appears that the Priory of Tynemouth possessed the royalties of no fewer than 27 villas in the county of Northumberland alone, besides several others in the counties of Durham and York. Henry the Eighth, however, stripped it of all its valuable possessions in the year 1539; when Robert Blakeney, prior, with fifteen monks and three novices, surrendered the monastery of Tynemouth. Henry however conferred pensions upon the expelled religious. Its annual revenues, separated from St. Alban's, were valued at its suppression, at 396l. 10s. 5d. The site of the priory and most of the lands were granted in the fifth of Edward the Sixth to John Dudley, duke of Northumberland; but by his attainder, in the succeeding reign, they reverted to the crown, in which they remained in the tenth of Queen Elizabeth.

On its being converted to a fortress, it was called Tynemouth Castle; indeed from its lofty situation, built on rocks of a great height, and almost perpendicular to the sea, it seems by nature to be formed for a place of strength, and accordingly we find at an early period that it was fortified against the occasional depredations of pirates, and of the still more formidable invasions of the Danes and Scots. During the Civil Wars this place was again converted into a fortress, and was besieged and taken by the Scots in the year 1644. Thirty-eight pieces of ordinance, and great store of arms, ammunition, and provisions, fell into their hands. The garrison were allowed to march out with their baggage, and obliged to submit to all the injunctions of the Parliament, who ordered 5, 000l. to repair it, and the works at New castle, the town walls, bridge, and garrison; and Colonel Henry Lilburn being made governor of it, afterwards declared, with the lieutenant-colonel, and most of the garrison, for the King; on the news of which at New castle, Sir Arthur Haslerigg immediately marched against them from that town, of which he was governor, and storming the castle, put all those found in arms to the sword. Lilburn being slain, his head was cut off and fixed on a pole.

The priory is built with reddish stone, and seems to be the work of different periods; many of the arches being circular, and some of them pointed. The whole appears to have been highly finished and very magnificent. The chief remains are those of the church, at the east end of which is a small but extremely elegant chapel, or oratory. The church once served as a parish church; but being much decayed, and the parishioners in the Civil Wars being debarred the liberty of free resort to it, another was begun in the year 1659, which was afterwards finished and consecrated by Bishop Cousins, in 1668. Many families continue to bury in the old cemetery, although there is a burial-place at the new church.

The manor of Tynemouth at this time belongs to the Duke of Northumberland; but the site of the monastery is the property of the crown, and was held under a lease by Colonel Henry Villars, formerly governor of Tynemouth, who obtained permission to erect a light-house, and to receive one shilling for every English, and sixpence for every foreign ship anchoring in the harbour of Shields; which it is said produces annually about eighty pounds. Many buildings have been pulled down by Mr. Villars for the purpose of erecting barracks, a light-house, his own house near it, and other edifices.

The light-house, for the direction of ships on the coast, is situated on the north-east side of the castle. It is a lofty building, has an oil-light, and is considered one of the best light-houses on the coast. Close by the light-house is a battery of heavy ordinance, with mortars for shells, for the defence of the shipping.

In the year 1783 government resumed the possession of Tynemouth Castle, making it a depot for arms and stores; when a fine park of artillery and a quantity of ammunition was lodged in a new building, erected in the castle-yard for the purpose; in doing this, however, the magnificent entrance, which had been for ages the chief ornament of the castle, was entirely destroyed; and afterwards rebuilt in a contemptible style of architecture, over which barracks are fitted up for the soldiers.

The village of Tynemouth consists of one very wide and airy street, and some smaller ones, and contains several good houses, most of which are let in the summer to those who resort here for pleasure or sea-bathing. The number of houses, according to the late returns, was 829, and of inhabitants 3, 856, viz. 1, 386 males, and 2, 470 females, of whom 462 were returned as being employed in trade anti manufacture.

The Tyne at this place is not above seven feet deep at low wafer, and though the channel is good from hence to Newcastle, a sand lies across the mouth of it, styled the Bar, with dangerous rocks about it, called Black Middins; but to prevent ships running on them by night there are lighthouses set up and maintained by the Trinity-house at Newcastle. It has several salt-works; but its greatest article of trade is coals, of which upwards of 770, 000 chaldrons are sent to London only, besides other places.

North Shields, a township in this parish, so called from its northern situation upon the river Tyne, and being a shield or shelter for the shipping. In the time of King Edward the First it was so small that it consisted only of six cottages, inhabited by fishermen: it is, however, now an extensive and populous town; wide and airy streets being built in every direction; and terminating at the west end by an assemblage of buildings, under the general name of Milburn Place, north-eastward of which are two handsome squares, called Dockwray Square and Toll Square, and new streets are rapidly advancing. The parish church, which has been lately rebuilt, stands about half a mile north from the river, and is a neat edifice, with a fine peal of bells in a square tower. North Shields likewise contains five dissenting meeting-houses, and two Methodist chapels.

The theatre is a good building, and is at present conducted by Mr. Stephen Kemble.

The harbour is large and commodions, being about two miles in length, and in which about 2000 ships can ride at anchor.

With the daily increasing population of the town, the trade also keeps pace, and may vie even with that of Newcastle, upwards of 400 vessels loading annually at this port. It has also a well-supplied market on Wednesday, and is situated 279 miles from London, and consists, according to the late population act, of 894 houses, and 7, 280 inhabitants, viz. 2,972 males and 4, 308 females, of whom 1, 843 were returned as being employed in trade and manufacture.

A little below the village is a garrison called Clifford’s Fort, which in the year 1044 was taken by the Scots in the reign of King Charles the First. — It had in it five pieces of ordinance, arms, powder, and some prisoners; and nine Scotchmen were killed on this occasion. It is a strong and handsome stone building, well mounted with cannon; and forms a powerful defence against any hostile attempt to destroy the shipping in the harbour. In this fort is the low light, which, corresponding with another on the top of the bank, serves as a guide to ships entering the harbour.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

TYNEMOUTH is a municipal and parliamentary borough, comprising within its boundaries North Shields, Chirton, Cullercoats and Preston; and is also a township, parish, watering place and union town, about 1 mile east-by-north from North Shields, in the Tyneside division of the county, east division, of Castle Ward, Castle West petty sessional division, county court district of North Shields, rural deanery of Tynemouth, archdeaconry of Northumberland and diocese of Newcastle. The parish of Tynemouth embraces the townships of Chirton, Cullercoats, Monkseaton, Murton, North Shields, Preston, Tynemouth and Whitley; Chirton, Cullercoats, Monkseaton, Whitley and North Shields with Preston.

Tynemouth municipal borough, incorporated in 1849, find confirmed in 1850 by 13 and 14 Vict. c. 42, consists of the townships of North Shields, Cullercoats, Tynemouth, Preston and Chirton, and was originally divided into four wards; but in 1889 the borough was divided into six wards, viz. Tynemouth West, Tynemouth East, Shields North, Shields South, Percy and Collingwood. The town council also acts as the urban sanitary authority, exercising the powers conferred by the Public Health Act, 1875 (38 and 39 Vict. c. 55). The parliamentary borough is co-extensive with the municipal borough, and returns one member to Parliament.

The town, pleasantly seated on a promontory, consists of numerous streets, chiefly running from east to west, the principal being Front street, a wide thoroughfare leading from the Castle to the Green and St. Saviour’s church; but the town has been considerably extended northwards, including the formation of a crescent with gardens in front, facing the sea; from this point a wide Road called “the Grand Parade” leads across Tynemouth Links by the foreshore to Cullercoats: the whole coast hereabouts is beset with rocks, one group of which, called " the Black Middens,” immediately below the town, is particularly dangerous. The Prior's Haven, an inlet south-east of the town, being sheltered by an amphitheatre of rocks, forms a good bathing place, to which many people resort during the season. Warm, cold, and shower sea-water baths have been established at the haven, and the beach is well supplied with bathing machines. The Aquarium and Winter Garden, situated on the sea banks, between Tynemouth and the quaint fishing village of Cullercoats, was erected at a cost of nearly £120,000. For particulars of Tynemouth, union, see North Shields.

On the promontory at the mouth of the Tyne is a battery called the. “Spanish Battery,” and near to it is a statue of Admiral Lord Collingwood, who was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 26th September, 1748. The North Pier, situated at the end of Pier Approach road, forms, a portion of the extensive works constructed during 1889 and subsequent years by the River Tyne Commissioners. Both this and the South Pier at South Shields were designed by the late Mr. Walker, and were begun in the year 1856, one on each side of the entrance to the river, for the protection of vessels from the prevalent and destructive gales, varying from north-east to south-east, as well as to facilitate the removal of the bar: each pier is formed of rubble stone and a superstructure of concrete and built stone work, the lower and larger portions of which were fixed by divers: the length of the superstructure of the north pier is 2,954 feet, beyond which the submerged portion extends for 300 feet: upwards of 3,000,000 tons of stone, exclusive of lime and cement, have been used in the construction of these piers: from their exposed position and the frequency of rough, seas, the work was attended with great difficulty, and was necessarily slow, but the whole was completed in 1803 at a cost of £1,854,659. The North Pier is a favourite promenade for the inhabitants of and visitors to Tynemouth.

Tynemouth Priory is an ecclesiastical parish, formed April 16th, 1861, from the parish of Christ Church.

The church of the Holy Saviour, a short distance north-west of the town, and erected in 1839-40, is a building of stone, consisting of chancel and nave and a western tower with pinnacles and spire, and containing one bell; there are 650 sittings. The register dates from the year 1861. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £400 with residence, in the gift of the Duke of Northumberland K.G. and held since 1881 by the Rev. Herbert Sawyer Hicks M.A. of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge, hon. canon of Newcastle, surrogate, and chaplain to Her Majesty’s Forces at Tynemouth Castle.

The Catholic chapel, dedicated to Our Lady and St. Oswin, and erected in 1889, is a building of red pressed bricks, with stone dressings, in the Early English style, from designs by Messrs. Dunn and Hansom, of Newcastle-on-Tyne: there are sittings for 180 persons. There are also Congregational and Wesleyan chapels.

At the extreme end of the rocky promontory stand the remains of the ancient Priory, now surrounded by the buildings and fortifications of the Caste; this fortress, captured in 1644 by the Scots and partially dismantled, was repaired and strengthened by the Parliament on the breaking out of the Civil War, Sir R. Hazelrigge being appointed governor: in 1782 it underwent extensive repairs and alterations, in the course of which various Roman remains were disinterred, including fragments of columns and other sculptures, and a votive altar with the inscription “I.O.M.AEL. RVFVS. COH. IIII. LINGONVM, " from which it has been inferred that this was a military station, occupied by the 4th Cohort of the Lingones: an inscribed tablet was also found, conjectured to have belonged to a temple appropriately erected on this storm-beaten cliff to the God of the Winds: at the time the repairs alluded to above were made, the towers and turrets of the Castle were taken down; the gateway and some of the massive walls are still standing, but the place is now only a barrack, the ancient Priory grounds forming a barrack-yard, partially occupied by turf-covered powder magazines and piles of shot; on the north side of this space stands a lighthouse 62 feet in height, and 128 feet above the level of the sea, its light being visible at a distance of 20 miles.

The Benedictine Priory of SS. Mary and Oswin was founded in the time of William I. by Waltheof, Earl of Northumberland, on the site of an ancient church, erected about 627 A.D. by Edwin, King of Northumbria, and rebuilt by St. Oswald, his sucessor; the early monastery was repeatedly wasted and eventually destroyed by the Danes, but was refounded by Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland in 1090, as a cell to the Abbey of St. Albans. The body of St. Oswin, the martyr king of Deira, who died August 20,651, tad been brought hither from Wilfardesdune, near Gilling, in Yorkshire, in 792, and buried in St. Oswald’s church; the remains were afterwards transferred to Jarrow, but in 1110 were re-translated to Tynemouth, and the adjacent country for a space of one mile around his shrine received the privileges of sanctuary; de Mowbray, dying in 1106, was interred in St. Alban’s abbey, but the rebuilding of the priory was continued, and completed in mo. In 1093 Malcolm Canmore, King of Scotland, and Edward his son, were, buried here; Eadward I. visited the convent in 1298, and in 1303 his queen and second wife, Margaret of France, lodged here; in 1312 Edward II. with his favourite, Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall, was a guest at the priory on Ascension Day, and his queen, Isabella, came as a visitor in 1322; in the reign of Edward III. David, King of; Scots, taken prisoner at Neville’s Cross, October 13, 1346, by Queen Philippa, was brought here on his way to Bamburgh Castle, and honourably entertained by the prior; in this reign also John, a learned monk of Tynemouth, wrote a chronicle called “The Golden History;” one of the most distinguished of the priors was Thomas de la Mare, who succeeded to that office about 1341, and who, during his priorate, expended the sum of £864 on the monastic buildings; in 1349 he became Abbot of St. Albans, and died in 1396; he was buried in the, abbey church, where there is a magnificent Flemish brass to his memory, now deposited in the chantry of Abbot Wheathampstead, who was also prior of Tynemouth from 1400 to 1420: the monastery was surrendered to the Crown, 12th January, 1539, by Robert Blabeney, then prior, and 18 monks, the value of its property being estimated at £537, and its revenues at £706 yearly; 62 ozs. of gold and 1,827 ozs. of silver plate were taken by the royal officers, the six bells removed to London, and the lead stripped from all the roofs: of the conventual library, one volume, a Latin psalter, is now among the Cotton MSS. at the British Museum.

The buildings originally comprised the priory church, which consisted of a nave of nine bays, 126 feet long, with aisles and western towers, transepts, 79 feet from north to south, choir of six bays with aisles and presbytery, central tower, and a small eastern Lady chapel about 22 by 13 feet; the width of the nave, excluding the aisles, was 26 feet, and of the choir, similarly measured, 31 feet; the whole eastern arm formed the conventual church, the nave being parochial: on the south side, in a line with the transept, were the chapter house and the dormitory, forming the eastern inclosure of the cloister garth, the west side being shut in by the refectory, and the south by the guest hall and various offices: the whole length of the church was about 270 feet; a great part of the structure was pulled down by Col. E. Villiers in 1665, but there still exist some portions of the Norman west front, the two western bays of the nave, and the bases of several of the nave piers; but the principal remains consist of the eastern gable and part of the south side of the choir, of exquisitely light and graceful Early English work; the east end has three elegant lancets, and above these is an oval between two small lancets; the lower range of windows on the south side are round-headed, the tipper tier are lancets, and from between each pair springs a portion of the vaulting; the walls below are arcaded and include tre-foiled sedilia; at the extreme end is the diminutive Lady chapel, 22 feet by 13 feet, entered by a doorway beneath the east window of the choir; it was erected by the Percies before 1336, and about 1850 was restored by the late Duke of Northumberland for the use of the parish; the roof is vaulted, with sculptured bosses at the intersection of the ribs, and there are canopied recesses at the east end: a portion of the priory grounds on the south side of the castle yard was long used as a cemetery, but was finally closed by Order in Council, October 28, 1856: the arms of the priory were-gules, 3 ducal crowns or; 2 and 1.

The area of the township is 1,189 acres; rateable value, £80,699; the population in 1871 was 19,326, in 1881, 22,548 and in 1891, 23,678, which includes 584 officers and inmates in the workhouse, and 118 in the barracks and Cliffords forts; the population of Holy Saviour, Tynemouth Priory, in 1891 was 3,063; the area of the municipal and parliamentary borough is 4,303 acres; the population in 1871 was 40,640, in 1881, 44,118 and in 1891, 46,588, viz:-Chirton, 13,066; Cullercoata, 1,620; North Shields, 6,046; Preston, 2,128 and Tynemouth, 23,678.

Places of worship, with times; of services. Church of the Holy Saviour, Rev. Canon Herbert Sawyer Hicks M.A. vicar & surrogate; Rev. Henry C. Newbery M.A. curate; 8.30 & 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.; daily, 11 a.m.

Our Lady & St. Oswin Catholic, Front street, Rev. Geo. Edward Howe, priest; mass, 8.45 & 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; daily mass, 8 p.m.; holidays of obligation, mass, 8.45 a.m.

Congregational, Front street, Rev. Saml. Pearson A.T.S.; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wednesday, 7.30 p.m.

Wesleyan Methodist, Front street, Rev. Edward H. Simpson; 10.45 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 7.30 p.m.

School Board.

Established Jan. 16, 1871, consists of 13 members, of which number Whitley contributes 2; bye-laws were framed in 1871 & 1882.

Clerk, John W. Lambton; offices, Howard st. N. Shields.

Attendance Officers, John Henry Hogg, Percy Main; William Priestman, 10 Hopper street, North Shields; George Hogg, 26 Little Bedford street; W. C. Foster, 82 Linskill st. N. Shields & W. Towns, Bedford st.

Drill Officer, Henry Baker, East Percy st. North Shields.

Priory National School (mixed), built in 1860, for 460 children; average attendance, 325.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1894)

Surnames Found in Tynemouth

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Smith6761.44
2Thompson5101.09
3Brown4861.04
4Taylor4490.96
5Scott4490.96
6Johnson4330.92
7Robson4320.92
8Hall3880.83
9Wilson3700.79
10Bell2990.64
11Anderson2860.61
12Storey2670.57
13Dixon2650.56
14Hunter2640.56
15Young2530.54
16Richardson2450.52
17Robinson2370.50
18Armstrong2370.50
19Turnbull2340.50
20Patterson2180.46
21Watson2130.45
22Dunn2110.45
23Clark1980.42
24Nicholson1970.42
25Gray1960.42
26Reed1950.42
27Harrison1910.41
28Carr1910.41
29Graham1880.40
30Charlton1830.39
31Miller1780.38
32Henderson1710.36
33Wood1680.36
34Davison1670.36
35Stephenson1610.34
36Walker1590.34
37Simpson1590.34
38Atkinson1530.33
39White1510.32
40Gibson1480.32
41Foster1440.31
42Marshall1350.29
43Dawson1350.29
44Campbell1310.28
45Dodds1230.26
46Hedley1200.26
47Burn1180.25
48Rutherford1170.25
49Lee1160.25
50Forster1100.23
51Wilkinson1090.23
52Cook1080.23
53Mason1080.23
54Pearson1070.23
55Elliott1040.22
56Wright1030.22
57Ferguson990.21
58Johnston980.21
59Mather950.20
60Hogg940.20
61Grant930.20
62Turner920.20
63Robertson910.19
64Stewart910.19
65Davidson910.19
66Tate910.19
67Jackson900.19
68Potts900.19
69Baker880.19
70Purvis880.19
71Murray870.19
72Cooper850.18
73Sharp850.18
74King840.18
75Wallace840.18
76Spence840.18
77Williamson830.18
78Reid810.17
79Oliver800.17
80Lambert790.17
81Jones770.16
82Todd770.16
83Green760.16
84Arkley760.16
85Martin750.16
86Chater750.16
87Brunton740.16
88Morrison730.16
89Black730.16
90English720.15
91Moore710.15
92Chambers710.15
93Ward700.15
94Collins700.15
95Craig700.15
96Joyce700.15
97Fenwick700.15
98Donkin690.15
99Ross680.14
100Mitchell670.14