Hexham Genealogical Records

Hexham Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Weslyan Chapel, Hexham Baptism Registers (1820-1836)

Records of baptism for Weslyan Chapel, Hexham between 1820 and 1836. Details include child's name, parents' names and dates of birth and/or baptism.

Ebeneezer Independents, Hexham Baptism Registers (1787-1837)

Records of baptism for Ebeneezer Independents, Hexham between 1787 and 1837. Details include child's name, parents' names and dates of birth and/or baptism.

Cockshaw Catholic Church, Hexham Baptism Registers (1753-1832)

Records of baptism for Cockshaw Catholic Church, Hexham between 1753 and 1832. Details include child's name, parents' names and dates of birth and/or baptism.

Catholic Church, Hexham Baptism Registers (1737-1826)

Records of baptism for Catholic Church, Hexham between 1737 and 1826. Details include child's name, parents' names and dates of birth and/or baptism.

Hexham Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Hexham Marriage Registers (1540-1837)

The Marriage registers of Hexham, document marriages 1540 to 1837. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status and residence.

Hexham Marriage Index (1766)

Marriage records from people who married at the church between 1766 and 1766.

Hexham Marriage Index (1578-1821)

Brief notes on marriages that occurred at the church between 1578 and 1821.

Durham Diocese Bishop's Transcripts (1700-1900)

Browsable images of summaries of registers of baptisms, marriages and burials.

Hexham Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St Mary's Catholic, Hexham Burial Registers (1833-1929)

Records of burial for people buried at St Mary's Catholic, Hexham between 1833 and 1929. Details include the deceased's name, residence and age.

Abbey, Hexham Burial Registers (1684-1688)

Burial registers record burials that occurred at Abbey, Hexham. They are the primary source documenting deaths before 1837, though are useful to the present.

Hexham Burial Registers (1579-1859)

Records of burial for people buried at Hexham between 1579 and 1859. Details include the deceased's name, residence and age. Some records may contain the names of relations, cause of death and more.

Hexham Cemetery Registers (1866-1903)

Extracts from a register recording burials at Hexham Cemetery.

Hexham Church Records

Hexham Parish Registers (1540-1973)

The parish registers of Hexham are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths. Their records can assist tracing a family as far back as 1540.

Durham Diocese Bishop's Transcripts (1700-1900)

Browsable images of summaries of registers of baptisms, marriages and burials.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

Northumberland Catholic Documents (1665-1799)

Contains a register of Roman Catholic estates in Northumberland and the correspondence of Miles Stapylton, a Catholic from a gentry family.

Hexham & Newcastle Catholic Diocese (2000-Present)

Photographs and profiles of Catholic churches in the Diocese.

Hexham Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1881 British Census (1881)

The 1881 census provides details on an individual's age, residence and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows for searches on multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Hexham Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Diocese of Durham Probate Index (1527-1858)

An index to surviving wills, bonds and inventories proved by the Bishop of Durham's consistory court. The index contains name, occupation, residence, various dates and financial details.

York Peculiar Probate Records (1383-1883)

Digital images, indexed by testor's name, of 28,716 wills, administrations, inventories and other probate documents. The records can shed light on an individual’s relations, possessions, land holdings, legal agreements and more. They cover various jurisdictions throughout the north of England.

York Prerogative & Exchequer Court Probate Index (1688-1858)

An index to 263,822 wills, administrations and other probate documents proved by an ecclesiastical court in York. The index included the testor's name, residence, year of probate, type of document and reference to order copies of the referenced document(s.).

York Prerogative & Exchequer Court Probate Index (1267-1500)

An index to 10,195 wills, administrations and other probate documents proved by an ecclesiastical court in York. The index included the testor's name, residence, occupation, will & probate year, language, type of document and reference to order copies of the referenced document(s.).

Newspapers Covering Hexham

Northern Echo (1870-1900)

Britain's most popular provincial newspaper, covering local & national news, family announcements, government & local proceedings and more.

Northumberland and Durham Advertiser (1855)

A short-lived regional newspaper covering news in Northumberland and Durham.

North & South Shields Gazette (1852-1858)

A record of births, marriages, deaths, legal, political, organisation and other news from County Durham and Northumberland. Original pages of the newspaper can be viewed and located by a full text search.

Northern Star (1838-1852)

A chartist newspaper published in Leeds that focused on affairs in Northumberland, Yorkshire and Lancashire. The paper focuses on politics, but does contain a limited number of family announcements

Northern Liberator (1837-1840)

A chartist paper published at Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The paper covered working class issues.

Hexham Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Hexham Cemeteries

Hexham Cemetery Registers (1866-1903)

Extracts from a register recording burials at Hexham Cemetery.

Cemetery, Hexham Cemetery Records (1859-1903)

An index to burials at Cemetery, Hexham. The index includes the name of the deceased, the date of their death or burial and their age.

Northumberland Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Northumberland's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Northumberland Monumental Inscriptions (1700-1985)

An index to vital details engraved on 1000s of gravestones and other monuments across the county of Northumberland.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Hexham Directories & Gazetteers

Bulmer's Directory of Hexham (1886)

A history, geology and geography, with details on the government, trades and commerce.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1921)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1914)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1894)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1890-1938)

A collection of directories detailing the history, agriculture, topography, economy and leading commercial, professional and private residents of Northumberland.

Northumberland Misc Records (1570-2005)

A wide collection of records, particularly those created by the government and church, such as electoral rolls, court of plea records, petty sessions and parish records.

Northumberland Eyre Roll for 1293 (1293)

Transcriptions of pleas brought before a court. They largely concern land disputes.

Home Office Prison Calendars (1868-1929)

Records of over 300,000 prisoners held by quarter sessions in England & Wales. Records may contain age, occupation, criminal history, offence and trial proceedings.

Central Criminal Court After-trial Calendars (1855-1931)

Over 175,000 records detailing prisoner's alleged offences and the outcome of their trial. Contains genealogical information.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

Hexham Taxation Records

Northumberland Northern Division Poll Book (1841)

A list of those who voted in the election, stating their residence and for who they voted.

Tithe Apportionments (1836-1856)

An index to 11,000,000 parcels of land and property, connected to digital images of registers that record their owner, occupier, description, agricultural use, size and rateable value.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Red Book of the Exchequer (1066-1230)

A compilation of records from the Court of the Exchequer primarily dealing with taxes and land. These records are in Latin.

Hexham Land & Property Records

Northumberland Northern Division Poll Book (1841)

A list of those who voted in the election, stating their residence and for who they voted.

Northumberland Catholic Documents (1665-1799)

Contains a register of Roman Catholic estates in Northumberland and the correspondence of Miles Stapylton, a Catholic from a gentry family.

Tithe Apportionments (1836-1856)

An index to 11,000,000 parcels of land and property, connected to digital images of registers that record their owner, occupier, description, agricultural use, size and rateable value.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Hexham Occupation & Business Records

Durham & Northumberland Mining Images (1844-Present)

Photographs and other images of Northumberland & Durham collieries.

Collieries of The North (1869-1991)

Profiles of collieries in the north of England, with employment statistics, profiles of those who died in the mines and photographs.

Folk Archive of The North East (1694-1950)

A searchable database of artifacts relating to the history of music in Northumberland.

Northern Mining Disasters (1705-1975)

Reports of mining distastes, includes lists of the deceased and photographs of monuments.

Smuggling on the East Coast (1600-1892)

An introduction to smuggling on the east coast of England, with details of the act in various regions.

Hexham School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

National School Admission & Log Books (1870-1914)

A name index connected to digital images of registers recording millions of children educated in schools operated by the National Society for Promoting Religious Education. Records contain a variety of information including genealogical details, education history, illnesses, exam result, fathers occupation and more.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Hexham

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Hexham Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Northumberland Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Northumberland's most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Hexham Military Records

4th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers (1908-1918)

A detailed history of the battalion in the early 20th century. It includes photos, biographical details, battle reports and more.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls (1914-1920)

Index and original images of over 5 million medal index cards for British soldiers It can be searched by individual's name, Coprs, Unit and Regiment. Due to the loss of many WWI service records, this is the most complete source for British WWI soldiers

Hexham Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Alien Arrivals in England (1810-1869)

Details on over 600,000 non-British citizens arriving in England. Often includes age and professions. Useful for discerning the origin of immigrants.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Hexham Histories & Books

Victoria County History: Northamptonshire (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Tyne and Wear Photos & Images (2000 BC-2000)

A database of over 15,000 images relating to the Tyne & Wear area. It includes postcards, photos, paintings, ceramics, monuments and more.

A History of Northumberland (1066-1890)

Two volumes detailing the history and geology of Northumberland and some of its parishes.

North-East Diary (1939-1945)

A chronicle of happenings in the counties of Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire relating to the war in Europe. Contains much detail on ship building.

Northumberland Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in Northumberland.

Biographical Directories Covering Hexham

Who's Who in Northern Mining (1852-1910)

Abstract biographies of people connected with mining in the North of England.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Hexham Maps

Maps of Northumberland (1616-1920)

Digital images of maps covering the county.

Collery Maps of The North (1807-1951)

A number of maps of northern England with the locations of collieries plotted.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

Tithe Apportionments (1836-1856)

An index to 11,000,000 parcels of land and property, connected to digital images of registers that record their owner, occupier, description, agricultural use, size and rateable value.

Parish Maps of Britain (1832)

Maps of parishes in England, Scotland and Wales. They are useful in determining which parish records may be relevant to your research.

Hexham Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Hexham Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

Hexham is a market town, situated on an eminence, near a rivulet, called Hexbold, which sometimes overflows suddenly. It is a town of great antiquity: the most learned antiquaries believing it to be Roman, and give it the name of Axclodunum or Uxclodunum; importing the same thing as the Celtic, or ancient British word Ucheledunum, or high situation. Mr. Horseley is, however, of opinion that it is the Roman Epiacum, or Ebchester of Camden; and that Brough on the Solway-sands in Cumberland was their Axclodunum, and the station of their Cohors prima Hispanorum.

This town is not incorporated, but governed by a bailiff and the jury of the manor. It had a monastery once, founded in the year 1112, with liberties so large as procured it the name of a shire; and by an act of Parliament in the reign of Henry VIII. it was of itself made a country-palatine, it was also the see of a bishop in the year 674, but the diocese was so harassed and ruined by the Danes, that no man would accept the bishopric, so that in the year 883 it was united to Lindisfarne.

The church was raised by workmen brought from Italy, and is said to have exceeded in beauty and elegance every other in the land, no part of which, however, now remains. The present church bears innumerable marks of magnificence, and contains many ancient tombs, and is attributed to its first prior. The architecture is a mixture of Saxon and Gothic. This church possessed the privilege called sanctuary, till taken away by Henry VIII. but the stool of peace is still preserved here. Whoever took possession of it was sure of remission, and its privilege extended a mile from the church, in four directions, the extent of which was marked by a cross, and heavy penalties were levied, with the utmost severities of the church, with excommunication, on whoever should dare to violate the sanctuary. In the choir was a beautiful oratory, now- converted into a pew. On the screen at the entrance of the choir, are some strange monastic paintings, called the Dance of Death. The interior ornaments of the church are highly finished in the Gothic taste; the pillars clustered, but heavy. In the vault are several Roman altars, &c. that have been used in the walls and ceilings; which supports the idea of a Roman station having occupied this spot.

At the west end of the church are the remains of the Priory. It was a spacious quadrangular building with an adjourning cloister. The refectory is now perfect, and serves as a room for public entertainment; it is spacious, with a roof of oak work. The remains of the cloisters shew them to have been elegant, richly embellished with pierced work of fruit and foliage. This, monastery contained a prior and regular canon.; of the order of St. Augustine, who at the time of the dissolution amounted to 14, and had a revenue of 122l. 41s. 1d. per annum.

In the year 1296 the town and priory were burnt by the Scots, and in the reign of Edward III. 1346, it was pillaged by David, king of Scots, who entered the borders by Liddel Castle, with 40, 000 men.

There are two ancient towers in Hexham, one of which is used as a court or sessions-house, and was anciently an exploratory tower, and belonged to the bishops and priors of Hexham: the other which is situated on the top of the hill towards the Tyne, is of remarkable architecture, being square containing very small apertures to admit the light, and having a course of corbels, projecting a long way from the top, which seem to have supported a hanging gallery, and bespeak the tower not to be at present near its original height. The founder of these places are not known.

Among the remains of ancient structures is a gateway of Saxon architecture, leading to the priory; indeed every part of the town displays ruined castles, Roman altars, inscriptions, monuments of battles, &c.

The streets are in general narrow and ill built; the market place however, which is a large square, is well built and paved: it stands in the center of the town. On the south side is a market-house, on piazzas or stone pilasters, erected for the use of the town by the late Sir Walter Blacket, Bart. In the middle is a large fountain, with a reservoir under it of free-stone, erected at the charge of the inhabitants of that part of the town. Two markets are held here weekly, on Tuesdays and Saturdays, and two annual fairs, on the 5th of August, and 8th of November. A little to the eastward of the marketplace is a grammar-school, founded by Queen Elizabeth, in the year 1598.

This town, in the year 1571, was annexed to the county of Cumberland; but only in civil matters: for its ecclesiastical jurisdiction is not the same with the rest of the county, it being still a peculiar belonging to the archbishop of York; and the vulgar still call the neighbouring county Hexamshire.

Hexham is situated 285 miles from London, and consists of 487 houses, and 3, 427 inhabitants; viz. 1, 500 males and 1, 927 females, of whom 515 were returned as being employed in trade and manufacture.

The neighbourhood of this town is particularly pleasant, the cultivated vale spreading itself on every side, painted with ail the happy assemblage of woods, meadows, and corn lands, through which flows the river Tyne (the northern and southern streams having united, forming upon the valley various broad canals, by the winding of its course). At the conflux of these rivers lies the beautiful retirement of Nether Warden, defended from the northwest by lofty eminences, and facing the valley towards the east, hallowed to the churchmen, as being the retirement of St. John of Beverley, a bishop of Hexham, in so distant an age as 685. A little farther, and opposite to Hexham, on an eminence, stands the church of St. John Lee, beneath whose site the banks lor near a mile are laid out in agreeable walks, formed in a happy taste, appertaining to the mansion of the Jurin family, a modern building seated at the foot of the descent, and fronting towards Hexham, having a rich lawn of meads between it and the river; from thence the vale extends itself in breadth, and is terminated with a view of the town of Corbridge. The hills which arise gradually from the plain on every hand are well cultivated, and own the seats of many distinguished families.

Near Hexham, on the plains called the Levels, a remarkable and bloody battle was fought, between the houses of York and Lancaster, in the year 1461, wherein the former were defeated, chiefly by the extraordinary bravery and conduct of John Nevill, Lord Montacute, who was for that reason created Duke of Northumberland. This defeat, which followed in the train of many other calamities, rendered the cause of Queen Margaret entirely desperate, as the cruelties practised upon all her adherents rendered it very dangerous to befriend her. After some months concealment, the king (Henry VI. ) was taken prisoner; and the unfortunate queen, with her son, retired to Flanders.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

HEXHAM, anciently “Hextoldesham,” and at an earlier period “Halgutstadt,” is an extensive parish and an ancient market union town and head of a county court district. The ancient Hexhamshire comprised the parishes of Hexham, Allendale and St. John Lee, 12 miles long and nearly 6 in breadth, and constituted a regality, county palatine and diocese, until the reign of Elizabeth, when by Act of Parliament, 14 Eliz. (1571), it was united to the county of Northumberland. The parish of Hexham is divided into the townships of Middle Quarter, Low Quarter, High Quarter and West Quarter. The ancient town of Hexham is pleasantly seated on a lofty plateau near the south bank of the river Tyne, here crossed about half a mile south by a handsome stone bridge of nine main arches, with three smaller ones on the south side, which serve for relief in case of floods; the town is 20 miles west from Newcastle, 36 from Carlisle and 279 from London, in the Hexham division of the county, Tynedale petty sessional division, southern division of Tindale ward, rural deanery of Hexham, archdeaconry of Northumberland and diocese of Newcastle. The town is not incorporated, but it is governed by a Local Board of Health, formed in 1853, consisting of nine members. Quarter sessions are held at Midsummer. The usual courts leet and baron, and a court of pleas for debts to any amount, are held at Easter and Michaelmas: courts baron for small debts and copyhold business are held quarterly. The Newcastle and Carlisle section of the North Eastern railway has a station near the town, on the north side, giving access to all parts, including the west coast of Scotland. Hexham is also the terminus of a branch of the North British railway, which, extending up the valley of the North Tyne, passes through extensive districts of coal, ironstone and limestone, and joins the main line of that company, from Carlisle to Edinburgh, at Riccarton Junction, thus affording communication with Scotland to the north, and also by a branch with Rothbury and Morpeth. The ascent to the town on the north side is most precipitous, and its aspect, from the grouping of the lofty houses, gives it, at a distance, the appearance of a fortified place: the streets, irregularly built, are mostly narrow and confined, with the exception of Beaumont street, Hencotes, Battle Hill and Priest Popple; the last three form one long street along the Newcastle and Carlisle road: on the south side the town is dominated by the hills which shut in this side of the fertile valley of the Tyne; towards the north the terrace sinks abruptly into the level ground which extends between it and the river, beyond which rise the lofty hills overlooking the further bank. The town is lighted with gas supplied by a company whose works are in Old Burn lane, and is supplied with water from the Ladle springs, from which the water is conveyed to the town in pipes on the gravitation system, under the management of the Local Board.

There is probably no sufficient reason to doubt that the site now occupied by Hexham was a place of settlement at a very early period. Close by have been discovered burial grounds of pre-Roman date, containing stone-lined graves with skeletons, urns inclosing burnt human remains, and other pottery; stone implements have also been met with in the vicinity, and in 1836 a large quantity of bronze implements was discovered at Farnley Scar, near Corbridge. There are also strong grounds for concluding that it was a place of importance during the period of the Roman occupation; its position is just such as the Romans would have chosen or adapted, and the crypt of the Saxon church, still extant, is well known to be almost entirely constructed of Roman stones, two of which bear inscriptions, and others have been found to be richly ornamented: in 1725 a Roman altar was found here; two others were met with in the town in 1864, and in September, 1881, Mr. C. C. Hodges, architect, the author of a magnificent work on the priory church, published in 1888, found beneath the floor of the slype, adjoining the south transept, a monumental slab, 9 by 3 ½ feet, and probably of the 2nd century, carved with the figure of a soldier on horseback, armed with a shield and bearing a standard, and riding over a fallen foe; below, in a recessed panel, is an inscription indicating the burial of Flavinus, standard bearer of the troop of Candidus, in the ala or cavalry division of Petriana, which was composed solely of Roman citizens: in 1885, a centurial stone, also inscribed, was discovered in a 17th century house at Hexham, and it is observable that the earliest chroniclers speak of the place as having been founded by the kings of remote ages, and filled, in their time, with ruins which testified to its ancient splendour and extent. It has, however, been asserted that these and many other Roman remains still existing in the church and various buildings in the town, were transferred from the Roman Corstopitum, west of Corbridge and 4 miles distant, but the best authorities dispute this view, especially as there were several excellent quarries near at hand.

During the period of the Saxon kings of Northumbria, there was fought, in 634, at Denisesburn, near here, but in the parish of Corbridge, the decisive battle of Hevenfelth, in which Oswald, who before the fight reared a cross with his own hand, defeated and slew Ceadwalla: in 674, Egfrid being then king, the erection of the church and Benedictine abbey of Hexham was begun by Wilfrid, Bishop of York, to whom Etheldreda, the queen, gave the whole of Hexhamshire: in 680, Hexham became a bishopric, and was ruled in succession by twelve prelates, Wilfrid himself being bishop from 686, until his death, 12th October, 709; the see was suppressed about 820, and in 883 revived and united to that of Lindisfarne at Chester-le-Street, but the monastery continued under the charge of its abbot. In the Danish invasion of 875-6, the town was desolated and the monastery, save the walls only, was entirely destroyed by fire, including the noble library collected by Bishop Acca (709-40); and in 1832 there was found on the north side of the later nave a bronze vessel containing 9,000 stycas of Saxon kings of Northumbria in the 8th and 9th centuries, and of Eanbald and Wigmund, archbishops of York, which was probably buried at the time of this incursion, and the greater portion of these coins is now in the British Museum; at the close of the 9th century, Hexham with its shire appears to have come into the possession of the see of Durham; in 923 an engagement took place at Corbridge, near here, between the Danish chieftain and the allied forces of Ealdred and Constantine II. king of Scotland, in which the former was victorious, and the monks, who had previously, it seems, returned to Hexham, were in consequence again driven out and dispersed. In 1069, William the Conqueror, marching northward to repel the insurrection of the inhabitants and the Danish invaders, is said to have passed through Hexham, and the shire, after this raid, was transferred to the archbishops of York, and in 1113, Thomas II. then archbishop, refounded the monastery for canons of the order of St. Augustine, and by the assistance of two canons of that order, erected new buildings of wood; and Thurstan, his successor, endowed the convent and in 1114 appointed Asketillus as the first prior, and between this date and 1129 new buildings of stone were erected: David I. of Scotland, previous to the battle of the Standard in August, 1138, had his head quarters at Corbridge, but respected the priory, and in September following, and in 1151, Alberic and John Papaco, the cardinal legates, were successively received here with much ceremony; in 1154, the relics of the ancient bishops were solemnly re-enshrined, and the events of the occasion recorded by AElred, abbot of Rievaux: King John was at Hexham in February, 1201-2, August, 1208, and June, 1212, in search of treasure said to be hidden at Corbridge, and which in 1735 was actually discovered: in 1296 occurred a fierce inroad of the Scots, who, coming to Hexham, burnt alive 200 boys within the grammar school and fired the church, the nave of which and the treasured relics and muniments were utterly destroyed, as well as the monastic buildings, and in the next year came Sir William Wallace with his army, whose leader, however, gave the canons his personal protection: Edward I. confirmed to the priory the estates, the title deeds of which had been destroyed by the invaders: to Edward II. the town and county of Hexham twice furnished contingents for his wars with Scotland, and in 1312 and the two following years suffered three more inroads of their northern foes; in 1346, during a like visitation, the church was further despoiled, though the town escaped, and after this the Scottish incursions practically ceased. In 1536, the commissioners appointed by Thomas Cromwell under the Act passed in March of that year for the suppression of all monasteries with an income of less than £200 a year, came to Hexham priory and valued its possessions at £209 14s. 6d. exclusive of the prebend of Salton (Yorks) worth £37 8s. and on 28th September, its suppression having been determined on, the commissioners for the county came to demand its surrender, but the prior and canons, having collected and armed their tenants and neighbours, closed the priory gates and prepared to defend it by force of arms; meanwhile the resistance of the northern counties to the proceedings of Henry VIII. had roused the insurrection known as the “Pilgrimage of Grace,” in which the canons and men of Hexham and the members of every religious house from Lincolnshire northwards resolutely Joined, and when, in March 1537, the rising was finally quelled, the Duke of Norfolk, by express command of the king, came to Hexham, where there remained 20 monks; of these a few were pensioned, some turned adrift, and six, it is presumed, including the prior, Edward Jay, were hanged before the gates of the monastery: the site and buildings, and part of the estates, were granted 29th November, 1538, to Sir Reginald Carnaby, who then made the prior’s house his residence and added some buildings, which still retain his arms and the date 1539. In 1761 a serious riot occurred here on the occasion of a ballot for the militia, during which one officer was murdered by the mob, and, the troops being called out, 48 persons were killed and 300 wounded.

The priory church of St. Andrew, as built by Wilfrid and Acca, is said to have been an edifice of great length and height, with aisles, triforium and clerestory, appendant chapels and lofty round towers, and the site was surrounded with a massive wall; but every part of this edifice except the walls perished in the Danish incursion of 875: the stone work was still extant in the middle of the 12th century, but the only portion of the Saxon church now existing is the remarkable crypt, to be subsequently noticed. The church, as now existing, is wholly in the latest Transitional and Early English styles, having been probably rebuilt at the very beginning of the 13th century, and consists of a choir of six bays, with aisles 95 feet long and 51 wide, transept 157 feet long and of somewhat later date, with eastern aisles and a central embattled tower (c. 1245) with a low pyramidal roof and containing a clock, erected in 1887, and 8 bells, dating from 1742 to 1884: an examination of the architectural details of the choir leads to the conclusion that the south side is probably rather earlier in date than the other; the arcades have clustered piers on rectangular bases, the capitals being mostly plain, but some exhibit indications of foliage: these support pointed arches richly moulded and of fine proportions: the triforium consists in each bay of a large semi-circular arch on clustered shafts, inclosing two pointed arches, carried on a single shaft in the centre: the bays are separated by vaulting shafts, which rise from corbels at the base of the openings of the triforium: the interior arrangement of the clerestory presents a feature almost unique, the triplet of arches in each bay being supported on two tiers of shafts one above the other: the original design of the east end, partly rebuilt in 1858, is unknown; some of the original masonry of the lower portion remains, but the arches which opened into the eastern chapels, removed in 1858, have been built up with common rubble; the upper portion, rebuilt in 1828, and again in 1858, is an imitation of the east end of the choir of Whitby Abbey: the choir has a contemporary open timber roof, the principal rafters being moulded and enriched with flatly carved bosses at the intersections; of the oak sedilia (1409-27), with canopies, but four only, deprived of their tabernacle work, now remain, and are preserved in the vestry, the partition between which and the church is now ornamented with remains of one of the beautiful 15th century side screens of the choir, consisting of richly canopied niches, inclosing paintings of archbishops and bishops, and above, under the cornice, is a series of seven shields of arms: the wooden rood screen, standing between the eastern piers of the tower, is one of the finest of the kind now existing, and was erected by Thomas Smithson, prior (1491-1524), as appears from a monogrammic inscription on the cornice; it is coved out on either side so as to form a spacious loft, and on the west side exhibits a central arch with two arches on either side filled with exquisite flamboyant tracery; between the arches are shafts carrying the fan-traceried groined canopy; the lower space is panelled in 16 divisions, containing painted figures of bishops of Hexham and others; the inclosure of the loft above has 21 pinnacled niches, but the canopies and the figures they once held have been destroyed; above these niches have long been fixed a series of 24 panels with traceried heads, brought here from different parts of the church; some of these contain scenes from the life of Our Lord, others illustrate the “Dance of Death,” and the remainder display figures of saints and bishops: on the east side the loft has been reconstructed, and the front is ornamented with painted panels having traceried heads, and also exhibiting figures, some of which can hardly now be identified; the stalls, dating from the early 15th century and originally 38 in number, were despoiled of their canopies and pinnacles in 1740, and further injured in 1858; the greater part of what remains, including the interesting misereres, is now placed against the aisle walls at the east end of the choir, but fragments have been re-used and other portions are still preserved; the choir aisles have pointed quadripartite vaulting, and at the east end of each is a square aumbry, and in the centre of the south aisle a piscina; the ancient “frith stool, " used before the Reformation as a refuge by fugitives seeking the sanctuary of the church, is now placed at the east end of the choir, on the south side of the communion table, but originally stood in front of the first pier from the east on the north side; the upper portion, fashioned from a solid block of close-grained gritstone, is classical in design, and decorated on the flat surface of the top with interlaced ornament within plain lines, and in front with three incised parallel lines following the outline of the seat.

The transepts are similar in their general architectural features to the choir, but differ somewhat in date, the south transept having been erected c. 1215-20, and the north transept c. 1220-30; the former is excessively plain, and in the clerestory the arches are stilted, instead of being supported on two tiers of shafts; at its south end this transept is carried over the slype, which appears inside as a stone platform rising to the capitals of the piers, and approached by a wide stone staircase of 32 steps on the west side, which served as night stairs from the dormitory; a piscina and aumbry remain in the south wall of the aisle and a modern doorway opens to the slype; the north transept shows much progression in style, its mouldings are richer and carved ornament is used in great profusion; the lower portion of the walls, both of the transept and its aisle, is enriched by a deeply-recessed trefoil-headed arcade; the north end is pierced by two tiers of stilted lancets on clustered shafts, and the whole of these are filled with stained glass; in this transept lies a mutilated recumbent effigy of a knight in chain mail, covered with a cyclas, and bearing a shield with, the arms of Devilstone, and has been assigned, with much probability, to Sir Thomas de Devilstone, ob. July, 1297; here also is a similar effigy bearing a shield of the Umfreville arms, and assumed to represent Gilbert de Umfraville, ob. 1307; in this transept is also the upper portion of an altar tomb, retaining the matrix of a brass and curiously recessed sides, and a large slab once containing a label and shields; built across the south end of the aisle, between the wall and the pier, is a segmented moulded arch with a straight-coped wall above; and beneath it a plain altar tomb, c. 1290, on either side of which are remains of canopies and image brackets; the upper part of the tomb is incised with the representation of a vine springing from two grotesque heads at the foot; the straight stem forms a cross, and from it stems with foliage and fruit spread out in a very intricate design: in the aisle of the south transept stands Prior Leschman’s chantry, removed here and reerected in a mutilated and shortened condition in 1858; it consists of an embattled basement of stone, with panelled sides containing rude sculptures, and round the base a series of grotesque figures; upon this was constructed a wooden-panelled chapel, enriched on the exterior with pinnacles and tracery and within with paintings; the small stone altar remains, and beneath it an aumbry; the ceiling is flat and boarded, and has bosses where the ribs intersect: the altar tomb of the prior, which originally adjoined the south side of the chantry, now stands in the chapel of the aisle, and bears his recumbent effigy, with a cowl almost entirely concealing the face; in this aisle is also an ancient pulpit: the organ, a fine instrument, stands above the rood loft, and the front exhibits three clusters of lofty pipes, surmounted by rich tabernacle work, the intervening spaces being similarly treated and finished with a cresting: the font consists of a large and massive circular straight-sided basin on a stem, with engaged shafts of the 13th century: alternating with insertions of quatrefoil dental ornament and stands on a round base; the wood cover is assumed to date from 1725: in the vestry is preserved an ancient alms box: the central tower, supported on pointed arches springing from massive clustered piers, is of two stages; the exterior has flat buttresses at the angles, and the upper stage is arcaded on every side, two arches on each face being pierced for windows: the remaining monuments in the church include a number of portions of Saxon work found in 1854, 1858 and 1874 and comprising fragments of a cross erected to St. Acca, Bishop of Hexham (709-40): a number of grave covers of early date also exist, besides others of the mediaeval period; of the latter, 9 are to deceased canons and were found on the south side of the choir: in the parochial cemetery, to the west of the north transept, was found in 1841 a stone inscribed to “matilda: uxor: phillppi: mercerarii,” and in the church is one bearing the name “iohannes: malherbe:” besides the effigies previously mentioned is one of a lady in & long robe and wimple, c. 1280; and in the churchyard is another of uncertain sex and date: the remains of the nave, 95 feet long, consist only of the lower portion of the south and west walls and a small part of the west end of the north wall, the whole being of the 14th and 15th century: there was a north aisle only and during excavations on the spot in 1881 the rubble bases of two of the piers of the arcade were uncovered: the famous Saxon crypt, discovered in 1725, is entered by a wooden ladder near the south-west pier of the tower and consists of a central chamber or chapel, 13 feet 5 ½ inches long and 7 feet 8 inches wide, with an ante-chapel immediately west of it, a western exit from this and two other passages or exits running parallel to the chapel and then turning north and south and reaching the level of the church floor by steps: the chapel and passages have recesses for lights and the vaulting is either semi-circular or triangular: pieces of stained glass of the 13th century and mediaeval pottery were found in the crypt in 1882: in 1810 the roofs of the church were stripped of their lead and slated; the east end was repaired in 1828; and in 1858 further repairs and alterations of a very extensive character were undertaken, in the course of which nearly all the ancient fittings of the choir were destroyed and the Late Decorated chapels attached to the east end of the choir were wholly removed: in 1869 some restoration of the transepts took place, during which the north doorway, a work in the Renaissance style, erected by the Mercers’ Company, was demolished: the south transept wall was rebuilt in 1878, the roofs repaired in 1887 and the church is now in a generally substantial condition: the above account of the church is derived mainly from Mr. Hodges’ work, previously referred to: the organ was erected in 1866 and is a noble instrument, of great power and sweetness of tone: there are 650 sittings. The register dates from the year 1579. The living is a rectory, gross yearly value £300, without residence, in the gift of Wentworth Blackett Beaumont esq. M.P. and held since 1866 by the Rev. Henry Christopher Barker M.A. of Caius College, Cambridge, hon. canon of Newcastle and surrogate. The Catholic church, at the top of Battle hill and dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin, was erected in 1830 at a cost of £2,500, raised by subscription; the window over the altar is stained. The Scotch church, in Hencotes, erected in 1825, at a cost of £1,300, is a large and plain building at present disused. The Congregational chapel, in Hencotes, was built in the year 1868, in the Early English style, and has nearly 400 sittings. There is ft Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Beaumont street, a United Presbyterian chapel on Battle hill and a Primitive Methodist chapel in Back street. The Cemetery, 1 ½ miles west from the town, was formed in 1858 and comprises 4 acres: it has two mortuary chapels and is under the control of a Burial Board of nine members. The Public hall and corn market was erected in the year 1866 from designs by Mr. J. Johnston, architect, Newcastle, at a cost of £8,000 and is the property of a limited company; it is a building in the Italian style, containing in the right wing a lofty and spacious public hall, holding from 400 to 500 persons, with cloak rooms attached and a board room for the Local Board of Health: in the centre is a large corn market, with glass roof supported on iron pillars, with settling rooms for the use of persons attending the weekly market; also a room used by the Hexham Club: the left wing contains Messrs. Lambton and Co.’s bank and offices occupied by Messrs. R. and W. and J. Gibson, solicitors: the hall is adapted for public entertainments and contains at one extremity a spacious stage, elevated above the level of the room. The Market-place, which is nearly in the centre of the town, though small and of irregular form, is picturesque in effect: on the south side is a covered market with colonnades, erected an 1766, where butter, eggs and poultry are sold, and until 1867 there stood near it on the north side a large “pant" or reservoir, with an octagonal fountain pillar at one end: on the east side of the market-place stands the Moot Hall, a large square embattled tower with a newel staircase at the south-east angle; and on the south side a lofty barrel-vaulted passage way: it was formerly the prior’s court house, and is now used for manor courts and quarter sessions: the market day is Tuesday: it is well supplied with corn and provisions and attended by the neighbouring farmers. A cattle market is held on Tuesdays. Fairs are held annually on the 6th of August for cattle and lambs and on the 9th of November for horses and cattle. A fair is also held on the 25th of March for stock of all kinds and a wool fair on the 2nd of July. There are several charities, principally for the poor and for apprenticing poor boys, amounting in the aggregate to £100 16s. 3d. yearly. The Tynedale Hydropathic establishment, erected in 1878 by a limited company, is a building of stone, comprising drawing, dining, reading and recreation rooms, and stands in its own grounds of 20 acres, in which are excellent bowling greens, and lawns for croquet, tennis &c.; Mr. Frank G. Grant is the present proprietor. This town was once famous for its manufacture of tan leather goods, particularly gloves, of which large quantities were exported annually. Two newspapers are printed and published in Hexham every Saturday morning, one called the “Hexham Courant,” by Joseph Catherall and Co. the other the “Hexham Herald,” by the Hexham Herald Co. (T, Armstrong, manager). In the immediate neighbourhood of the town are many extensive and productive market gardens, where fruit and vegetables are produced in large quantities for the supply of the Newcastle market. There are also extensive nurseries, occupied by Messrs. W. Fell and Co, and Joseph Robson and Son. At Cross bank, 2 miles north, stands the base of an ancient cross, and in Homer’s lane, 3 ½ miles north-west, is another, with part of the shaft. In Hallgate stands the manor office, an ancient rectangular tower, probably built for the defence of the monastery.

Of the monastic buildings of the priory, portions on the east and west side of the cloisters, which were about 100 feet square, are still standing: these include on the east, next the slype, the vestibule of the chapter house, a fragment of graceful Early English work, with its entrance and interior arcading, and a part of the wall of the warming house adjoining it: the north side was formed by the nave wall, in which is a segmental arched recess for carrels; on the west side are the cellars and cellarer’s buildings, with semi-circular rib vaulting, and in the wall facing the cloister garth there are remains of a very beautiful Early Decorated lavatory, e. 1280; the wall surface above the place of the trough being decorated with a series of seven arches, filled with geometric tracery, and surmounted by triangular crocketed heads between the arches are octagonal panelled and crocketed pinnacles, rising from clustered shafts, on figure corbels. Beyond the cloisters on the west side was the prior’s court, surrounded by buildings, which were destroyed by fire in 1818; of the great gateway of the priory, situated at the north end of Cowgate to the north-west of the church, and above which the last prior was hanged, only the arches are now standing; the precinct wall, portions of which are extant, starting from this gate followed the course of Gilligate and Market street, and passing round the east end of the priory church joined St. Mary’s church, which lay to the south-east; continuing on the opposite side it turned south-west and along Hencotes, at the end of which it went north and across the Cowgarth burn to the gateway: the ribvaulted bridge over the burn is still in use; there were other entrances on the east and south.

There were once two other churches here, St. Mary’s and St. Peter’s: of the site of the latter nothing is known; but St. Mary’s stood immediately south-east of the choir of the priory church and was about 150 feet in length and 60 wide, with a nave and aisles; traces of the fabric have been met with. The battle of Hexham, the 10th of the series of engagements which took place during the Wars of the Roses, was fought here on 15th May, 1464, closely following that at Hedgeley Moor. Henry VI. who marched hither from Alnwick Castle, where his adherents had assembled, commanded in person, and with him were the Queen Margaret and Prince Edward, Henry (Beaufort) 2nd Duke of Somerset, the Lords de Ros, Molins, Hungerford and others; the site of the battle, described in the Year Book, 4 Edward IV. appears to have been 2 miles south of the town, between Dukesfield and the Linnells, and on the south side of the Devilswater; but was continued in and through the town, part of which is still called “Battle hill;” the Yorkists, under John, Baron Nevill of Montagu, won a decisive victory; Somerset, being captured, was immediately beheaded in the town, and the other nobles taken prisoners were conveyed to Newcastle and there executed; Henry, with some followers, escaped into Lancashire, and the queen with her son took refuge in Flanders. The manor of Hexham, co-extensive with the tract of land called “Hexhamshire,” which in 1571 became part of the county, was sold in 1587 to Sir John Forster K.B. of Bamborough, and subsequently by marriage descended to the Fenwicks, who disposed of it to Sir William Blackett bart. of Newcastle, from whom it passed, also by marriage, through the Calverley-Blacketts to Wentworth Blackett Beaumont esq. J.P. now lord of the manor and principal landowner. The area of the township is 5,135 acres of land and 81 of water; rateable value, £30,423; the population in 1891 was 5,945, including 170 officers and inmates in the union.

High, Middle and Low Quarters are included in the ecclesiastical parish of Witley.

Petty Sessions are held at the Petty Sessional Court, The Abbey, the first & third Tuesday in every month, at 11.30 a.m. The following places are included in the Petty Sessional Division:-Acomb, Allendale, Aydon, Aydon Castle, Bearle, Bingfield, Blackcarts & Ryehill, Bitchfield, Blackheddon, Broomhaugh, Broomley, Bywell, Cheeseburn Grange, Chollerton, Clarewood, Cocklaw, Cobridge, Dilston, Dukershagg, Eltringham, Espershields, Fallowfield, Fenwick, Fortherley High, Hallington, Halton, Haughton, Hawkwell, Haydon, Healey, Hedley, Heugh, Hexham, Hexham High Quarter, Hexham Low Quarter, Hexham Middle Quarter, Hexham West Quarter, Horsley, Humshaugh, Ingoe, Kearsley, Kirkheaton, Maften East, Maften West, Mickley, Nafferton, Nesbit, Newbrough, Newlands, Newton, Newton Hall, Ouston, Ovingham, Ovington, Portgate, Prudhoe, Prudhoe Castle, Riding, Ryal, Sandhoe, Shotley High Quarter, Shotley Low Quarter, Simonburn, Slaley, Spittle, Stelling, Styford, Thornbrough, Wall, Wallridge, Warden, Welton, Whittington Great, Whittington Little, Whittle, Whittonstall.

Hexham Union

The following parishes are within the union:-Acomb, Allendale, Aydon, Aydon Castle, Bearle, Bingfield, Blackcarts & Ryehill, Broomhaugh, Broomley, Bywell, Chollerton, Clarewood, Cocklaw, Corbridge, Dilston, Dukershagg, Eltringham, Espershields, Fallowfield, Fortheriey High, Hallington, Halton, Haughton, Haydon, Healey, Hedley, Hexham, Hexham High Quarter, Hexham Low Quarter, Hexham Middle Quarter, Hexham West Quarter, Horsley, Humshaugh, Mickley, Nafferton, Newbrough, Newlands, Newton, Newton Hall, Ovingham, Ovington, Portgate, Prudhoe, Prudhoe Castle, Riding, Sandhoe, Shotley Low Quarter, Shotley High Quarter, Simonburn, Slaley, Spittle, Selling, Styford, Thornbrough, Wall, Warden, Welton, Whittington Great, Whittington Little, Whittle, Whittonstall, Wylam.

Board day, every alternate Tuesday at the Board room, at 12.15.

The population of the union in 1891 was 32,809; area 205,857 acres; rateable value in 1893, £257,355.

Places of Worship & times of services:—

St. Andrew’s Church, Rev. Canon Barker M.A. rector; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Thur. 6.30 p.m.

United Presbyterian, Battle hill, Rev. John McKenzie Wilson; 10.30 a.m. &. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6.30 p.m.

St. Mary’s Catholic, Battle hill, Very Rev. Canon John Cooke, priest; 10.30 a.m. & 3 p.m.; Wed. 6.30 p.m.

Congregational, Hencotes, Augustus Julian; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 6.30 p.m.

Free Methodist, Tanners row, Rev. Samuel F. Waterhouse; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7.30 p.m.

Primitive Methodist, Back street; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 6.30 p.m.

United Methodist, Holy Island; 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Wed. 6.30 p.m.

Wesleyan, Beaumont street, Rev, Walter E. Fletcher; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 6.30 p.m.

Schools

The Grammar, at Bankhead, was founded by Queen Elizabeth in 1599, & regulated by a decree of the High Court of Chancery in 1827; it is open to all boys born in the parish; the endowment produces £21 yearly.

A School Board of 7 members was formed Feb. 6, 1874, L. C. Lockhart, clerk to the board.

Board, The Seal, built on a site given by W. B. Beaumont esq. M.P. for 900 children; average attendance, 700.

Bagraw School, West Quarter, was built by subscription in 1830, & was endowed with £9 yearly by the Commissioners of Greenwich Hospital, for which nine poor children are educated at half the fees paid by the other pupils; the school will hold 50 children; average attendance, 40.

St. Mary’s Catholic, Battle hill, built in 1840, for 180 children; average attendance, 190.

Kelly's Directory of Northumberland (1894)

Surnames Found in Hexham

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Robson2593.73
2Dodd1692.43
3Bell1622.33
4Taylor1081.55
5Smith1011.45
6Scott901.29
7Thompson791.14
8Young771.11
9Armstrong751.08
10Charlton711.02
11Dixon711.02
12Pearson701.01
13Forster640.92
14Hamilton600.86
15White580.83
16Hope580.83
17Gibson550.79
18Brown520.75
19Hedley520.75
20Snowball500.72
21Johnson500.72
22Rutherford470.68
23Baty470.68
24Hunter450.65
25Wilson440.63
26Oliver440.63
27Ridley420.60
28Newton410.59
29Coulson410.59
30Purvis410.59
31Watson410.59
32Nixon390.56
33Robinson390.56
34Burn380.55
35Maughan370.53
36Wilkinson370.53
37Walton360.52
38Stokoe350.50
39Ritson340.49
40Moore340.49
41Parker340.49
42Fenwick330.47
43Hall330.47
44Riddle300.43
45Dinning290.42
46Jackson290.42
47Tweddle290.42
48Murray280.40
49Potts280.40
50Ward280.40
51Henderson280.40
52Harrison270.39
53Milburn260.37
54Porteous250.36
55Pigg250.36
56Carr250.36
57Shield250.36
58Urwin250.36
59Nicholson240.35
60Oxley230.33
61Graham230.33
62Stephenson230.33
63Welch230.33
64Williamson220.32
65Bowman220.32
66Oates210.30
67Pattinson210.30
68Clark210.30
69Turnbull210.30
70Ainsley210.30
71Darlington210.30
72Richardson210.30
73McGuire210.30
74Routledge210.30
75Mills200.29
76Dunwoodie200.29
77Ord200.29
78Kirsopp200.29
79Davison200.29
80Herdman200.29
81Turner200.29
82Green200.29
83Walker190.27
84Little190.27
85Salkeld190.27
86Wear190.27
87Wood190.27
88Hogarth180.26
89Hudson180.26
90Middleton170.24
91Waugh170.24
92Alexander160.23
93Elliott160.23
94Bulman160.23
95Bibby160.23
96Lisle160.23
97Carruthers160.23
98Fell150.22
99Hetherington150.22
100Stobbs150.22