Shaftesbury Genealogical Records

Shaftesbury Birth & Baptism Records

England & Wales Birth Index (1837-2006)

An index to births registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of birth certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury Baptism Records (1830-1849)

Records of baptism for people born in and around Shaftesbury between 1830 and 1849. Details include child's name, parent's names and date of birth and/or baptism. Records may also include parent's occupations, residence, place of origin and more.

Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury Baptism Records (1830-1849)

Records of baptism for people born in and around Shaftesbury between 1830 and 1849. Details include child's name, parent's names and date of birth and/or baptism. Records may also include parent's occupations, residence, place of origin and more.

Shaftesbury Baptism Records (1813-1906)

Baptism registers record the baptism of those born in and around Shaftesbury and were subsequently baptised in an Anglican place of worship. They are the primary source of birth details before 1837, though are useful to the present.

Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury Baptism Records (1813-1906)

Records of baptism for people born in and around Shaftesbury between 1813 and 1906. Details include child's name, parent's names and date of birth and/or baptism. Records may also include parent's occupations, residence, place of origin and more.

Shaftesbury Marriage & Divorce Records

England & Wales Marriage Index (1837-2008)

An index to marriages registered throughout England & Wales. This is the only national marriage index that allows you to search by both spouse's names. Provides a reference to order copies of marriage certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St Peters, Shaftesbury Marriage Records (1870-1919)

The Marriage registers of St Peters, Shaftesbury, document marriages 1870 to 1919. Details given on the bride and groom may include their age, father's name, marital status, residence and signature.

St James, Shaftesbury Marriage Records (1850-1899)

Marriage records from people who married at St James, Shaftesbury between 1850 and 1899. Lists an individual's abode, marital status, father's name, age and signature

Shaftesbury Marriage Records (1813-1929)

Marriage registers record Anglican marriages in Shaftesbury. They are the primary marriage document before 1837 and contain the same details as marriage certificates from then on.

Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury Marriage Records (1813-1929)

Marriage registers record Anglican marriages in Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury. They are the primary marriage document before 1837 and contain the same details as marriage certificates from then on.

Shaftesbury Death & Burial Records

England & Wales Death Index (1837-2006)

An index to deaths registered throughout England & Wales. Provides a reference to order copies of death certificates from the national registrar of births, marriages and deaths – the General Register Office.

St Peters, Shaftesbury Burial Records (1980-1989)

Name index linked to original images of the burial registers of St Peters, Shaftesbury. Records document an individual's date of death and/or burial, age and residence. Some records may contain the names of relations, cause of death and more.

St Rumbold, Shaftesbury Burial Records (1920-1989)

Records of burial for people buried at St Rumbold, Shaftesbury between 1920 and 1989. Details include the deceased's name, residence and age. Some records may contain the names of relations, cause of death and more.

Shaftesbury Burial Records (1813-1909)

Burial records for people buried at Shaftesbury, detail the deceased's name, residence and age from 1813 to 1909. Some records may contain the names of relations, cause of death and more.

Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury Burial Records (1813-1919)

Burial records for people buried at Holy Trinity, Shaftesbury between 1813 and 1919. Lists the deceased's name, residence and age.

Shaftesbury Church Records

Shaftesbury Parish Registers (1550-1989)

The parish registers of Shaftesbury provide details of births, marriages and deaths from 1550 to 1989. Parish registers can assist tracing a family back numerous generations.

Shaftesbury Parish Registers (1560-1874)

The parish registers of Shaftesbury are a collection of books essentially documenting births, marriages and deaths from 1560 to 1874.

Dorset Vestry, Poor and other Parish Records (1640-1932)

Original images of Dorset parish records. Including: poor rates, overseers, churchwardens, vestry, incumbents' and other records.

Dorset Parish Apprentices Indentures (1605-1799)

Abstracts of apprenticeship indentures initiated by parishes in Dorset. These records provide details on parents' names and occupations.

Dorset Parish Register Index with Images (1538-1812)

Original images of parish registers, searchable by a name index, covering almost all Dorset parishes.

Shaftesbury Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

Dorset Electoral Registers (1839-1922)

A full name index, connected to original images of the registers. These records list those who were eligible to vote and may give a description of an individual's property.

Dorset Poll Book (1807)

A list of freeholders in the county, with their residence, the name of their tenants and the location of their freehold.

Dorset Hearth Tax Assessments (1662-1664)

Transcriptions of hearth tax records for the county of Dorset.

Dorset Jury Lists (1825-1921)

A name indexed connected to original images of juror lists. These images list Dorset men eligible to serve on juries, by meeting the criteria of being between 21 and 70 years old and possessing enough property to be liable for the poor rate. The records may contain occupations, parish of residence, nature of their property and details of their property.

Shaftesbury Wills & Probate Records

England & Wales National Probate Calendar (1858-1966)

Searchable index and original images of over 12.5 million probates and administrations granted by civil registries. Entries usually include the testator's name, date of death, date of probate and registry. Names of relations may be given.

Early Gloucestershire Probate Index (1540-1660)

An index to Gloucestershire wills from Bristol and Gloucester Diocese.

Dorset Wills and Probate Documents (1565-1858)

An index linked to original images of wills, administrations and inventories proved in Dorset courts. Documents contain much genealogical information.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1649-1660)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Admon Index (1581-1595)

An index to estate administrations performed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The index covers the southern two thirds of England & Wales, but may also contain entries for northerners.

Newspapers Covering Shaftesbury

Sherborne Mercury (1789-1867)

Fully text-searchable articles from a local newspaper covering the Sherborne district. It includes family announcements, obituaries, court proceedings, business notices and more.

Western Morning News (1921-1950)

A politically independent newspaper, covering the affairs of Dorset, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset. It includes family notices.

Western Gazette (1863-1950)

A regional newspaper covering the counties of Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire Hampshire and Berkshire. It covers local and national news, family announcements, business news, legal proceedings and more.

Dorset County Chronicle (1863-1867)

A regional newspaper including news from the Dorset area, family announcements, business notices, advertisements, legal & governmental proceedings and more.

Western Times (1827-1950)

A liberal newspaper covering the counties of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. It includes family notices.

Shaftesbury Obituaries

iAnnounce Obituaries (2006-Present)

The UKs largest repository of obituaries, containing millions of searchable notices.

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

British Medical Journal (1849-Present)

A text index and digital images of all editions of a journal containing medical articles and obituaries of medical practitioners.

Shaftesbury Cemeteries

Dorset Monumental Inscriptions (1200-2000)

An index to vital details engraved on gravestones and other monuments across the county of Dorset.

Dorset Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Dorset' most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

Deceased Online (1629-Present)

Images of millions of pages from cemetery and crematoria registers, photographs of memorials, cemetery plans and more. Records can be search by a name index.

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Mausolea and Monuments (1500-Present)

Profiles of several hundred mausolea found in the British Isles.

Shaftesbury Directories & Gazetteers

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1931)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1927)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1920)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1915)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1911)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key historical and contemporary facts. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions. Also contains a list of residents and businesses for each place.

Dorchester Prison Documents (1782-1901)

Over 60,000 documents relating to prisoners held at Dorchester Prison. The collection includes admission and discharge books and photographs of the latter prisoners.

Dorset Alehouse Licences & Recognizances (1754-1821)

Documents relating to the licensing of alehouses. Contains details on the proprietor, establishment and conditions of the licence.

Dorset Vestry, Poor and other Parish Records (1640-1932)

Original images of Dorset parish records. Including: poor rates, overseers, churchwardens, vestry, incumbents' and other records.

Dorset Vestry, Poor and other Parish Records (1511-1997)

Original images of Dorset parish records. Including: poor rates, overseers, churchwardens, vestry, incumbents' and other records.

Dorset Calendars of Prisoners (1854-1904)

Records listing prisoners tried at assizes or quarter sessions. Details include: names, verdicts, detailed accounts of crimes, occupations, addresses, ages and more.

Shaftesbury Taxation Records

Dorset Tithe Apportion & Maps (1835-1850)

Maps delineating fields in Dorset, which are referenced to documents recording field names, land owners, occupiers, land use and land size.

Dorset Land Tax (1780-1832)

Digital images of 18th and 19th century records that record landowners and their tenants. The taxable value of the land is given, and sometimes a description of the property. These records can be searched by names and place indices.

Dorset Hearth Tax Assessments (1662-1664)

Transcriptions of hearth tax records for the county of Dorset.

Land Tax Redemption (1798-1811)

This vital collection details almost 1.2 million properties eligible for land tax. Records include the name of the landowner, occupier, amount assessed and sometimes the name and/or description of the property. It is a useful starting point for locating relevant estate records and establishing the succession of tenancies and freehold. Most records cover 1798, but some extend up to 1811.

Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures (1710-1811)

An index linked to original images of registers recording apprenticeship indentures. Details are given on the trade and nature of apprenticeship. Many records list the parents of the apprentice.

Shaftesbury Land & Property Records

Dorset Electoral Registers (1839-1922)

A full name index, connected to original images of the registers. These records list those who were eligible to vote and may give a description of an individual's property.

Dorset Tithe Apportion & Maps (1835-1850)

Maps delineating fields in Dorset, which are referenced to documents recording field names, land owners, occupiers, land use and land size.

Dorset Land Tax (1780-1832)

Digital images of 18th and 19th century records that record landowners and their tenants. The taxable value of the land is given, and sometimes a description of the property. These records can be searched by names and place indices.

Dorset Poll Book (1807)

A list of freeholders in the county, with their residence, the name of their tenants and the location of their freehold.

Dorset Jury Lists (1825-1921)

A name indexed connected to original images of juror lists. These images list Dorset men eligible to serve on juries, by meeting the criteria of being between 21 and 70 years old and possessing enough property to be liable for the poor rate. The records may contain occupations, parish of residence, nature of their property and details of their property.

Shaftesbury Occupation & Business Records

Dorset Crew Lists (1863-1914)

A collection of nearly 60,000 documents including crew lists, ship agreements and log books for Dorset. Records may contain information of a sailors birth, life, duties and discipline.

Dorset Parish Apprentices Indentures (1605-1799)

Abstracts of apprenticeship indentures initiated by parishes in Dorset. These records provide details on parents' names and occupations.

Dorset Hemp & Flax Bounties (1782-1793)

Over 3,300 documents relating to bounties offered to farmers by the government to grow hemp & flax.

The Dorsetshire Labourer (1887)

An article describing the life of labourers in Dorset in the 19th century. Includes details on hiring practices and poverty.

Smuggling on the South Coast (1700-1867)

An introduction to smuggling in Dorset & Hampshire.

Shaftesbury School & Education Records

Teacher's Registration Council Registers (1870-1948)

A name index linked to original images of registers recording the education and careers of teachers in England & Wales.

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Dissenting Academy Database (1660-1860)

Histories of schools operated by non-conformist clergy.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Shaftesbury

Victoria County History: Dorset (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Shaftesbury Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

Victoria County History: Dorset (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Dorset Church Monuments (1300-1900)

Photographs and descriptions of Dorset' most illustrious church monuments, often featuring effigies, medieval inscriptions and heraldic devices.

British & Irish Royal & Noble Genealogies (491-1603)

Extensive and impeccably sourced genealogies for British, Irish & Manx royalty and nobility. Scroll down to 'British Isles' for relevant sections.

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Visitation of England and Wales (1700-1899)

Over 600 pedigrees for English and Welsh families who had a right to bear a coat of arms.

Shaftesbury Military Records

Dorset Militia Lists (1757-1860)

An index linked to original images of lists men eligible to serve in the militia. Records may include name, residence, occupation, age, height, marital status, disabilities and family details.

Dorset WWI Memorials (1914-1918)

A list of names found on World War One monuments in Dorset, with some service details.

Dorset WWII Memorials (1914-1918)

A list of names found on World War Two monuments in Dorset, with some service details.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

Shaftesbury Immigration & Travel Records

Dorset Vagrant Passes (1739-1791)

An index linked to original images of documents for vagrants. These records were draw up for poor people who moved to parishes where their presence was unwanted. They contain much genealogical information.

Dorset Convict Transportation Records (1724-1791)

Indentures and other records that recorded the transportation of Dorset men and women to the colonies.

Dorchester Company Emigrants (1623-1628)

Details of individuals who left Dorset for New England.

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

Shaftesbury Histories & Books

Notes and Queries for Somerset and Dorset (1888-1906)

Selected issues of a periodical which contains many historical and genealogical tracts relating to the counties of Somerset and Dorset.

Catholic History in South West England (1517-1856)

A history of Catholicism in South West England with biographies of noted Catholics. Contains details of the Dominican, Benedictine, and Franciscan orders.

Victoria County History: Dorset (1086-1900)

A detailed history of the county's hundreds, parishes and religious houses.

Dorset Church Photographs (1890-Present)

Photographs and images of churches in Dorset.

Dorset Church Histories & Photos (1066-Present)

Short profiles of Dorsetshire churches, containing photographs and bibliographies.

Biographical Directories Covering Shaftesbury

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Church of England Clergy Database (1500-1835)

A database of CoE clergy, giving details of their education of service. Contains references to source documents. Also contains profiles of various church institutions.

Shaftesbury Maps

Dorset Tithe Apportion & Maps (1835-1850)

Maps delineating fields in Dorset, which are referenced to documents recording field names, land owners, occupiers, land use and land size.

Maps of Dorset (1610-1900)

A collection of digitalised maps covering the county.

Ordnance Survey 1:10 Maps (1840-1890)

Maps showing settlements, features and some buildings in mainland Britain.

A Vision of Britain (1190-Present)

A sprawling website setting out and describing the historical divisions of Britain. Also contains countless maps of various sorts. Covers the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man & has fleeting details of other localities.

Ordnance Survey One-inch to the Mile Maps (1945-1947)

High-quality digital reproductions of maps plotting, settlements, roads, natural features and other features in England & Wales.

Shaftesbury Reference Works

England Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in England.

Parish Register Abstract (1538-1812)

Compiled in 1831, this book details the coverage and condition of parish registers in England & Wales.

Building History Research Guide (1066-Present)

A comprehensive guide to researching the history of buildings in the British Isles.

Surname Origins (1790-1911)

A service that provides advanced and custom surname maps for the British Isles and the US.

British Family Mottoes (1189-Present)

A dictionary of around 9,000 mottoes for British families who had right to bear arms.

Shaftesbury Information

Civil & Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction:

Historical Description

This ancient town has received a variety of names from our historians and records. In British it is called Caer Palladow and Caer Septon. In Saxon Septerbyres. By Bede, Mathew of Westminster, and Simeon Dunmcnsis, Schaftesbury. By Brompton, Schaftebyry. In Doomsday Book Sceptesberri. The modern name, Shaston, is an abbreviation of Shaftesbury. The supposed British names of Caer Palladuror Palladow seem to be mere invention, alluding to a Temple of Pallas which some have placed here, though this deity was unknown to the ancient Britons.

Fabulous history attributes a very high antiquity to this town, some will have Rhudubrasius, or Cicuber, Kins; of the Britons, who flourished 940 years before Christ, to have built Palladur, or Caer Septon, wherein he founded three temples, and placed in them flamens, and that where the abbey was afterwards built, stood in Pagan times a temple of Pallas. Holingshead says it was built by Lud, or Ludhurdibras, son of Leil, eighth King of the Britons, who began to reign A. M. 3046, and reigned 29 years. Brompton says it was built by Cassebelan, a British King.

It is celebrated by our historians for the prophecy of one Aquila concerning the change in the British government. Some think this was an eagle, called in Latin aquila; others that it was a man of that name who foretold that the government of Britain, after having been in the Saxon and Norman hands, should return at length to the ancient Britons.

In a note to some verses in Dravton's Poly-Albion, where this town is noticed, it is said that at the building of Caer Septon an eagle, or rather one named Aquila, prophesied of the recovery of the isie by the Britons, bringing with them the bones of Cadwallader from Rome, where he died.

These fabulous accounts may be a presumption of high antiquity, but carry no certainty or information about them.

Camden .says, "It was undoubtedly built by Alfred; for Malmsbury, the historian, has told us that there was an ancient stone in his time, removed out of the ruins of the walls into the Chapter-house of the nuns, which had this inscription— "Anno Dominican Incarnationis Elfredus Rex, fecit hanc urbem DCCCLXXX Regni sui VIII." "King Alfred built this city in the year of our Lord 880, and the 8th year of his reign. Mr. Camden says, "He was more willing to insert this inscription for clearing the truth of the matter, because in all the copies he had seen it is wanting, except one belonging to Lord Burleigh, the then Lord High Treasurer of England." Leland says, "There was an inscription on the right-hand entering the Chapter-house, set up by King Alfred, in knowledge that he repaired Shaftsbury destroyed by the Danes." But he immediately adds, "that the inscription of the remains of which William of Malmsbury speaketh, stode in the waule of St. Mary's Chapel, at the town's end, which chapel is now pulled down." He also says, "this was translated thither from the ruins of a very ancient wall." This town is situated in the northern extremity of the county on the borders of Wiltshire, 16 miles northeast from Sherborne, and 10 north from Blandford Forum. It stands on a very high hill, difficult of access, except on the east. On the south and west you have a very extensive prospect over the counties of Dorset, Somerset, and Wilts. When viewed from the south it appears in form of a bow; St. James's parish lying in a vale on the south side of the hill. The limits of the town only extend to its streets and lanes; but some part of the parish of St. James extends into the adjacent country.

The air is pure and healthy, but the high situation renders it cold and bleak. The buildings are chiefly of stone dug out of the hill. There are, according to the returns under the Population Act, 515 houses and 2159 inhabitants. The soil about the town is sandy, but fertile. On the north, south, and west is the Vale of Blackmoor, a deep country full of pasture, yielding cattle and wood, and .on the east, northeast, and south, a high champaign country abounding with sheep and corn. There were formerly 12 churches in Shaftesbury, viz.1. The Conventual Church of St. Maryand St. Edward. 2. St. Peter, 3. St. Trinity., 4. St. Laurence. 5. St. Martin.6. St. Andrew. 7. St. Rombold's. 8. St. James. 9. All Saints. 5. St. Edward. 6. St. John.7. St. Mary. Leland mentions but four parish churches, possibly because two of them are not entirely in the borough. At present they are in fact reduced to three, which being small, and the towers low, are no great ornaments to the town at a distance.

The trade of Shaftesbury is very inconsiderable, the principal manufactory is the making all kinds of shirt buttons, in which upwards of 4,000 women and children are employed in and about the town. The most inferior sort of which are made at the low price of five pence per gross of twelve dozen, the labourer finding the thread.

On the south side of the town, near which formerly stood the abbey and the church, was a park belonging to the abbey, which still retains the name of Park-Hill. At the east end yet remains part of the wall that inclosed it, which, next the borough, is very strong and high, and embattled and supported by very large buttresses, but lower down, near the Parish of St. James, little more than the ruins of it are to be seen.

In the year 1746, on sinking a saw-pit in a garden between the east end of Park-hill and the passage that leads to the Abbey Green, about four feet deep, was found with some human bones, a gold ring weighing three quarters of an ounce, without any inscription or figure. In 1761 was dug up, on the same hill a stone about two feet square, on which were the arms of the abbey, a cross patonce between four martlets, very finely cut.

To pass over the fabulous accounts in the British age which have been before mentioned, we find no mention of this town under the Romans, nor are there any marks or traces of those people to be found here. It is certain that in the Saxon age it became a place of great note on account of its monastery, and the translation of the body of King Edward hither. King Athelstan fixed here two mints, which in the time of Edward the Confessor were increased to three. In this town King Canutus ended his days, in 1035, and was buried in the old Monastery.

In 1278 and 1294, John Peckham, Archbishop of Canterbury, excommunicated Sir Osbert Gifford, Knt. for stealing two nuns out of the nunnery at Wilton, and absolved him on these conditions : that he should never come into a nunnery or into the company of nuns; that he should for three Sundays together be whipped in his parish church of Wilton, and as many times in the market and church of Shaftesbury; and fast a certain number of months, and not wear a shirt for three years; and not take upon him the habit or title of a knight; but wear apparel of a russet colour till he had served three years in the Holy Land.

In Doomesday Book we have this account of the town : "In Borgo Sceptesberie, tern. Reg. Edw. were 104 houses in the king's demesne. This veil gelded for twenty hides, viz. two marks of silver to the king's huscarles. Here were three minters, each of which paid one mark of silver and 20s. when money was coined. Here are now 66 houses, 38 having been destroyed from the time of Hugh the Sheriff to the present. In that part of the town belonging to the Abbess T. R. E. were 158 houses, now but 111, 47 being destroyed. She had here 157 burgesses, 20 empty dwelling houses, and one garden, val. 65s." Shaftesbury is a very ancient borough, being so styled in Doomsday book. It was formerly incorporated by prescription, and had a mayor and several burgesses. Queen Elizabeth granted the first charter, constituting a mayor, a recorder, 12 aldermen, a bailiff, and a common council. Another was granted by James I. and a third was obtained from Charles II. in the 17th year of his reign, differing very little from that of James I. whereby a mayor was appointed to be chosen annually, the Monday before, and sworn the Friday after Michaelmas, 12 capital burgesses to hold quamdiu se bene gesserint, a recorder and town clerk, to hold durante placito of the mayor, and capital burgess, either of whom may execute his office by a deputy.

This town sends two members to parliament, the first return appear's to have been made on the 25th of Edward I. The right of election is in the mayor and burgesses,and the inhabitants paying scot and lot. The number of voters amounts to 300.

This borough has been remarkable for its venality, of which the following extraordinary instance is mentioned in Mr. Hutchins's History of Dorset: "Sir Thomas Rumbold and Sir Francis Sykest two nabobs, were returned to represent this borough. A petition was presented by Hans Wintrop Mortimer, Esq, complaining that the two sitting members, by themselves and their agents, had been guilty of many gross and notorious acts of bribery and corruption. It appeared in evidence, on the trial of this petition, that money to the amount of several thousand pounds had been given among the voters in sums of twenty guineas a man; and that persons who were intrusted with the disbursement of this money, and who were chiefly the magistrates of the town, devised very singular and absurd contrivances to conceal through what channel it was conveyed to the electors. A person concealed under a ludicrous and fantastical disguise, and called by the name of Punchy was placed in a small apartment, and through a hole in the door delivered out to the voters parcels containing twenty guineas each: after which they were conducted to another apartment in the same house, where they found a second person, called Punch's Secretary, who required them to sign notes for the value received: these notes were made payable to another imaginary character, to whom was given the name of Glenducket. Two of the witnesses swore they had seen Punch through the hole in the door, and that they knew him to be Mr. Mathews, an alderman of the town." The monastery at this place was a nunnery of the Benedictine order, at that time the only one in the church of Rome, and the original of all the rest.— Leland says it was founded by King Ethelbald, and that his brothers Ethelbert, Ethelred, and Alfred, were also considered as founders. Elsewhere he gives this honour entirely to Alfred. Asser Menevensis, who lived about this time, says that Alfred founded by the east gate of Sceftasburg a monastery for nuns, wherein he placed as abbess his own daughter Æthelgeof. Indeed it appears certain that King Alfred was, if not the first, the principal founder, his charter, in Saxon and Latin, is still extant in the British Museum, MS. Hail. 61, and is,' called Testamentum R. Alfredi. The following is, a translation: "I King Alured, to the honour of God and the holy Virgin, and all the Saints, do give and grant for the health of my soul, to the church of Schaftesbury 100 hides of land, viz. in Dunhived and Compton 40 hides, in Henly and Gissig 20, in Tarrent 10, In Irverrle 15, and in Tuntemelle 15, with the men and other appurtenances as they now are, and my daughter Ayleva with the same, she being in an ill state of health, and a nun of the same church'. Witness, &c. W hosoever shall alienate these things may he he for ever accursed of God and the holy Virgin Mary, and all the Saints. Amen." It was first dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, but it lost that name, at least for several ages, upon the translation hither of the body of St. Edward the Martyr, who was murdered at Corfe Castle, 18th March, 978, and first clandestinely buried at Wareham, whence, according to Leland, he was next year, or, as others on better grounds say, three years afterwards, removed to this abbey, by Elpher Duke of Mercia,or St. Dunstan. A. D. 980.

Miracles were soon invented to support the sanctity of his remains; for besides those which are pretended to have been wrought after his first interment, and on his removal to Wareham and hither, he had not lain long before a matron, in the most remote part of England, being lame, the king appeared to her in the night, and ordered her to repair to Shaston to his tomb, and she should be cured, which was accordingly done.

The body was first interred on the north side of the principal altar. In 1101 his tomb was sensibly elevated from the earth, and shewed he was willing to be removed from that place. He appeared in a vision to a holy man, and ordered him to go; to the Abbess of Shaston and tell her he would lie in that place no longer, and that she should relate this to his brother Ethelred. This was done, and the king expressed a great desire to be present at his translation, but being hindered by the wars, he ordered the Bishop of Sherborne, and a prelate, named Elfsinus, and others, to deposit the body in a fit place, after taking it out of the earth. On opening the tomb they perceived a fragrant odour, and taking the reliques out of the tomb, deposited them in a place prepared for them in the Sanctum Sanctorum with the relics of other saints. The body was taken up twenty-one years after it was first entombed.

Of the Abbey or Conventual Church there now remains not the least vestige; but it seems to have stood parallel with the Holy Trinity churchyard, which anciently belonged to it, at the east end of the Abbey, on Park Hill, as appears by bones and coffins found there. It was the glory and ornament of the town, the mother church, and almost the only place of sepulture; there being but one ancient inscription in any of the present churches, which is in St. Peter's, and seems to have been removed hence. It must have been a magnificent building, if we may judge from the traditions the townsmen retain of its largeness and height. Of the Abbey-House little now remains, except part of an ancient house, south of Trinity Church, in which appear two or three very large arches walled up. Though no mention is made of a castle at Shaftesbury, yet there seems to have been one on Castle Green, a little west of St. Mary's, by some called Boultsbury, where the inhabitants have a tradition the old town or city stood. On one side it joins to the town on the east; but on, the, west it terminates in a deep precipice. On t£ie very brow of the hill to the west is a small mount, surrounded on the part that joins the town by a shallow trench, the area of which is about two acres. It might have been a Roman Castrum Exploratorium. there being a very extensive prospect thence of the Vale of Blackmoor and the country adjacent.

The situation of Shaston or Shaftesbury is very singular. The prospect from it is very extensive and beautiful, reaching over great part of Dorsetshire, Wiltshire, and Somersetshire. From Castle green, an eminence to the west of the town, "a vast landscape appears : in front an eminence called Pencliffe Hill, rises with a beautiful wooded summit, bounding the fertile vale of Blackmoor, through which a white road, sometimes losing itself among woodlands, and sometimes traversing verdant pastures, winds westward into the distance. On the left, a fine undulating ridge shelters the vale, while the hills of Mere, in Wiltshire, with Alfred's Tower at the extremity, the Tor of Glastonbury, and the lofty heights of Quantock in Somersetshire, range themselves in the remaining part of the horizon." The town being destitute of springs on account of its elevation, except two wells at the foot of the hills in the parish of St. James, some years ago engines were erected at the foot of the Castle Hill: but these' works, though they raised the water three hundred feet high, fell into neglect, and many of the poor again gained a livelihood by bringing water from a distance, either on their heads or on horses backs from the wells at Gillingham, about a quarter of a mile distant. In consequence of this supply being derived from a different parish, an ancient agreement dated 1662, between the lord of the manor of Gillingham, and the mayor and Burgesses of Shaftesbury, is annually observed on the Monday before Holy Thursday, when a prize besom, or bysant, as it is called, is dressed up: its form resembles that of a May garland, adorned with gold and peacock's feathers. This is carried to Enrnore Green, in the hamlet of Motcombe, as an acknowledgement for the water; and along with it a raw calf's head, a pair of gloves, a gallon of beer, and two twopenny loaves of wheaten bread, which are delivered to the Steward of the Lord of the manor. Latterly two wells have been dug; one of them is an hundred and twenty-six feet deep, and afford plenty of good water. They are let for about 101. a year each, and the water is retailed at about three halfpence or twopence a horse load, and a farthing or a halfpenny a pailful.

Shaftesbury, like most of the towns in Dorsetshire, wears much of the appearance of decay; as the trade carried on is very inconsiderable. It partakes with several other of the towns of the shirt button manufactory. Great improvements were made in 1817 at Shaftesbury, by lowering the very steep hill, and widening the road which led up it on the north west side.

The Rev. James Granger, author of the celebrated "Biographical History of England" was a native of this town; he died in the year 1776.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

SHAFTESBURY, a corporate and market town and municipal borough, on the Wiltshire border, is 102 miles from London, 28 north-east from Dorchester, 22 south-west from Salisbury, 15 east-north-east from Sherborne, 8 east from Sturminster and 12 north-east from Blandford; it is in the Northern division of the county, petty sessional division and union of its name, hundred of Monkton-up-Wimbome, rural deanery of Shaftesbury (Shaftesbury portion), archdeaconry of Dorset and diocese of Salisbury. The town is said to be mentioned as a borough in the Domesday Survey (1086), but was first incorporated, according to Hutchins (Hist. Dorset, 1774, and later ed.), by Queen Elizabeth. The earliest known charter is that of Jas. I. granted in 1604, and confirmed by Chas. II. Under the provisions of the “Municipal Corporations Act, 1835” (5 and 6 Wm. IV., c. 76), the corporation was reformed, and now consists of a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councillors, who also act as the Urban Sanitary Authority. The borough returned two members to Parliament in 23 Edw. I. (1294-5), and continued to do so until the passing of the “Reform Act, 1832” (2 and 3 Wm. IV., c. 45), by which the number was reduced to one, and by the “Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885” (48 and 49 Viet., c. 23), the representation was merged in that of the Northern division of the county. The nearest railway station is Semley, 3 miles north-east, on the Salisbury and Yeovil branch of the South Western railway, opened May 2, 1859, affording communication with Portsmouth, Southampton, London, and also the West and North of England. Shaftesbury is a very ancient town, and is said to be the Caer Palladur of the Britons, its present name being in part derived from the A. S. “Sceaft,” the point of a hill: Roman coins have been found here: an albbey, with a nunnery of the Benedictine order, was established here during the Saxon period: the site has been ascertained, but scarcely any remains of the buildings are now extant: it was, however, once a place of great resort for pilgrims, and is said to have had some of the richest endowments in England. King Edward the Martyr, murdered at Corfe Castle by his mother-in-law Elfrida, A. D. 978, was buried here. King Canute died in Shaftesbury on the 12th November, 1035, and was buried in Winchester. In 1861 a stone coffin, containing a skeleton, and having also therein an abbot’s crosier and gold ring, was discovered whilst some excavations were being made on the site of the old abbey.

Shaftesbury is situated on an eminence, the approach to which is by a steep ascent: its elevation, 700 feet above the sea level, affords it a fine bracing air. The supply of water is derived from a large reservoir underground, pumped by steam power into an upper reservoir, whence the whole town is supplied. The streets are lighted with gas by a company. Some of the houses are very ancient, but the upper portion of the town is modern, and contains a large number of good houses, with excellent shops, hotels, banks and other buildings: many of the old buildings have been replaced by a better class of houses, and the streets have been much improved. St. James', or the lower portion of the town, consists chiefly of small tenements. A little to the south and west from the Holy Trinity church is a delightful promenade called the Park, sheltered from the north winds by a row of trees, partially extending over the walk: the view over the adjacent plains from this spot is most pleasing: this walk is one of the connections between the higher and lower portions of the town, and contains the Russian trophy gun mounted on its carriage ; it has recently been continued by a path called Pine walk to St. John's hill.

The borough formerly comprised parts of the parishes of Holy Trinity, St. Peter and St. James, which, by order of the County Council have been formed into one parish, called Shaftesbury, under “Local Government Act, 1894.”

Here were formerly twelve churches; there are now only three-St. Peter, the Holy Trinity and St. James.

St. Peter, the most ancient of the churches, is a building of stone and stands in the High street, the architecture of which shows that it was built in the latter part of the 15th century: the interior had succumbed to the influence of time to such an extent that it was pronounced unsafe: it has not been in constant use since 1878, and has only been used for service for a few months in the summer of 1886: since then the tower has been thoroughly repaired at a cost of about £700; a further sum of about £250 is still required to complete the work: it has nave and square western tower, which contains a peal of 6 of the sweetest toned bells in this county; they are of great age: this venerable relic of ecclesiastical note is of interest to antiquaries. The register dates from the year 1623.

The Holy Trinity church, in Bimport street, was rebuilt on the old site in 1842, chiefly in the Early English style: it is a handsome specimen of this kind of architecture, and consists of nave, aisles and large north and south galleries, with choir at west end, north and south porches and a square embattled western tower, 100 feet in height, with pinnacles, and contains 6 bells: the splendid organ was presented at the opening of the church by the late George Thomas esq. : it has a good east window, and will seat 834 people. The register dates from the year 1695.

The churchyard of the Holy Trinity contains three handsome avenues of lime trees, shading most of the walks through the burying ground and approaches to the church.

The parishes of Holy Trinity and St. Peter are consolidated. The living is a rectory, average tithe rent-charge £129, gross yearly value £187, net £161, with residence, in the gift of the Earl of Shaftesbury, and held since 1885 by the Rev. Frederick Ehlvers.

The church of St. James, in the liberty of Alcester, which is that part of the old parish of St. James not within the municipal limits, is a handsome structure, chiefly Decorated, of greenstone, with Bath stone dressings, rebuilt in 1866-67, at a cost of £3,350, raised by subscriptions: it has a chancel, nave, aisles and vestry square embattled western tower of 65 feet, with four pinnacles, a clock and 6 bells: the chancel is paved with encaustic tiles: the aisles are divided from the nave by four arches Testing on clustered piers with carved capitals : there are two entrances, one through the base of the tower at the western end and the other by a porch on the north side: the front of the porch is a moulded arch carved with capitals on clustered Purbeck marble shafts, with richly moulded bases: at the east end of the north aisle is an organ: the pulpit is of oak, elaborately carved: a stained memorial window was placed in the chancel in 1884, and there are several other stained windows: the interior is fitted with open benches and will seat 440 people. The register dates from the year 1559. The living is a rectory, tithes commuted at £400, average £296, gross yearly value £297, net value £230, with residence, in the gift of the Earl of Shaftesbury, and held since 1881 by the Rev. Richard Thurlow M.A. of Trinity College, Dublin, chaplain of Shaftesbury union and surrogate.

The parish has, in addition to the churchyard, St. John’s burial ground or Bury Litton cemetery, the site of the old church of St. John’s, all traces of which are now obliterated: this is at about 150 feet above the level of the main part of the parish.

The Society of Friends have a meeting house in St. James's street which has about 100 sittings.

A Congregational chapel was completed in 1858 on the site of the former chapel, erected in 1662: it is a handsome building of Bath stone, supported by four massive Corinthian columns of the same: it will seat from 400 to 500 persons, and the expense, £1,300, was raised by voluntary contributions.

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel, Parsons Pool, erected in 1766, and rebuilt in 1827, will seat 300 persons.

The Brethren meeting house, Salisbury street, erected in 1886, will hold 250 worshippers.

The Town Hall is a handsome edifice, built at the expense of the late Marquess of Westminster: a tower, containing a good clock, was added in 1879 by the corporation, at a cost of £264.

The Temperance Hall, in Bell street, was opened in the year 1878, at a cost of £775 : it is a building of brick and stone, and contains in addition to the offices &c. a spacious hall, 52 feet long by 26 wide, which is used for temperance meetings and lectures and will hold about 500 persons; an ante-room was added in 1883 at a further cost of £60.

The I Company of the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, have their armoury in Bell street.

The trade of the town is derived principally from the supply of the neighbouring agricultural villages, and from the sale of cheese and butter, the produce of the superior grazing land in the vicinity.

The market day is Saturday. A handsome Market-house, 270 feet long, was erected at the sole expense of the late Marquess of Westminster, in which no tolls are taken.

The fairs are held on the Saturday before Palm Sunday, on the last Saturday in August, and 23rd of November, for sheep, cattle, cheese and agricultural produce, and pleasure.

A Clerical Library, for the use of the neighbouring clergy, was established, with the assistance of the late Dr. Bray: this is kept in the vestry-room of Holy Trinity church, under the care of the rector, but of late years is not much used.

A Literary Institute, with news-room and library, was established in 1852, under the patronage of the late marquess of Westminster; in 1894 there were 90 members and 50 lady subscribers; and it is well supplied with newspapers and periodicals, and has a library of about 3,500 volumes, which is now open as a circulating library to other than members.

The Westminster Memorial Cottage Hospital, in the Park road, was built of local stone with Bath stone dressings, at a cost of £2,000, raised by subscription, in memory of the late Marquess of Westminster, and was opened by the Bishop of Salisbury on March 16th, 1874: over the arch of the front entrance is a fine oriel window with cusped heads, and pierced open parapet, and this is surmounted by a gable, in the face of which are the Westminster arms, carved in bold relief: the lower portion consists of convalescents’ room, drug store, bath room, larder, kitchen and scullery; and on the upper floor are two wards, four single wards, and nurses’ rooms: the hospital contains twelve beds, and one bed for accidents was added in 1884: the number of inpatients treated in 1893 was 85.

The charities of this town are numerous and valuable. In Salisbury street are some remarkably handsome almshouses, of very ancient foundation, for men and women, intended to hold 10 men and 16 women; both men and women have an allowance of six shillings per week each; the men’s almshouses have been restored, and are a good specimen of Tudor architecture. The late Marquess of Westminster gave £5,000 in 1865 to these charities for the benefit of the women; and £1,000 was added in 1862 by George Wilkins esq. late of this town. There are a few other minor charities.

The population of the civil parishes in 1891 was:-Holy Trinity, 907; St. Peter’s, 801; St. James’s, 950, including 69 officers and inmates in the workhouse. The area of the parishes are, Holy Trinity 353 acres; rateable value, £2,795. St. James’s, 1,798 acres; rateable value, £4,361; and St. Peter’s, 72 acres; rateable value, £2,722.

The population of the municipal brough in 1891 was:-Holy Trinity (part of), 797; St. Peter (part of), 790; and St. James (part of), 535 ; these three are now combined in one parish named Shaftesbury. The area of the borough is 156 acres. A portion of the parish of St. James beyond the borough has been formed into a parish named Alcester, the remaining portion and the extra municipal parts of Holy Trinity and St. Peter have been added to and merged in the parish of Cann.

Petty Sessions are held at the Town hall as appointed, alternately with Gillingham, at 11 a.m. The following places are included in the petty sessional division:-Ashmore, Cann, Compton Abbas, Fantmell Magna, Bourton, Buckhorn Weston, Gillingham, Iwerne Minster, Kington Magna, Margaret Marsh, Melbury Abbas, Motcombe, Orchard East, Orchard West, Shaston Holy Trinity, Shaston St. Peter, Silton, Shaston St. James, Stower East, Stower West, Stower Provost, Sutton Waldron, Todber.

Shaftesbury Union

The union comprises the following parishes:-Alcester, Ashmore, Buckhorn Weston, Cann, Compton Abbas, East Orchard, East Stower, Fontmell Magna, Gillingham, Iwerne Minster, Kington Magna, Margaret Marsh, Melbury Abbas, Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Stower Provost, Sutton Waldron, Todber, West Orchard, West Stower. The population of the union in 1891 was 11,840; area, 37,247 acres; rateable value at Lady day, 1895, £81,168.

Places of Worship, with times of Services

Holy Trinity Church, Bimport-street (consolidated with St. Peter’s, High street), Rev. Frederick Ehlvers, rector; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; children’s service at 3 p.m. 3rd Sun. in the month. St. James’ Church, Rev. Richard Thurlow M.A. rector & surrogate; John Hayter, clerk; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; 18th Sunday in the month at 3 p.m.; 7.30 p.m. on Wednesday during Advent & Lent. Friends’ Meeting House, St. James’ street, 10.30 a.m. Congregational, Muston’s lane, Rev. James William Pointer; 11 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

Wesleyan, Parson’s pool, Rev. William P. Ellis & Rev. Thomas Pinfield; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Thur. 7 p.m. Brethren’s Meeting House, Ebenezer hall, Salisbury st.; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; Mon & Thur. 7.30 p.m. Primitive Methodist, St. James’ st. 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.

Schools

The Endowed Grammar School stands on the eastern outskirts of the town, in the parish of St. Peter’s on an elevated & extremely healthy position: it was built in 1878, in the Queen Anne style of architecture: the school has been reorganized under a scheme sanctioned by the Charity Commissioners, & was opened January 1879: new buildings have been erected for 60 boys, including 15 boarders, with headmaster’s residence attached: there is an extensive cricket field of about four acres adjoining the building; two Foundation Scholarships, each of the annual value of £4, & two Exhibitions on the Bimport Foundation, each of the annual value of £3, tenable at the school for two years, are awarded every August. The Right Hon. Lord Stalbridge P.C. chairman of the governors; H. C. Forrester, clerk to the governors; Pryce Thomas Taylor M.A. classical honours Exeter College, Oxford, headmaster; Leonard R. Treasure, certificated second master; Christopher John Thurlow, student master.

National (mixed), St. James’, built in 1873, for 220 children; average attendance, 152.

National (boys & girls), Bimport street, built in 1871; 134 boys’ & 134 girls; (infants) built in 1847 for 122; average attendance, 100 boys, 91 girls & 90 infants.

Kelly's Directory of Dorset (1895)

Surnames Found in Shaftesbury

RankSurnameNo. of People% of Population
1Brickell1424.12
2Wright782.26
3Gray611.77
4Foot581.68
5White501.45
6Case481.39
7Mayo451.31
8Hellier421.22
9Short421.22
10Brockway421.22
11Stainer371.07
12Burden371.07
13Hunt351.02
14Miles351.02
15Hayter351.02
16Lodge330.96
17Gatehouse330.96
18Dennis300.87
19Weldon300.87
20Hopkins300.87
21Brown300.87
22Young290.84
23Imber280.81
24Belbin280.81
25Wilmott270.78
26Norton250.73
27Maidment250.73
28Sims250.73
29Highman250.73
30Maskell240.70
31Roberts240.70
32Andrews240.70
33Parsons230.67
34Scammell230.67
35Hardy210.61
36Read210.61
37Arnold210.61
38Smith210.61
39Davis210.61
40O'Borne210.61
41Morgan200.58
42Stacey200.58
43Hacker200.58
44Mansfield190.55
45Padfield190.55
46Russell180.52
47Wareham170.49
48Cross170.49
49Dean170.49
50Denbeigh170.49
51Baker160.46
52Strange160.46
53Gumbleton160.46
54Upjohn160.46
55Lane150.44
56Cox150.44
57Woodrow150.44
58Trim150.44
59Stevens150.44
60Munday150.44
61Tanswell140.41
62Peach140.41
63Moore140.41
64Trowbridge140.41
65Genge140.41
66Taylor140.41
67Pond140.41
68Jenkins140.41
69Rogers140.41
70Hatcher130.38
71Fricker130.38
72King130.38
73Barnes130.38
74Burridge130.38
75Woodcock130.38
76Hillier130.38
77Lush130.38
78Phillips120.35
79Thorne120.35
80Gulliford120.35
81Jolliffe120.35
82Perry120.35
83Hall110.32
84Allen110.32
85Dyer110.32
86Toogood110.32
87Freke110.32
88Harding110.32
89Hoskins110.32
90Pike110.32
91Spicer110.32
92Farris110.32
93Webber100.29
94Mead100.29
95Johnson100.29
96Francis100.29
97Coombs100.29
98Burbidge100.29
99Pickford100.29
100Bennett100.29

* Statistics based on the 1881 census