Channel Islands Family History Records

Channel Islands Genealogical Records

Channel Islands Birth & Baptism Records

British Army Birth Index (1761-2005)

An index to births registered to British Army personal at home and abroad.

Birth Notices from The Times (1983-2003)

An index to over 100,000 birth and christening notices from The London Times.

British National Born at Sea (1854-1887)

An index to children born to British parents at sea. The index contains the name of both parents, child's name, date of birth and other details. Provides a reference to order a birth certificate.

British Maritime Births (1854-1960)

An index to children born to British parents at sea. The index contains the name of both parents, child's name, date of birth and other details. Provides a reference to order a birth certificate.

Channel Islands Birth & Baptism Index (1820-1907)

An index to over 40,000 births and baptisms recorded in the Channel Islands.

Channel Islands Marriage & Divorce Records

British Army Marriage Index (1796-2005)

An index to marriages registered for British Army personal at home and abroad.

Marriage Notices from The Times (1982-2004)

An index to over 80,000 marriage and engagement notices from The London Times.

British Nationals Married Overseas (1818-2005)

An index to marriages of British citizens overseas that were registered with the British Consul or High Commissioner Provides a reference that can be used to order a marriage certificate.

Foreign and Overseas Registers of British Subjects (1627-1965)

Registers of births/baptisms, marriages and deaths/burials containing over 160,000 entries from over 30 countries. These largely relate to British subjects.

FreeREG Marriage Index (1538-2000)

A growing index of marriages, currently containing over 4 million entries from Anglican and Non-conformist records in Britain and Jersey.

Channel Islands Death & Burial Records

British Army Death Index (1796-2005)

An index to deaths of British Army personal at home and abroad.

Death Notices from The Times (1982-1988)

An index to over 54,000 death notices and obituaries from The London Times.

Maritime Deaths (1781-1968)

A name index linked to images of original documents detailing around 950,000 deaths of those who worked on the seas and related industries.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

Titanic Deaths at Sea (1912)

Details of crew and passengers who died aboard RMS Titanic. Information given includes date, place & cause of death; gender; age; nationality; profession; and residence.

Channel Islands Church Records

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

Methodist Church Institutions & Boundaries (2012-Present)

An interactive map plotting the location of church institutions and delineating the church's boundaries.

The Baptist Handbook (1896)

An overview of Baptist institutions in the British Isles and abroad, with details of chapels and their particulars.

Church Plans Online (1800-1970)

Architectural plans, with some details of their construction. The database covers England, Wales, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands & Fife.

Congregationalist Ministers Index (1650-1972)

Biographical details of around 32,000 Congregationalist ministers in the British Isles and further afield.

Channel Islands Census & Population Lists

England, Wales, IoM & Channel Islands 1911 Census (1911)

The 1911 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1901 British Census (1901)

The 1901 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1891 British Census (1891)

The 1891 census provides details on an individual's age, residence, place of birth, relations and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows searches on for multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

1881 British Census (1881)

The 1881 census provides details on an individual's age, residence and occupation. FindMyPast's index allows for searches on multiple metrics including occupation and residence.

British Phone Books (1880-1984)

Directories containing over 275,000,000 entries. As well as name, address and phone number, occupations are often recorded. A useful census substitute.

Channel Islands Wills & Probate Records

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (PPV) (1384-1858)

A index to testators whose will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. They principally cover those who lived in the lower two thirds of Britain, but contain wills for residents of Scotland, Ireland, British India and other countries. A copy of each will may be purchased for digital download.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills (Subscription) (1384-1858)

An index and digital images of PCC wills, available on a subscription basis.

Index to Death Duty Registers (1796-1903)

An index to wills and administrations that incurred a death duty tax. The index can be used to order documents that give a brief abstract of the will and details on the duty. It can be used as a make-shift probate index.

Bank of England Wills Extracts Index (1717-1845)

An index to over 60,000 wills of people who died with money in public funds. Useful when researching counties where wills have been destroyed. Also contains wills for citizens of British colonies.

Dougal's Unclaimed Money Register (1650-1910)

A register of over 70,000 unclaimed estates.

Newspapers Covering Channel Islands

Channel Islands Monthly Review (1941-1945)

A newspaper published for those who escaped from the German occupied Channel Islands during WWII. It contains reports on the military front on the islands, with details on persons deported to Germany; obituaries; birth, marriage & death notices and general news of interest to former islanders. The newspaper is fully text searchable.

The Daily Herald (1926)

A London newspaper that later became The Sun.

Reynolds's Newspaper (1850-1900)

Originally founded as a chartist organ, the newspaper became a liberal platform.

London Daily News (1846-1900)

A 'radical' newspaper founded and initially edited by Charles Dickens. Regularly published birth, marriage and death announcements.

Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (1842-1900)

A popular illustrated, liberal newspaper; one of the most popular in Britain.

Channel Islands Obituaries

United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection (1882-Present)

A growing collection currently containing over 425,000 abstracts of obituaries with reference to the location of the full obituary.

Quakers Annual Monitor (1847-1848)

A collection of 364 obituaries of Quakers from the British Isles. The volume was published in 1849 and includes obituaries of those who died in late 1847 through 1848.

Musgrave's Obituaries (1421-1800)

This transcribed and searchable work by Sir William Musgrave contains 10,000s of brief obituaries. The work is a reference point for other works containing information on an individual.

Channel Islands Cemeteries

Billion Graves (1200-Present)

Photographs and transcriptions of millions of gravestones from cemeteries around the world.

Channel Islands Directories & Gazetteers

Kelly's Directory of the Channel Islands (1927)

A comprehensive place-by-place gazetteer, listing key contemporary and historical facts. Each place has a list of residents and businesses. Contains details on local schools, churches, government and other institutions.

Kelly's Channel Islands Directory (1911)

A directory of settlements on the Channel Islands detailing their history, agriculture, topography, economy and leading commercial, professional and private residents.

Kelly's Directory of the Channel Islands (1903)

A directory of residents and businesses; with a description of each settlement, containing details on its history, public institutions, churches, postal services, governance and more.

Kelly's Channel Islands Directory (1899)

A directory to the settlements of the Channel Islands detailing their history, agriculture, topography, economy and leading commercial, professional and private residents.

British Phone Books (1880-1984)

Directories containing over 275,000,000 entries. As well as name, address and phone number, occupations are often recorded. A useful census substitute.

Prison Hulk Registers (1802-1849)

From the late 18th century many prisoners in Britain were kept on decommissioned ships known as hulks. This collection contains nearly 50 years of registers for various ships. Details given include: prisoner's name, date received, age, year of birth and conviction details.

Perry's Bankrupt Gazette (1828-1867)

A publication giving brief details of bankruptcies, including the names of parties and companies involed.

Chancery Proceedings, Bridges Division (1613-1714)

Abstracts of 17th and 18th century chancery bills and answers. Details listed are: plaintiffs, defendants, details on the dispute and where the proceedings were held.

Chancery Proceedings (1558-1660)

Abstracts of late Tudor & early Stuart legal proceedings, listing plaintiffs, defendants, details on the dispute and where the proceedings were held.

Early Chancery Proceedings (1377-1558)

Abstracts of early legal records listing parties involved, details of the dispute and where the proceedings were held.

Channel Islands Taxation Records

Index to Death Duty Registers (1796-1903)

An index to wills and administrations that incurred a death duty tax. The index can be used to order documents that give a brief abstract of the will and details on the duty. It can be used as a make-shift probate index.

Channel Islands Land & Property Records

UK Poll Books and Electoral Rolls (1538-1893)

Poll books record the names of voters and the direction of their vote. Until 1872 only landholders could vote, so not everyone will be listed. Useful for discerning an ancestor's political leanings and landholdings. The collection is supplemented with other records relating to the vote.

Letters and Papers of Henry VIII (1509-1547)

A calendar of papers relating to Henry VIII's rule at home and abroad. Contains records relating to people from all walks of life.

Channel Islands Occupation & Business Records

UK Medical Registers (1859-1959)

Books listing doctors who were licensed to operate in Britain and abroad. Contains doctor's residencies, qualification and date of registration.

Railway Employment Records (1833-1963)

A rich collection of records documenting those who worked for railway companies that were later absorbed by the government. Records include: staff registers, station transfers, pensions, accident records, apprentice records, caution books, and memos. Records may include date of birth, date of death and name of father.

Royal Navy Medical Journals (1817-1857)

Indexed medical journals from British ships containing personal and medical details of patients. The journals list names, ages, rank/status, diseases, illness duration and notes on symptoms and treatment. Contains details on military men as well as people immigrating or being deported to colonies.

British Postal Service Appointment Books (1737-1969)

This collection gives brief details on the appointment of over 1.4 million people who worked for the Post Office. Includes references to corresponding data in the Postmaster General’s minute books and is a starting point for research in the rich archive of the British Postal Museum.

Royal Aero Club Aviators’ Certificates (1910-1950)

An index linked to original index cards and photographs of over 28,000 aviators who were issued their flying licences by the Royal Aero Club. These included the first military and naval personnel to become pilots. Contains over 13,000 photographs of pilots.

Channel Islands School & Education Records

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge Alumni Database (1198-1910)

A searchable database containing over 90,000 note-form biographies for students of Cambridge University.

Official List of Registered Teachers (1917)

A directory of registered teachers – their current school and date of registration. Also contains details on officers and operations of the Teachers Registration Council.

Pedigrees & Family Trees Covering Channel Islands

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Ancestry Member Family Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A compilation of lineage-linked family trees submitted by Ancestry users. The database contains over 2 billion individuals and is searchable by numerous metrics.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Burke's Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (1883)

Lineages and biographies for extinct peerage titles in England, Scotland & Ireland.

Burke's Landed Gentry of Britain & Ireland (1855)

Lineages of Britain and Ireland's untitled landed families; supplemented with biographical sketches.

Channel Islands Royalty, Nobility & Heraldry Records

FamilySearch Community Trees (6000 BC-Present)

A searchable database of linked genealogies compiled from thousands of reputable and not-so-reputable sources. Contains many details on European gentry & nobility, but covers many countries outside Europe and people from all walks of life.

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (1921)

A dictionary of families elevated to the peerage of Great Britain & Ireland. It includes genealogies and biographical details.

Burke's Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (1883)

Lineages and biographies for extinct peerage titles in England, Scotland & Ireland.

Burke's Landed Gentry of Britain & Ireland (1855)

Lineages of Britain and Ireland's untitled landed families; supplemented with biographical sketches.

Burke's Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies (1841)

Lineages and biographies for extinct baronetcies in England, Scotland & Ireland.

Channel Islands Military Records

Channel Islands Monthly Review (1941-1945)

A newspaper published for those who escaped from the German occupied Channel Islands during WWII. It contains reports on the military front on the islands, with details on persons deported to Germany; obituaries; birth, marriage & death notices and general news of interest to former islanders. The newspaper is fully text searchable.

Prisoners of War of British Army (1939-1945)

A searchable list of over 100,000 British Army POWs. Records contains details on the captured, their military career and where they were held prisoner.

British Prisoners of World War II (1939-1945)

Details on around 165,000 men serving in the British Army, Navy and Air Force who were held as prisoners during WWII.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls (1914-1920)

Index and original images of over 5 million medal index cards for British soldiers It can be searched by individual's name, Coprs, Unit and Regiment. Due to the loss of many WWI service records, this is the most complete source for British WWI soldiers

British Army WWI Service Records (1914-1920)

This rich collection contains contains records for 1.9 million non-commissioned officers and other ranks who fought in WWI. Due to bomb damage in WWI, around 60% of service records were lost. Documents cover: enlistment, medical status, injuries, conduct, awards and discharge. A great deal of genealogical and biographical documentation can be found in these documents, including details on entire families, physical descriptions and place of birth.

Channel Islands Immigration & Travel Records

Passenger Lists Leaving UK (1890-1960)

A name index connected to original images of passenger lists recording people travelling from Britain to destinations outside Europe. Records may detail a passenger's age or date of birth, residence, occupation, destination and more.

UK Incoming Passenger Lists (1878-1960)

A full index of passenger lists for vessels arriving in the UK linked to original images. Does not include lists from vessels sailing from European ports. Early entries can be brief, but later entries may include dates of births, occupations, home addresses and more. Useful for documenting immigration.

17th Century British Emigrants to the U.S. (1600-1700)

Details on thousands of 17th century British immigrants to the U.S., detailing their origins and nature of their immigration.

Migration from North America to Britain & Ireland (1858-1870)

A list of over 40,000 passengers traveling from North America to the British Isles. Details of passengers may include: occupation, nationality, gender, age, martial status, class, destination, and details of the vessel they sailed on.

Aliens Entry Books (1794-1921)

An un-indexed collection of over 100,000 documents of correspondence and other documents of the Home Office and the Aliens Office. Contains a great deal of information on aliens and those who applied for naturalisation.

Channel Islands Histories & Books

UK & Ireland Historical Postcards (1885-1950)

Over 19,000 postcards depicting places in the UK & Ireland.

Mary Evans Picture Library (2000 BC-Present)

A database of over 300,000 photos, etchings, engravings and other mediums depicting places and events in the British Isles and the rest of the world.

Ancestry Member Photos & Documents (6000 BC-Present)

Over 60 million historic photographs and documents submitted to Ancestry. This rich collection contains many rare sources of interest to local historians and will be relevant to most genealogical research.

Ancestry Member Stories (6000 BC-Present)

Over 7 million remembrances and historic details submitted by Ancestry members. Useful for local historians.

The Book of Household Management (1869)

A detailed look at the management of 19th century farm houses.

Biographical Directories Covering Channel Islands

Oxford University Alumni (1500-1886)

A name index linked to original images of short biographies for over 120,000 Oxford University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Cambridge University Alumni (1261-1900)

A transcript of a vast scholarly work briefly chronicling the heritage, education and careers of over 150,000 Cambridge University students. This is a particularly useful source for tracing the ancestry of the landed gentry.

Crockford's Clerical Directories (1868-1914)

Brief biographies of Anglican clergy in the UK.

The Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1654-1930)

A directory containing lengthy biographies of noted British figures. The work took over two decades to compile. Biographies can be searched by name and are linked to images of the original publication.

Chalmers' General Biographical Dictionary (1013-1812)

Detailed biographies of thousands of notable Europeans with details on ancestry.

Channel Islands Maps

Speed's Maps of Britain (1612)

County and national maps covering the British Isles, extracted from John Speed's landmark work, Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain.

Maps of The Channel Islands (1584-1897)

Digital images of maps covering the islands.

Old Maps Online (1497-2010)

An interactive index to thousands of maps covering the world, continents, countries and regions. The majority of maps cover Britain and Ireland.

Methodist Church Institutions & Boundaries (2012-Present)

An interactive map plotting the location of church institutions and delineating the church's boundaries.

Channel Islands Reference Works

Channel Islands Research Guide (1538-Present)

A beginner’s guide to researching ancestry in the Channel Islands.

Measuring Worth - GBP (1245-Present)

A calculator measuring the changing value of the British Pound using two price indices.

Dictionary of Traded Goods and Commodities (1550-1820)

A dictionary of nearly 4,000 terms found used in documents relating to trade and retail in early modern Britain.

Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry (1200-1700)

A dictionary of words used in heraldry, supplemented with over 1,000 illustrations.

Old Law Hands (1066-1733)

A chart showing numerous renderings of Latin letters in court hand, a script common in the medieval and early-modern periods.

Channel Islands Information

Historical Description

The Channel Islands have been possessed at different periods by different powers, so the whole of them have always been included in the same conquest These islands are all situated near to each other, in a bay, called St. Michael, between Cape la Hogue in Normandy, and Frebelle on the coast of Bretagne. They have been subject to the crown of England ever since the Norman conquest, and are at present the only remains of our Norman dominions.

It is not certainly known at what period they were annexed to the Roman empire; but in the reign of Marcus Antoninus they were not only totally subdued, but also mentioned by the Roman writers as places with which they were familiarly acquainted.

After the foundation of the French monarchy, they became a part of that kingdom, and remained subject to it till the 10th century, when the Danes and Normans having made settlements on the southern coast of Europe, they became an easy prey to those adventurers.

The inhabitants of these islands appear to have been converted to the Romish religion at the same time with the French, when they were made subject to the province of Neustria, now called Normandy; but in the year 912, Rollo the Norman, having conquered that part of France, annexed them to the bishopric of Constance, from which they were dismembered in the year 1449, and made part of the bishopric of Winchester.

After the Norman conquest they remained subject to that dutchy under its respective dukes, kings of England, till the reign of King John, when that weak prince, in order to gratify one of his favourites, gave them to the bishop of Exeter; but the king having lost all his continental dominions, the inhabitants regained their liberty, which they might have continued to enjoy, had it not been for intestine divisions among themselves. But being no way settled under one chief, and scarce knowing to whom they ought to be obedient, they tamely submitted to the arbitrary dictates of a tyrant, and once more threw themselves into the hands of the English.

In the reign of Henry III. when the French had recovered Normandy, these islands were, by solemn treaty, annexed to the crown of England, and the same treaty was renewed in the reign of Edward I. when the laws of Normandy were established in them, and all the people obliged to be obedient thereto.— These laws have been since published in the French language; but they are subject to the legislative authority of Great Britain, and all appeals are referred to and determined by the king and privy council.

Some writers have supposed that these laws of Normandy were taken from the code of Edward the Confessor, who, during his exile, spent some years in Jersey, but that opinion is certainly ill grounded. The original copy of King Edward’s laws is now lost, but from what transcripts yet remain in other authors, compared with the records in the British Museum, there appears a striking similarity between the laws of all the northern nations, so that there is no wonder that a person should mistake the one for the other.— The seeds of liberty were sown in all the Gothic constitutions; but before the people had time to enjoy the blessings of peace, civil dissentions arose among the princes, conquest took place, and those who were once free, found themselves under the necessity of being slaves to one tyrant, rather than to many.

These islands were governed by the Norman laws, many years, and to this day they are still, in a manner, under the same regulations, only that by virtue of several acts of parliament, they have undergone some material alterations.

During the wars between the French and English, in the reign of Edward III. these islands were taken from the latter, by means of the people having shaken off their allegiance; but they were again recovered; for the French could never retain them for any length of time.

In the course of the wars between the houses of York and Lancaster, great abuses seem to have been committed in them by means of the governors having the disposal of all places, which privilege they appear to have exercised without any attention to the interest of these islands.

These abuses seem to have been in part rectified in the reign of Edward IV. but not totally removed till many years after; for we often meet with heavy complaints against the government by the people, even so late as the reign of Queen Elizabeth, at which time the government appears to have been settled nearly on the same plan as it remains at present.

During the reign of Queen Mary, many of the inhabitants of these islands suffered death for their religion, and some of them endured the most excruciating torments, with a fortitude resembling the constancy and faith of the primitive martyrs. But on the accession of Queen Elizabeth, when the protestant religion was established in England, the inhabitants of these islands embraced it with the greatest cheerfulness; but petitioned the queen that they might be allowed to follow the same mode of worship as was practised by the protestants in France. Their request was in part complied with, but the smaller churches were still ordered to use the liturgy of the church of England, although they were much averse from its rites and ceremonies, as appears from their meeting together in a body, and choosing a synod of their own ministers, by whom the religion of the French protestants, or Presbyterians, was established, without any authority from the government of England.

When James I. ascended the throne, the same privileges were confirmed by letters-patent, but when Laud came into office, he used his utmost exertions to make the people embrace the rites and ceremonies of the church of England; to accomplish which, he ordered some of the young gentlemen to be educated at Oxford, but as soon as they had taken orders they chose rather to look for preferment in England than return to their native islands, so that the young ministers were still such as received their education at Sedan, Samure, and other protestant universities in Normandy.

In the year 1662, when the act of uniformity took place, the governors of these islands had strict orders to put it in execution, so that the rites and ceremonies of the church of England were again established.— By the same statute the canon law was restored, and many people who had received grants of lands were dispossessed of them, which obliged some ruined families to seek refuge and subsistence in other parts of the world.

As there is no assembly of the states, or deputies of the people in these islands, to act in a legislative capacity, the king’s order is a law binding on all ranks of people, and of the same force as an act of parliament.

Topography of Great Britain, written: 1802-29 by George Alexander Cooke

THESE islands consist of the large island of Jersey and the smaller one of Guernsey, with its dependencies, the islands of Alderney, Sark, Herm and Jethou, the whole forming a group in the Gulf of Avranches, off the coast of Brittany, France, and about 80 miles due south from the Bill of Portland, Dorset, on the south coast of England. The islands lie in the form of a crescent, the south horn of which (Jersey) being 20 miles west of St. Germain and the northern horn (Alderney) 12 miles west of Cape la Hague, Guernsey, with Sark, Herm and Jethou on its eastern side, being in the centre of the arc, the distance from the eastern side of Jersey to the longitude of Guernsey being about 30 miles, and the distance from Alderney to Jersey about the same; the dimensions of the three principal islands are Jersey 12 miles by 6, Guernsey 8 by 6, and Alderney 3 ¼ by 1, the total area of the islands being 48,322 acres. The population in 1901 was 95,618, via.:-males, 45,080 and females, 50,538.

The number of houses in 1901 was, inhabited, 17,024; uninhabited, 1,535 and building, 68.

There are traces of Druidical remains in the islands and also of Roman occupation, but they appear to have been a refuge for various sections of the inhabitants of both Gaul and Britain, and were subject to invasions from the Saxons and Danes in the reign of Charles the Simple: they were attached to the Dukedom of Normandy and bestowed upon a viking of the name of Rollo. This connection with Normandy is borne out by the legal customs still existing on the islands, and the seigneurs retain some part of their old French feudal rights. Being an appanage of the Dukedom of Normandy they passed to the English Crown, under William I., and though re-transferred on his death they finally became an English possession under Henry II. and have remained a loyal portion of the kingdom ever since. King John granted them a charter bestowing the right of self-government, Jersey and Guernsey (with its dependencies) each have a separate government under a bailiff, and a lieutenant-governor, both appointed by the Crown, the legislative functions being in the hands of an assembly called “The States,” which is presided over by the bailiff, and includes the jurats or magistrates, who, under the bailiff, form the Royal Court and try all cases.

The French have at various times attempted the conquest of the islands, but without success. Their last effort, in 1781, was repulsed by the island troops, under Major Pierson, whose death is represented in a well-known picture by Copley, now in the National Gallery.

The administrative division is, in the case of the two larger islands, the parish, which also becomes the parliamentary division, the States being composed of the official representatives of the parishes-viz., the jurats and constables elected by the parishioners, and the rectors nominated by the Crown, and in Jersey there are 14 additional elective representatives.

Military service is compulsory, and the militia is under the command of the respective lieutenant-governors, who are always military men.

The ecclesiastical jurisdiction is that of the Bishop of Winchester, administered by the Deans of Jersey and Guernsey.

The islands, being under the influence of the sea, enjoy a milder climate than either the south of England or northern France, and are well suited for agriculture, potatoes and early vegetables, tomatoes and fruit being the staple products, half the area of Jersey being devoted to the former, and the small cattle of these islands have a fine reputation for the quality of their milk: the Jersey cows are smaller than those of Guernsey or Alderney, but all have similar characteristics. The geological formation is mainly granite, and approach to the coasts in rendered difficult by the frequency of rocks as well as by the strong currents incident to the position of the islands. These currents are very diverse and continue to set in one direction two or three hours after high or low water.

The slope of the land is from north to south in Jersey and from south to north in Guernsey: both of these are fairly wooded and are well supplied with water by streams running down the different valleys to the sea, none of which, however, are of any size.

The coast lines of Guernsey and Jersey are very irregular and broken by numerous bays, except on the western side of Jersey, which forms one very flat bay: the harbours are St. Helier in Jersey, and St. Peter Port in Guernsey, both on the sheltered sides of the islands.

Steam communication is regular between the islands and Weymouth and Southampton: the only railways are those in Jersey from St. Helier along the Bay shore to St. Aubin, and thence by Don Bridge to Corbiere, and another along the south and eastern shores from St. Helier to Gorey.

The Islands militia comprises the Royal Jersey Artillery, the Guernsey Royal Artillery and Engineers, the Royal Alderney Artillery, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Royal Jersey Light Infantry, and the 1st and 2nd Guernsey Light Infantry.

The number of fishing boats registered in Jersey and Guernsey in 1902 was 220, with an aggregate tonnage of 722 tons and employing 215 hands.

The total number of vessels, sail and steam, registered in the islands in 1902 was 125; tonnage, 9,580.

The following table shows the acreage under each kind of crop, and the number of horses, cattle, sheep and pigs in the Channel Islands, as taken from the Agricultural Returns, 1902: —

CropsAcres
Corn and cereal s3,603
Roots, artificial grasses, cabbage and rape11,727
Clover and grasses9,642
Permanent pasture6,444
Bare fallow53
Orchards1,356
Small fruit542
Woods and plantations43
Live StockNumber
Horses for agriculture and brood mares3,441
Horses unbroken152
Cows in milk10,568
Other cattle:-— Two years and above1,623
Other cattle:-— One year and two3,063
Other cattle:-— under one year3,164
Ewes for breeding177
Other sheep296
Sows for breeding1,506
Other pigs8,171
StatisticNumber
Parishes Jersey 12, Guernsey 10, adjacent Islands 729
Mountain and heath land for grazing, acres1,769
Total area of the islands, 120,805 vergees, or acres48,083
Kelly's Directory of The Channel Islands (1899)